TikTok star bidding to attract investors to his latest get-rich-scheme after last failed attempt


An Instagram and TikTok influencer who was once alleged to have been part of a scam in which investors lost nearly £4 million has started a new get-rich-quick scheme.

Gurvin Dyal, 23, is once again trying to entice people to invest, this time in what he calls e-commerce courses, by posting pictures of himself with supercars and enjoying a jet-setting lifestyle, staying in luxury hotels and holiday lets.

Last weekend he filmed himself driving his rose gold covered supercar around London – and received almost 350,000 likes on TikTok.

Dyal boasts on his website that his success in business has enabled him to move up with his family from living in a two bedroom council flat in east London to a five bedroom detached house in an upmarket area of Essex.

His Instagram account called Mr.Gurvz has a million followers and has most recently posted pictures of him posing with his second-hand McLaren supercar after paying to have it given a rose gold coloured wrap.

Gurvin Dyal, 23, is once again trying to entice people to invest, this time in what he calls e-commerce courses, by posting pictures of himself with supercars and enjoying a jet-setting lifestyle, staying in luxury hotels and holiday lets

But MailOnline can reveal that he was living until recently with his mother and younger brother in a tatty rented three bed terraced house with peeling paintwork on a busy road in Ilford, Essex.

A near neighbour of the house who asked not to be named, joked: ‘Everyone around here knew that Gurvin had plenty of big ideas and loved to pose in his expensive cars and designer clothes.

‘It is hardly a millionaire’s playground in this corner of Ilford. We’ve got a McDonalds at the end of the road, and there’s not a lot else around here.’

Land Registry records reveal that the house is owned by a woman living in Woodford Green, Essex, who bought it for £275,000 in 2007.

Dyal contacted MailOnline this week to try and promote his latest TikTok video showing him slowly driving his 200mph McLaren through central London as crowds of people raised their mobile phones to film him.

MailOnline can reveal that he was living until recently with his mother and younger brother in a tatty rented three bed terraced house with peeling paintwork on a busy road in Ilford, Essex

MailOnline can reveal that he was living until recently with his mother and younger brother in a tatty rented three bed terraced house with peeling paintwork on a busy road in Ilford, Essex

His Instagram account called Mr.Gurvz has a million followers and he often shares his luxury adventures

His Instagram account called Mr.Gurvz has a million followers and he often shares his luxury adventures

He agreed to meet a reporter in the car park of a David Lloyd gym in Gidea Park, Essex, where he parked his six-year-old motor in a disabled bay, with his overweight Maltese and Poodle cross dog called Kayd sitting in the passenger seat beside him.

Dyal refused to disclose where he and his family were now living, but insisted that it was a five bedroom detached house. He also declined to reveal whether he was renting or had bought the property, saying: ‘I would rather not disclose that’.

He said: ‘The main reason I moved was that I was living on a main road and people could point out my house. I want to keep that side of my life as private now.’

Defending his decision to live at home with his mother, he added: ‘It makes senses for me to live with my family. I am not married. What am I going to do – live in an apartment and stare at the walls by myself? It doesn’t make sense.

‘People try to slate me over that, but they have a different mindset that if you make money, you should go and buy your own place.’

He insisted that he owned his £90,000 car outright including the customised number plate MR60 RVZ, as well as a black Maserati.

Dyal said: 'This was my dream car. I even posted a picture of a McLaren in 2018 with a caption, saying, ''One day''

Dyal said: ‘This was my dream car. I even posted a picture of a McLaren in 2018 with a caption, saying, ”One day”

Dyal admitted having a second set of number plates for use off road and in social media pictures showing a doctored version of his registration, making it read MR GURVZ

He brazenly boasted about his latest business venture, selling advice to people on how to make money from dropshipping – marketing and selling products which are held and shipped out by a third party supplier.

Dyal claimed that he was earning a ‘five figure’ sum every month from a string of online businesses, based on his dropshipping model and selling items ranging from candles and Christmas products to house decorations.

He told how he wanted to recruit people willing to pay him £997 each for his dropshipping course, or for an alternative course of tuition and ongoing support for £200 upfront fee with a total of £3,500 to pay once their profits went over £10,000.

Dyal also claimed that he had his own vaping products business, promoted by celebrities, influencers and rappers, which was being lined up to be sold for ‘a six figure sum’.

But it is less than two-years-ago that up to 1,250 investors who ploughed money into his foreign exchange trading scheme ended up losing nearly every penny.

Last weekend he filmed himself driving his rose gold covered supercar around London - and received almost 350,000 likes on TikTok

Last weekend he filmed himself driving his rose gold covered supercar around London – and received almost 350,000 likes on TikTok

Many of them were said to have been sucked in by wanting to emulate Dyal after seeing pictures of him flaunting his supercars and what appeared to be an enviable lifestyle.

But the scheme he promoted led to investors losing more than £3.5million when their trading accounts were largely emptied over Christmas, 2020.

A BBC Three documentary called Scam City: Money, Mayhem and Maseratis claimed Dyal assured investors that he was an authorised trader, promising guaranteed profits of up to £300 a day.

The documentary spoke to one victim called Jonathan, 24, who worked as a systems accountant and invested £17,000 he’d saved up to buy his first home, only to be left with just £48.

Dyal who claimed he turned £200 into £100,000 while at university, offered trading services via his company GS3 Trades which was not regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and did not even have a licence to trade.

It later transpired that investments were being looked after by another firm registered in The Bahamas and not subject to UK regulation.

Dyal insisted that he did not now have a flash lifestyle, apart from indulging his love of fast cars

Dyal insisted that he did not now have a flash lifestyle, apart from indulging his love of fast cars

Dyal insisted he had done nothing wrong with his earlier investment scheme, and had been investigated by police who had decided to take no action against him.

Speaking through a set of braces on his teeth, he said: ‘It is so bad that I was portrayed like this when I was not charged with anything or even arrested.’

He denied making money out of the collapse of his client investments, and insisted that the broking company he used was to blame.

Dyal said: ‘None of the money came to me. They received all the funds and ripped me off in the process. They ripped off family members of mine, close friends and teachers I was at school with.

‘If I thought it was so bad, why would I get people so close around me involved? I wasn’t the only social media influencer who did this, because they had a ton of other influencers. However, I was used as a scapegoat.

‘I only bought in about £200,000 worth of clients, while the total amount bought in by all influencers was about £2million. There was a profit of £2million which made £4million, and that was the money which was lost.’

Companies House records reveal that Dyal currently has control of three companies which had combined assets of less than £140,000 on March 31 last year, according to the most recent filed accounts.

A near neighbour of the house who asked not to be named, joked: 'Everyone around here knew that Gurvin had plenty of big ideas and loved to pose in his expensive cars and designer clothes'

A near neighbour of the house who asked not to be named, joked: ‘Everyone around here knew that Gurvin had plenty of big ideas and loved to pose in his expensive cars and designer clothes’

GS3 Holdings had assets of £40,756 while GS3 Teaches was worth £66,311 and GS3 Motors had assets of £31,493. A fourth company GS3 Marketing which was dissolved in October this year had assets of £32,448 in March last year.

Speaking of his new car, Dyal said: ‘I only just picked it up on Friday after getting it wrapped. Usually, a wrap like this would cost £10,000, but I got a promotional offer because of my social media.

‘I always get high discount, even when I am going to eat out. I am from a humble background so I appreciate that.

‘People say, ”You have got money, why would you do that?” But to me, every penny means something, so why not.’

‘This was my dream car. I even posted a picture of a McLaren in 2018 with a caption, saying, ”One day”.’

Dyal insisted that he did not now have a flash lifestyle, apart from indulging his love of fast cars.

He said: ‘When I was 19 or 20, I would spend thousands of pounds on a night out – but now I have matured. My life is now more family orientated rather than spending, spending, spending.

‘I am more interested in expanding my little empire and hoping to launch new products. I have my own vape brand, and I am looking into doing a vodka brand.’

Describing his current online business, he said: ‘I have a had a load of businesses in the last five years and some have lost me a great amount of money. There is stuff I would never step near investment-wise ever again.

‘I lost pretty much everything, and I started a new journey from scratch about two years ago, and got into e-commerce.

‘I built on-line stores through dropshipping which you don’t actually need money to start with which was ideal for me at that stage.

‘It works by building a website and using products with a supplier in China. Every time you get an order, the supplier in China ships directly to your customer.

‘You only pay the supplier after you have got the money form the customer.

‘I also set up my own Academy. I wanted to provide an alternative education root for people to start their own legitimate businesses.

‘I started selling courses at a much lower price, but as I started getting testimonials from people, the price has gone up.

‘Now I am selling courses for £3,500 with an admin fee of around £200, but people only pay £3,500 after they have made £10,000. Usually it would be within 60 or 70 days of starting.’

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