Zoe Ball reveals medical diagnosis which caused her to have a ‘meltdown’ while filming episode of TV show

Zoe Ball has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

The BBC Radio 2 presenter, 53, has spoken out about the condition which leaves her finding it difficult to complete some tasks other people might see as routine.

ADHD can cause people to struggle with their concentration while it can also cause restlessness, among other things. 

Broadcaster Zoe, whose son Woody also has the condition, said her ADHD caused her to have a ‘meltdown’ while filming an upcoming episode of Taskmaster as she struggled to deal with the mental arithmetic involved in one of the tasks.

She told the Daily Mirror: ‘My brain is just all over the goddamn shop.

Zoe Ball has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, with the condition leaving her finding it difficult to complete some tasks other people might see as routine (pictured in September)

ADHD can cause people to struggle with their concentration while it can also cause restlessness, among other things

ADHD can cause people to struggle with their concentration while it can also cause restlessness, among other things

‘I am ADHD. My son [Woody] and I are both, we’re quite similar. I make myself laugh sometimes, because if I’m in a small space and I’ve got loads of tasks to do, I can cover so many miles. 

‘My family, they laugh because they’ll find things of mine in certain places and they’re like, “If you follow this, you’ll see what Mum was trying to achieve”.

‘I have 18 pairs of glasses and I will still lose all of them… my brain is just all over the goddamn shop.’

On her Taskmaster appearance, she added: ‘So a particular task involved a bit of timing, which is maths, which is, again, not a strength, I physically started to melt down. That did hurt my head.’

It comes after Katie Price revealed why she chooses not to follow doctors’ recommendations for taking ADHD medication after she was diagnosed back in July.

The TV personality, 45, previously explained she was learning to understand how the disorder has affected her past behaviour, yet the star has now admitted she is refusing medication.

Appearing on Jamie Laing’s podcast, Private Parts, Katie opened up about her health diagnosis.

As Jamie asked whether they put her on medication, Katie replied: ‘They have put me on something, but you can get Ritalin and all this stuff but I don’t want to rely on medication.’

Broadcaster Zoe, whose son Woody (pictured) also has the condition, said her ADHD caused her to have a 'meltdown' while filming an upcoming episode of Taskmaster

Broadcaster Zoe, whose son Woody (pictured) also has the condition, said her ADHD caused her to have a ‘meltdown’ while filming an upcoming episode of Taskmaster

She added: ‘They’ve put me on something mild and it makes me really sleepy so I haven’t taken it.’

The star explained how she plans to see her consultant because of the negative effects of the medication.

She added: ‘It makes me really sleepy and I don’t want that because I feel like it suppresses my personality.’

The symptoms of ADHD include restlessness and difficulty concentrating, as well as excessive physical moving, talking and acting without thinking.

Katie said she was in Thailand getting a tattoo when the doctor rang her to confirm the tests revealed she had ADHD.

He asked her: ‘Do you think you have ADHD?’ to which she replied: ‘Yeah, but how bad?’

Katie Price, 45, revealed during an appearance on Jamie Laing's podcast Private Parts why she is refusing ADHD medication after she was diagnosed earlier this year (pictured this month)

Katie Price, 45, revealed during an appearance on Jamie Laing’s podcast Private Parts why she is refusing ADHD medication after she was diagnosed earlier this year (pictured this month)

The doctor then confirmed: ‘No you’ve severely got it.’

Katie previously discussed the diagnosis with OK! magazine, saying: ‘I’ve tried to educate my mum, but my brain is wired differently to other people.

‘I hate labels, but now my mum and I have both spoken to doctors and she has realised why I’ve done things in the past, why I act the way I do, why I do things, why I am the way I am.

‘It’s not because I don’t listen and take it on board, there’s just something in me. I’ve got better now, I’ve learnt with therapy to hold back, to listen, and think of what other people are saying – maybe they’re right, maybe they’re wrong, but I think of the consequences.’

‘It didn’t exist in my head, a consequence, what could go wrong… So, I’ve learned. It’s taken me 45 years, but I’m still here.

Katie went on to say that her behaviour has put her in situations which caused ‘unnecessary drama and stress’.

ADHD symptoms typically appear at an early age and become more noticeable as a child grows.

The majority of cases are diagnosed in children under the age of 12 but some people are not diagnosed until adulthood.

According to the NHS, the causes of ADHD are not known but the condition has been shown to run in families.

WHAT IS ADHD?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a behavioural condition defined by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

It affects around five per cent of children in the US. Some 3.6 per cent of boys and 0.85 per cent of girls suffer in the UK. 

Symptoms typically appear at an early age and become more noticeable as a child grows. These can also include:

  • Constant fidgeting 
  • Poor concentration
  • Excessive movement or talking
  • Acting without thinking
  • Inability to deal with stress 
  • Little or no sense of danger 
  • Careless mistakes
  • Mood swings
  • Forgetfulness 
  • Difficulty organising tasks
  •  Continually starting new tasks before finishing old ones
  • Inability to listen or carry out instructions 

Most cases are diagnosed between six and 12 years old. Adults can also suffer, but there is less research into this.

ADHD’s exact cause is unclear but is thought to involve genetic mutations that affect a person’s brain function and structure.

Premature babies and those with epilepsy or brain damage are more at risk. 

ADHD is also linked to anxiety, depression, insomnia, Tourette’s and epilepsy.  

There is no cure. 

A combination of medication and therapy is usually recommended to relieve symptoms and make day-to-day life easier. 

Source: NHS Choices 

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