Workers lay Westminster Abbey’s field of remembrance crosses


Remembering the fallen: Workers begin to lay Westminster Abbey’s field of remembrance crosses ahead of ‘short, focused’ wreath-laying ceremonies during new Covid lockdown

  • Thousands of crosses being placed by volunteers at Westminster Abbey today
  • Remembrance services will go ahead over coming days amid second lockdown  
  • Remembrance events will be allowed as long as social distancing is maintained 

Thousands of crosses are being placed at Westminster Abbey today as the nation gets set to remember fallen servicemen and women. 

Volunteers are laying more than 12,000 crosses over 380 plots laid out in the names of military associations and other organisations. 

Remembrance services will go ahead over the coming days despite a second lockdown looming over the UK, with millions facing stringent new restrictions on Thursday. 

Work has begun on laying crosses in the Field of Remembrance at Westminster Abbey in Westminster, London

Volunteers are laying more than 12,000 crosses over 380 plots laid out in the names of military associations and other organisations

Volunteers are laying more than 12,000 crosses over 380 plots laid out in the names of military associations and other organisations

The Royal British Legion is readying the Field of Remembrance at Westminster Abbey which will be officially opened on November 5

The Royal British Legion is readying the Field of Remembrance at Westminster Abbey which will be officially opened on November 5

The event has been organised by The Poppy Factory since 1928 and in recent years has been opened by Prince Harry

The event has been organised by The Poppy Factory since 1928 and in recent years has been opened by Prince Harry

The Royal British Legion is readying the Field of Remembrance at Westminster Abbey which will be officially opened on November 5.

The event has been organised by The Poppy Factory since 1928 and in recent years has been opened by Prince Harry. 

Each year the Field is opened every Thursday before Remembrance Sunday and remains open for a further ten days. 

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman today said guidance would be given to councils but remembrance events would be allowed as long as social distancing was maintained.

There will still be a national service at the Cenotaph in London, which will be broadcast on TV.

‘We are certainly not cancelling Remembrance Sunday events but we must be mindful of the risks such events pose, especially to veterans who are often elderly,’ the spokesman said.

‘What we are saying to local authorities in England is that they may organise remembrance services but they should be outside and social distance should be maintained.

‘We will be updating the guidance shortly.’

The spokesman added: ‘It’s important that the country can continue to come together to remember the sacrifice of those who have died in the service of their country and we will ensure that Remembrance Sunday is appropriately commemorated while protecting public health.’

It had been reported that Health Secretary Matt Hancock had told Tory MPs that only ‘short, focused’ wreath-laying events will be allowed. 

The opening of The Royal British Legion's Field of Remembrance at the National Memorial Arboretum

The opening of The Royal British Legion’s Field of Remembrance at the National Memorial Arboretum

This morning, the Royal British Legion held its own ceremony at the National Memorial Arboretum

This morning, the Royal British Legion held its own ceremony at the National Memorial Arboretum

The Field of Remembrance pays tribute to all those who have lost their lives in conflict from the First World War to the present day, with each tribute carrying a personal message to someone who lost their life during Service. More than 26,000 Tributes and commemorative markers are being planted at the NMA in memory of Service men and women who have lost their lives

The Field of Remembrance pays tribute to all those who have lost their lives in conflict from the First World War to the present day, with each tribute carrying a personal message to someone who lost their life during Service. More than 26,000 Tributes and commemorative markers are being planted at the NMA in memory of Service men and women who have lost their lives

The Field of Remembrance pays tribute to all those who have lost their lives in conflict from the First World War to the present day, with each tribute carrying a personal message to someone who lost their life during Service. 

Today, the Royal British Legion held its own ceremony at the National Memorial Arboretum (NMA) in Staffordshire. 

More than 26,000 tributes and commemorative markers are being planted at the NMA in memory of service men and women who have lost their lives.

The official opening of the 2020 Field of Remembrance at the NMA is closed to the public, due to the current restrictions around Covid-19. 

The Field will open to the public after the ceremony today, though visitors must pre-book. 

Remembrance Day ceremonies were under threat last night from the second lockdown rules. The Cenotaph is pictured above on March 23rd

Remembrance Day ceremonies were under threat last night from the second lockdown rules. The Cenotaph is pictured above on March 23rd

Under the second lockdown restrictions, people are not allowed to leave their homes unless they have a good reason, such as for work or essential shopping, and they can meet only one person from another household outside for recreation or exercise.

Remembrance Day events that do take place will involve limited numbers and will be short. 

On Saturday, the Daily Mail revealed that singing has been banned at the Westminster Abbey Armistice Day service to stop the spread of Covid-19. 

Remembrance Day events that do take place will involve limited numbers and will be short. People are seen at the Cenotaph in November 2019

Remembrance Day events that do take place will involve limited numbers and will be short. People are seen at the Cenotaph in November 2019

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk