What you need to earn an hour to be considered above-average and the jobs paying six-figure salaries


Australians need to be earning more than $42.50 an hour or $77,350 a year to be considered above average and most likely need a degree to be on a six-figure salary.

New Australian Bureau of Statistics data released on Wednesday has revealed how much workers are typically making before tax.

Managers, professionals and men typically made more, by virtue of having higher hourly rates of pay and more rostered hours.

Australians need to be earning more than $42.50 an hour or $77,350 a year to be considered above average and most likely need a degree to be on a six-figure salary (pictured are shoppers at Melbourne’s Bourke Street Mall)

Australia’s pay scale

MANAGERS: $65.10 an hour or $118,482 a year

PROFESSIONALS: $57.90 an hour or $105,378 a year

LABOURERS: $31 an hour or $56,420 a year  

SALES: $30.50 an hour or $55,510 a year 

With the government classifying full-time work to be 35 hours or more a week, someone earning an average, hourly wage of $42.50 is typically earning $77,350 a year – or $1,487.50 a week.

Managers had the highest salaries, with their hourly wage of $65.10 translating into $2,278.50 a week or $118,482 a year. 

Professionals earned $57.90 an hour, working out at $2,026.50 a week or $105,378 annually.

At the bottom of the pay scale, sales representatives on average hourly wages of $30.50, or $1,067.50 a week, had the lowest salaries of $55,510.

Labourers on $31 an hour, or $1,085 a week, earned slightly more at $56,420.

Men, with typical hourly wages of $44.50, earned $80,990 a year on average if they worked full time. 

Women, on $40.20 an hour, earned $1,407 a week or $73,164 a year if they were on a full-time roster.  

Bjorn Jarvis, the ABS’s head of labour statistics, said working hours explained the actual bigger disparity in pay between the two genders in the data taken from May 2021.

‘Hourly earnings comparisons are useful in understanding gender pay differences, beyond weekly earnings measures, given men are more likely to work full-time than women,’ he said.

Women, by virtue of having fewer working hours as they cared for their children, typically earned $1,394 a week, or $72,488 a year compared with $1,625 a week for men or $84,500 a year.

Female-dominated occupations also had lower pay when compared with semi-skilled sectors where men were more numerous.

Clerical and administrative workers on average earned $36.90 an hour, working out at $1,291.50 a week or $67,158 a year if they worked the minimum number of shifts to be classified as full-time.

Community and personal care staff, another job mainly done by women, had average hourly pay of $35.40 working out at $1,239 a week and $64,428 on an annual basis. 

By comparison, workers in the male-dominated machinery operators and drivers category typically made $37.40 an hour, or $1,309 a week and $68,068 a year. 

Technician and trades workers on $39.50 an hour, or $1,382.50 a week, typically made $71,890. 

Professionals earned $57.90 an hour, working out at $2,026.50 a week or $105,378 annually (pictured are commuters at Martin Place in Sydney)

Professionals earned $57.90 an hour, working out at $2,026.50 a week or $105,378 annually (pictured are commuters at Martin Place in Sydney)

At the bottom of the pay scale, sales representatives on average hourly wages of $30.50, or $1,067.50 a week, had the lowest salaries of $5,510 (pictured is a waitress at Sydney's Opera Bar). Women, by virtue of having fewer working hours as they cared for their children, typically earning $1,394 a week, or $72,488 a year compared with $1,625 a week for men or $84,500 a year

At the bottom of the pay scale, sales representatives on average hourly wages of $30.50, or $1,067.50 a week, had the lowest salaries of $5,510 (pictured is a waitress at Sydney’s Opera Bar). Women, by virtue of having fewer working hours as they cared for their children, typically earning $1,394 a week, or $72,488 a year compared with $1,625 a week for men or $84,500 a year

New Australian Bureau of Statistics data has revealed how much workers are typically making before tax

New Australian Bureau of Statistics data has revealed how much workers are typically making before tax

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