Urgent warning for Kmart customers after a scam with Nintendo Switches appeared


Urgent warning for Kmart customers as scam advertising fools shoppers into losing as much as $700 – here’s how to spot it

  • A crafty scam has emerged fooling Kmart customers into handing over cash
  • The false ad claims that Nintendo Switch stock is now $2.95, down from $379.86
  • A handful of consumers have fallen prey to the scam and handed over details
  • One woman described how her friend lost $700 to the Facebook scam 

Kmart customers have been warned about a new scam circulating in bargain hunting Facebook groups in which advertisements offer Nintendo Switches for $2.95.

The fake Facebook post has been circulating in parents’ groups online and has already fooled a number of Aussies into handing their card details over.

The post includes a photograph showing a doctored Kmart price tag with a price tag showing that the gaming device has been reduced from $379.86 to $2.95.

It also claims that the lower price point is due to a contract dispute between Kmart and Nintendo.

The fake Facebook post has been circulating in parents’ groups online and has already fooled a number of Aussies into handing their card details over

This is factually incorrect and one of the first signs that something is amiss about the too-good-to-be-true advertisement. 

‘Kmart broke its contract with Nintendo and is giving away a Nintendo Switch game console to every Australian for $2.95,’ the caption on the scam post reads.

One shopper claimed her friend had lost $700 after falling for the scam, as the fraudsters took her bank details and extracted more money than they had promised. 

‘BEWARE. Another scam page going around, also there is a Dyson one,’ she said. 

‘Do not fall for it. Friend did and has lost around $700. They just keep taking from your bank. Can’t stop it unless you email them and threaten with lawyers.’

‘Unfortunately I was one of those people who thought it was real,’ another woman said.

One shopper claimed her friend had lost $700 after falling for the scam, as the fraudsters took her bank details and extracted more money than they had promised

One shopper claimed her friend had lost $700 after falling for the scam, as the fraudsters took her bank details and extracted more money than they had promised

‘I just wanted to buy my boys one. The problem I now have with people trying to get money from my account.’

Another wrote: ‘I almost did it until I got to the fine print. There it said about taking $54.00 monthly for… well, I don’t know what.

‘I stopped there and cancelled. Now they keep sending me emails asking me not to forget them. I’m doing all I can to do just that, forget them!’

While others believed the advertisement was so fake it’s the consumers fault that they fell for it in the first place. 

While others believed the advertisement was so fake it's the consumers fault that they fell for it in the first place

While others believed the advertisement was so fake it’s the consumers fault that they fell for it in the first place

‘Phishing messages are designed to look genuine, and often copy the format used by the organisation the scammer is pretending to represent, including their branding and logo,’ ACCC’s Scamwatch website said.

‘They will take you to a fake website that looks like the real deal, but has a slightly different address. For example, if the legitimate site is www.realbank.com.au, the scammer may use an address like ‘www.reallbank.com’.

‘If you provide the scammer with your details online or over the phone, they will use them to carry out fraudulent activities, such as using your credit cards and stealing your money.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk