Twitter users left ‘horrified’ after discovering clowns trademark make-up designs on eggs


‘It’s like a horror movie!’ Social media users are left ‘terrified’ after discovering clowns trademark their make-up designs by painting them on EGGS

  • Jo Hauge, from Scotland, took to Twitter after discovering clowns trademark their makeup designs by painting them on eggs 
  • Shared snap and revealed 200 hand-painted eggs are housed in London gallery 
  • Social media users were left divided, with some saying it was like a ‘horror film’ 

Twitter users have been left ‘terrified’ after finding out that clowns trademark their make-up designs by painting them on eggs. 

Jo Hauge, from Glasgow, Scotland, took to Twitter to share her bizarre discovery that there are more than 200 hand-painted eggs housed in a London gallery, which have been especially created as ‘a file of faces so that clowns can avoid copying one another’. 

Alongside a snapshot of the collection, she penned: ‘Sometimes I remember that if a clown wants to trademark their makeup they have to paint it on an egg that is stored in a special clown egg warehouse and then I have to go lie down.’ 

And the revelation has caused quite a stir online, with some branding it ‘terrifying,’ while others insisted it had ‘made my day’.

Jo Hauge, from Scotland, took to social media to share the bizarre discovery that there are more than 200 hand-painted eggs housed in a London gallery, which have been created as ‘a file of faces so that clowns can avoid copying one another’

In the snap shared by Jo, the shelves can be seen lined with dozens of intricately decorated eggs which are balanced on individual stands and labelled with their corresponding clown names. 

And social media users were quick to point out that the image was like something ‘from a horror movie,’  

‘EASILY the scariest place on earth,’ one wrote, while a second agreed: ‘WAIT THIS IS REAL? I thought it was just from the clown horror movie, holy sh**.’

A third who was equally unimpressed added: ‘I truly hate that I know this now.’ 

The shelves are lined with dozens of intricately decorated eggs which are balanced on individual stands and all labelled with their corresponding clown names (pictured)

The shelves are lined with dozens of intricately decorated eggs which are balanced on individual stands and all labelled with their corresponding clown names (pictured)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social media users were quick to point out that the creepy eggs looked like something from a horror film as one questioned 'is this real?' (pictured)

Social media users were quick to point out that the creepy eggs looked like something from a horror film as one questioned ‘is this real?’ (pictured) 

It is thought that one in 12 per cent of people in the UK suffer with coulrophobia – the fear of clowns. 

However, others were less quick to judge the seemingly creepy arrangement, with one social media user joking: ‘This made my day.’

Another complimentary review about the eerie collection read: ‘This is still one of my goals in life, though I’ve never desired to put in the work.’

A third added: ‘I think stores should sell eggs like this, I would buy more.’ 

It is thought that one in 12 per cent of people in the UK suffer with coulrophobia - the fear of clowns (collection pictured)

It is thought that one in 12 per cent of people in the UK suffer with coulrophobia – the fear of clowns (collection pictured)

 

 

Others were less quick to judge the seemingly creepy arrangement with one social media user stating: 'This made my day' (pictured)

Others were less quick to judge the seemingly creepy arrangement with one social media user stating: ‘This made my day’ (pictured)

The egg-based system of registry, which is currently stored at a church in Dalston, East London, is said to show the make-up copyright for members of Clowns International.

But the collection operates outside the copyright courts and cannot be enforced by lawyers.

The tradition of painting clown faces on chicken eggs dates back to 1946 when it was started by chemist Stan Bult as a hobby. 

The practice faded into obscurity before being resurrected in 1984 when professional artists were employed to paint the faces – this time on ceramic eggs.

The eggs are thought to take several days of painstaking work to complete, with painters only paid £15 for each completed.

The tradition of painting clown faces on chicken eggs dates back to 1946 when it was started by chemist Stan Bult as a hobby

The tradition of painting clown faces on chicken eggs dates back to 1946 when it was started by chemist Stan Bult as a hobby 

The collection of eggs operates outside the copyright courts and cannot be enforced by lawyers

The collection of eggs operates outside the copyright courts and cannot be enforced by lawyers



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