‘Zoom classes invade our privacy’: The astonishing claim of some teachers


State school heads are blocking teachers from hosting live online lessons, claiming that streaming classes from their homes is an invasion of privacy.

As schools closed under new coronavirus restrictions, some teachers took to social media to complain it was ‘off-putting’ having parents observe them at work.

Last night, anxious parents demanded state schools ramp up live online classes as experts warned that a lack of real-time lessons threatened to widen the gulf in equality between state and private pupils.

A mother from Buckinghamshire told The Mail on Sunday: ‘They need live lessons otherwise they are going to fall behind and may never be able to catch up.’

Most independent schools and top-performing state schools have rolled out full days of live lessons via Zoom and other video platforms since the new national lockdown came into force

While state school headteachers voiced their concerns about staff ‘burnout’ under the new lockdown, the contrast with the private sector could not be more stark.

Most independent schools and top-performing state schools have rolled out full days of live lessons via Zoom and other video platforms since the new national lockdown came into force. But large numbers of secondaries and primaries, particularly in poorer areas, are relying on pre-recorded lessons, YouTube videos and online worksheets for their pupils.

In a poll of 800 parents last week, almost a third said their children were not receiving any live lessons, suggesting that as many as three million pupils may not be having interactive video contact with their teachers during the lockdown.

Leading educationalist Professor Alan Smithers warned that some children were missing out on their education completely and their life chances could suffer.

The National Education Union appeared to suggest that only pushy parents want live lessons, adding that the call for live teaching is ¿often related to minority, but insistent, parental pressure¿. Pictured: Isla Stanton, 14, learning from home in Ashford, Kent

The National Education Union appeared to suggest that only pushy parents want live lessons, adding that the call for live teaching is ‘often related to minority, but insistent, parental pressure’. Pictured: Isla Stanton, 14, learning from home in Ashford, Kent

He said: ‘Children want to learn in real-time and thrive by interacting and learning with their friends. Pre-recorded lessons are no way near to being in school.

‘Not having children together in the classroom is increasing the unevenness of the educational experience and exacerbating inequality, and so is having this divide between schools that are offering live-streamed lessons and those that are not.’

Chris McGovern, chairman of The Campaign for Real Education, said it was ‘outrageous’ that disadvantaged children risked being ‘thrown on the scrap heap’.

He added: ‘It shows the price we are paying for closing schools. The gap between the better off and worse off is getting wider.’

Tory MP Robert Halfon, chairman of the Commons Education Select Committee, called for Education Secretary Gavin Williamson and regulators Ofsted to establish more detailed national guidelines for online teaching.

He said: ‘Some state schools are doing fantastic work rolling out live-streamed lessons and I can’t see why this cannot be replicated across the board. We cannot leave children behind. Children who are struggling and suffering at home need interaction with teachers, and live lessons make a world of difference.’

But militant teaching unions – which strongly urged teachers not to live-stream lessons last summer – said teachers must be able to choose whether to live-stream lessons or not and that it should only be used ‘when essential’.

The National Education Union appeared to suggest that only pushy parents want live lessons, adding that the call for live teaching is ‘often related to minority, but insistent, parental pressure’.

Guidance from the NASUWT teaching union even raises privacy concerns about pupils recording teachers’ live lessons on their phones and uploading them to pornography websites. The union ‘strongly advises members to not participate in live video lessons to pupils’ homes unless they are sure that measures are in place to prevent such inappropriate practices’.

After schools were closed on Tuesday, teachers flooded social media with complaints that they did not want to deliver lessons via video platforms.

Cassie Young, head of Brenzett CofE Primary School in Romney Marsh, Kent, said: ‘I can’t and won’t agree to my staff doing live lessons. The pressure, safeguarding and workload would result in burnout.

‘Pre-recorded works just as well, keeps people safe and allows pupils to work at a pace that suits them, freeing up staff to support.’

She claimed ‘professional distance’ was needed, adding: ‘Working at home and seeing inside people’s homes feels like a huge invasion of privacy.’

One primary teacher in Manchester said that she ‘felt sick’ with nerves over leading live lessons, adding: ‘The fact it’s my home does feel invasive.’

Jo Campbell, headteacher at Ore Village Primary Academy in Hastings, added: ‘I won’t put that pressure on my staff and I have too many safeguarding concerns. Pre-recorded sessions are enough.’

In a poll of 800 subscribers to the Parent Ping education app last week, only eight per cent of parents said their child had received more than five hours of live lessons that day. Some 13 per cent said their children were in live lessons for three to four hours and 11 per cent reported one to two hours. Nearly a third (31 per cent) said their children had no live lessons and 11 per cent had less than one hour.

Government guidance says primary school pupils should have an average of three hours work a day, and secondary school pupils should have at least four, with lessons delivered by teachers through ‘curriculum resources or video’

Parents told The Mail on Sunday that their children were not being set enough work. One mother from Kent said: ‘My 17-year-old daughter goes to a grammar school and has live lessons on Microsoft Teams all day. My 14-year-old son goes to a comprehensive and has no live lessons. He finishes his work in half an hour and would be on the PlayStation if I wasn’t telling him to read back through previous work.’

Another mother from Buckinghamshire said: ‘My children’s school is doing one live lesson a day private schools locally are doing a full diet of live lessons and after-school clubs with their boys.’

Paul Woods, principal of Westminster Academy in Central London, said his school was continuing with the full timetable, with all lessons live-streamed to all 1,100 pupils.

He said: ‘Every child has been given a Google Chromebook and we are sticking to our normal timetable. We like having the real-time interaction, not just for education reasons but we can monitor our students’ emotions at a time when things may be difficult for them.

‘Teachers are able to see in real time how a child is coping and whether they are adapting well in these challenging times.

‘It’s certainly not a substitute for being in the classroom but it’s the next best thing.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk