TikTok star and gymnast Olivia Dunne models leotard and a massive boot after injuring her foot


TikTok star and gymnast Olivia Dunne showed off her stunning figure – and an injured foot – in a sparkly leotard on Monday morning, just days after it was announced that LSU gymnastics had hired a bodyguard to protect her amid the ongoing frenzy surrounding her meets.

The stunning college athlete, 20, better known as Livvy, has been making waves on the internet and in the gymnastics world recently – so much so, that security had to be increased at her gymnastic events after hoards of fans, most of whom were teenage boys, started ‘swarming’ her and her teammates.

The star has become such a big sensation over the last few months that scores of excited young men have started to descend upon her meets – despite her not even being able to compete because of an injury.

Olivia has not been taking part in the team’s meets recently due to being hurt – she last competed on December 12 – and instead, she has been supporting her teammates from the sidelines. But her lack of competing hasn’t stopped her fans from showing up in droves to try to see her.

Previously, there were scarce details about what was putting her on the bench, however, the blonde beauty has now revealed that it’s her foot that has been wounded, as she posted a snap of herself wearing a boot to her Instagram Stories on Monday. It’s unclear when she will be able to compete again.

TikTok star and Gymnast Olivia Dunne showed off her stunning figure – and an injured foot – in a sparkly leotard on Monday morning, just days after it was announced that LSU gymnastics had hired a bodyguard to protect her

The college athlete, 20, has been making waves on the internet and in the gymnastics world recently - so much so, that security had to be increased at her gymnastic events after hoards of fans started 'swarming' her and her teammates

The college athlete, 20, has been making waves on the internet and in the gymnastics world recently – so much so, that security had to be increased at her gymnastic events after hoards of fans started ‘swarming’ her and her teammates

The star has become such a big sensation over the last few months that scores of excited young men have started to descend upon her meets - despite her not even being able to compete because of an injury

The star has become such a big sensation over the last few months that scores of excited young men have started to descend upon her meets - despite her not even being able to compete because of an injury

The star has become such a big sensation over the last few months that scores of excited young men have started to descend upon her meets – despite her not even being able to compete because of an injury 

Olivia (seen watching her team at their most recent match on January 13) has not been taking part in the team's meets recently due to being hurt, but instead, she has been supporting her teammates from the sidelines

Olivia (seen watching her team at their most recent match on January 13) has not been taking part in the team’s meets recently due to being hurt, but instead, she has been supporting her teammates from the sidelines

But her lack of competing hasn't stopped her fans from showing up in droves to try to see her

But her lack of competing hasn’t stopped her fans from showing up in droves to try to see her

She last competed on December 12 (seen). There are scarce details on her injury, but based on her recent Instagram post, it's her foot that's been wounded

She last competed on December 12 (seen). There are scarce details on her injury, but based on her recent Instagram post, it's her foot that's been wounded

She last competed on December 12 (seen). There are scarce details on her injury, but based on her recent Instagram post, it’s her foot that’s been wounded

It's unclear when she will be able to compete again. She is seen during the last time she competed, on December 12

It’s unclear when she will be able to compete again. She is seen during the last time she competed, on December 12

Olivia, originally from New Jersey, first started participating in gymnastics at the age of three - and she is now one of the top earners in collegiate sport

Olivia, originally from New Jersey, first started participating in gymnastics at the age of three – and she is now one of the top earners in collegiate sport

She has amassed a net worth of $2.3 million thanks to thanks to her athletic abilities, as well as her many lucrative sponsorship deals

She has amassed a net worth of $2.3 million thanks to thanks to her athletic abilities, as well as her many lucrative sponsorship deals

In addition to her success as an athlete, she has also found fame as a well-known star on TikTok and Instagram, where she regularly documents her her lavish lifestyle with her joint nine million followers

In addition to her success as an athlete, she has also found fame as a well-known star on TikTok and Instagram, where she regularly documents her her lavish lifestyle with her joint nine million followers 

But her stardom has become so intense recently that her supporters have started to wait outside of her meets in an attempt to get a glimpse of her - and things got so out of hand at one meet that her and her teammates needed police escorts

But her stardom has become so intense recently that her supporters have started to wait outside of her meets in an attempt to get a glimpse of her – and things got so out of hand at one meet that her and her teammates needed police escorts

Olivia, originally from New Jersey, first started participating in gymnastics at the age of three – and she is now one of the top earners in collegiate sport, amassing a net worth of $2.3 million thanks to thanks to her athletic abilities, as well as her many lucrative sponsorship deals.

In addition to her success as an athlete, she has also found fame as a well-known star on TikTok and Instagram, where she regularly documents her her lavish lifestyle with her joint nine million followers. 

But her stardom has become so intense recently that her supporters have started to wait outside of her meets in an attempt to get a glimpse of her – and things got so out of hand at one meet that her and her teammates needed police escorts to help them get to safety.

A group of 'rude' teenage boys mobbed her and the other gymnasts as they left a meet in Utah on January 6 - and they even yelled rude things to her teammates, calling them 'Livvy 2.0' and complaining that they weren't her

A group of ‘rude’ teenage boys mobbed her and the other gymnasts as they left a meet in Utah on January 6 – and they even yelled rude things to her teammates, calling them ‘Livvy 2.0’ and complaining that they weren’t her 

A group of ‘rude’ teenage boys mobbed her and the other gymnasts as they left a meet in Utah on January 6 – and they even yelled rude things to her teammates, calling them ‘Livvy 2.0’ and complaining that they weren’t her.

A video posted to Twitter by fellow gymnast Samantha Peszek showed the crowd of fans chanting Olivia’s name outside of the venue.

As Samantha exited, they started to heckle at her and aggressively scream things like, ‘Give us Livvy,’ and, ‘We want her,’ and ‘Where’s Livvy?’

‘When you leave the arena, but you’re not Livvy,’ she wrote in the video, adding in the caption, ‘This is actually so scary and disturbing and cringey. I’m embarrassed for them.’

It’s been said that officials were forced to move the Louisiana State University (LSU) team bus to avoid the rowdy crowd, while police were also called to help the athletes get to safety.

Afterwards, Olivia took to Twitter to beg her fans to be ‘respectful,’ writing, ‘I will always appreciate and love the support from you guys, but if you come to a meet, I want to ask you to please be respectful of the other gymnasts and the gymnastics community as we are just doing our job.’

The mother of a Utah gymnast named Jillian Hoffman claimed that her daughter was ‘swarmed ‘ by the teenage boys as they tried to make their way to their cars.

She wrote on social media, ‘As we were walking to the car the group swarmed my daughter and her teammate. They literally said to their faces, you are not Livvy but you will do, can we get a picture? The group also called my daughter Livvy 2.0. They were so rude and disrespectful.’

A video posted to Twitter by fellow gymnast Samantha Peszek showed the crowd of fans chanting Olivia's name outside of the venue

As Samantha exited, they started to heckle at her and aggressively scream things like, 'Give us Livvy,' and, 'We want her,' and 'Where's Livvy?'

A video posted to Twitter by fellow gymnast Samantha Peszek showed the crowd of fans chanting Olivia’s name outside of the venue. As Samantha exited, they started to heckle at her and aggressively scream things like, ‘Give us Livvy’

It's been said that officials were forced to move the Louisiana State University (LSU) team bus to avoid the rowdy crowd, while police were also called to help the athletes get to safety

It’s been said that officials were forced to move the Louisiana State University (LSU) team bus to avoid the rowdy crowd, while police were also called to help the athletes get to safety

Afterwards, Olivia took to Twitter to beg her fans to be 'respectful,' writing, 'I will always appreciate and love the support from you guys, but if you come to a meet, I want to ask you to please be respectful of the other gymnasts'

Afterwards, Olivia took to Twitter to beg her fans to be ‘respectful,’ writing, ‘I will always appreciate and love the support from you guys, but if you come to a meet, I want to ask you to please be respectful of the other gymnasts’

But how did Olivia become the new queen of gymnastics? Well, she fell in love with the sport when she was just a toddler

But how did Olivia become the new queen of gymnastics? Well, she fell in love with the sport when she was just a toddler 

Olivia said on her website that she first got involved in it because she wanted to wear a 'sparkly pink leotard,' adding, 'But, little did I know what an exciting future was ahead of me.' She is pictured as a child

The athlete said she was invited to try out for her local gym's pre-team at age five, and as soon as she started competing, she 'knew she had a passion for the sport.' She is pictured as a child

Olivia said on her website that she first got involved in it because she wanted to wear a ‘sparkly pink leotard,’ adding, ‘But, little did I know what an exciting future was ahead of me.’ She is pictured as a child

By the time she was nine, she had made it to regionals, and at age 10, she came in second place at the US Challenge. 'I was the youngest athlete in the country to qualify as a Jr. International Elite,' Olivia (pictured last year) continued in her bio

By the time she was nine, she had made it to regionals, and at age 10, she came in second place at the US Challenge. ‘I was the youngest athlete in the country to qualify as a Jr. International Elite,’ Olivia (pictured last year) continued in her bio

In 2016, Olivia won the Bresteyn's Elite Qualifier, as well as the KPAC Elite Qualifier. She also competed in the P&G Championships that year, where she earned two medals - on floor and beam. She is seen in 2022

In 2016, Olivia won the Bresteyn's Elite Qualifier, as well as the KPAC Elite Qualifier. She also competed in the P&G Championships that year, where she earned two medals - on floor and beam. She is seen in 2022

In 2016, Olivia won the Bresteyn’s Elite Qualifier, as well as the KPAC Elite Qualifier. She also competed in the P&G Championships that year, where she earned two medals – on floor and beam. She is seen in 2022

One year later, Olivia (pictured in 2022) was chosen for the USA National Team, and in 2018, she competed at the National Championships where she placed 18th all-around

One year later, Olivia (pictured in 2022) was chosen for the USA National Team, and in 2018, she competed at the National Championships where she placed 18th all-around 

She added her daughter and teammates were thankfully not ‘assaulted or harmed in anyway.’ 

Following the incident, LSU coach Jay Clark announced that the team had hired a security guard to travel with the girls to competitions for the rest of the season. 

‘That person will be in our hotel and outside our locker room and getting us to and from the bus at the venue,’ he told The Advocate/Times-Picayune. ‘[The officer] will be there to create a perimeter that keeps everybody safe.

‘Things have to change. We just can’t expose them. We’re looking at some policy changes that will give parents access at a different location to their daughters.’

But how did Olivia become the new queen of gymnastics? Well, she fell in love with the sport when she was just a toddler.

Olivia said on her website that she first got involved in it because she wanted to wear a ‘sparkly pink leotard,’ adding, ‘But, little did I know what an exciting future was ahead of me.’

The athlete said she was invited to try out for her local gym’s pre-team at age five, and as soon as she started competing, she ‘knew she had a passion for the sport.’

By the time she was nine, she had made it to regionals, and at age 10, she came in second place at the US Challenge.

‘During the 2013/2014 season I worked really hard to upgrade my skills and was the youngest athlete in the country to qualify as a Jr. International Elite,’ she continued in her bio.

In 2016, Olivia won the Bresteyn’s Elite Qualifier, as well as the KPAC Elite Qualifier. She also competed in the P&G Championships that year, where she earned two medals – on floor and beam.

One year later, she was chosen for the USA National Team, and in 2018, she competed at the National Championships where she placed 18th all-around.

However, in 2020 she stepped away from elite gymnastics to compete at the college level instead, accepted a full scholarship to Louisiana State University, where she began as a freshman in 2020

However, in 2020 she stepped away from elite gymnastics to compete at the college level instead, accepted a full scholarship to Louisiana State University, where she began as a freshman in 2020 

All the while, she grew her social media following by sharing an inside look at her life as an NCAA gymnast - and all the glamorous perks that come with it

All the while, she grew her social media following by sharing an inside look at her life as an NCAA gymnast - and all the glamorous perks that come with it

All the while, she grew her social media following by sharing an inside look at her life as an NCAA gymnast – and all the glamorous perks that come with it

The social media star soon became the most-followed collegiate athlete on the web - and she now has 6.7 million followers on TikTok and 2.7 million on Instagram

The social media star soon became the most-followed collegiate athlete on the web – and she now has 6.7 million followers on TikTok and 2.7 million on Instagram

But she wasn't allowed to make any money from her internet endeavors at first, due to the NCAA's strict policy about its members selling sponsorships

But she wasn’t allowed to make any money from her internet endeavors at first, due to the NCAA’s strict policy about its members selling sponsorships

That is, until June 30, 2021, when the organization changed its rules, announcing that it would allow its athletes to earn a profit off of their name, image, and likeness - a move that turned Olivia into a millionaire at only 18 years old

That is, until June 30, 2021, when the organization changed its rules, announcing that it would allow its athletes to earn a profit off of their name, image, and likeness – a move that turned Olivia into a millionaire at only 18 years old

However, in 2020 she stepped away from elite gymnastics to compete at the college level instead, accepted a full scholarship to Louisiana State University, where she began as a freshman in 2020.

All the while, she grew her social media following by sharing an inside look at her life as an NCAA gymnast – and all the glamorous perks that come with it. 

And while the social media star soon became the most-followed collegiate athlete on the web – she now has 6.7 million followers on TikTok and 2.7 million on Instagram – she wasn’t allowed to make any money from her internet endeavors at first, due to the NCAA’s strict policy about its members selling sponsorships.

That is, until June 30, 2021, when the organization changed its rules, announcing that it would allow its athletes to earn a profit off of their name, image, and likeness – a move that turned Olivia into a millionaire at only 18 years old, according to the New York Post.

In July 2021, she signed with Endeavor Talent Agency’s WME Sports, and in September of that year, she announced that she had landed a partnership with activewear brand Vuori – which Forbes reported was worth ‘mid-six figures.’

She was quickly flooded with opportunities from other companies who wanted to work with her, but she told the outlet that she was going to be picky, and only choose ones that were ‘authentic to her.’

In July 2021, she signed with Endeavor Talent Agency's WME Sports, and in September of that year, she announced that she had landed a partnership with activewear brand Vuori - which Forbes reported was worth 'mid-six figures'

In July 2021, she signed with Endeavor Talent Agency’s WME Sports, and in September of that year, she announced that she had landed a partnership with activewear brand Vuori – which Forbes reported was worth ‘mid-six figures’ 

She was quickly flooded with opportunities from other companies who wanted to work with her, but she told the outlet that she was going to be picky, and only choose ones that were 'authentic to her'

She was quickly flooded with opportunities from other companies who wanted to work with her, but she told the outlet that she was going to be picky, and only choose ones that were 'authentic to her'

She was quickly flooded with opportunities from other companies who wanted to work with her, but she told the outlet that she was going to be picky, and only choose ones that were ‘authentic to her’

'We have some of the same core values, and I think it's so great how they care about the environment,' she gushed of Vuori. 'They are also committed to happiness, and that's really important to me'

‘We have some of the same core values, and I think it’s so great how they care about the environment,’ she gushed of Vuori. ‘They are also committed to happiness, and that’s really important to me’

She added that while gymnastics is her number one, fashion has always also been another 'huge passion of hers.' She gushed: 'I love expressing myself through my style'

She added that while gymnastics is her number one, fashion has always also been another ‘huge passion of hers.’ She gushed: ‘I love expressing myself through my style’

She has since landed sponsorships with clothing companies like American Eagle and Forever 21 (seen), as well as the app Nate

She has since landed sponsorships with clothing companies like American Eagle and Forever 21, as well as the app Nate (seen)

She has since landed sponsorships with clothing companies like American Eagle and Forever 21 (left), as well as the app Nate (right)

‘We have some of the same core values, and I think it’s so great how they care about the environment,’ she gushed of Vuori. ‘They are also committed to happiness, and that’s really important to me.’

When it comes to the pressures that come along with having such a large following, the sports star and college student explained that she takes the responsibility very seriously

When it comes to the pressures that come along with having such a large following, the sports star and college student explained that she takes the responsibility very seriously

She has since landed sponsorships with clothing companies like American Eagle and Forever 21, as well as the app Nate. 

She added that while gymnastics is her number one, fashion has always also been another ‘huge passion of hers.’ 

‘Before college, my coach and I would design my own custom leotards for all my major competitions. I love expressing myself through my style,’ she revealed. 

‘Social media is always something that I’ve loved, and what I think is so great about the NIL rule change is that you can do whatever you love and make money off of it.’ 

When it comes to the pressures that come along with having such a large following, the sports star and college student explained that she takes the responsibility very seriously.

‘I just want to be a role model to young girls. I want to set a good example, and I want to send out a message that we’re more than just our sport. That’s very important to me,’ she told the outlet. 

‘I don’t try to put any pressure on myself, and I don’t try to compare myself to other people. I’m kind of just going with the flow, and it’s very exciting. 

‘Right now it’s all about trying to find a balance between school, social media and gymnastics. All them are top priorities in my life. 

‘I think it’s really a special time right now with the NIL change, especially for women’s sports because there’s not a lot of professional leagues after college for women.’

While speaking to the New York Times in November, she said she was especially proud of her earnings as a ‘woman in college sports.’

'I just want to be a role model to young girls. I want to set a good example, and I want to send out a message that we're more than just our sport. That's very important to me,' she told the outlet

‘I just want to be a role model to young girls. I want to set a good example, and I want to send out a message that we’re more than just our sport. That’s very important to me,’ she told the outlet

The athlete said she's trying to find a 'balance between school, social media and gymnastics,' adding, 'All them are top priorities in my life'

The athlete said she's trying to find a 'balance between school, social media and gymnastics,' adding, 'All them are top priorities in my life'

The athlete said she’s trying to find a ‘balance between school, social media and gymnastics,’ adding, ‘All them are top priorities in my life’

'I don't try to put any pressure on myself, and I don't try to compare myself to other people. I'm kind of just going with the flow, and it's very exciting,' she added

‘I don’t try to put any pressure on myself, and I don’t try to compare myself to other people. I’m kind of just going with the flow, and it’s very exciting,’ she added

On Instagram, she often shares of photos of herself enjoying a glamorous life of beach trips, pool days, and nights out with her friends, as well as snaps of herself driving luxury cars and taking extravagant trips

On Instagram, she often shares of photos of herself enjoying a glamorous life of beach trips, pool days, and nights out with her friends, as well as snaps of herself driving luxury cars and taking extravagant trips

On Instagram, she often shares of photos of herself enjoying a glamorous life of beach trips, pool days, and nights out with her friends, as well as snaps of herself driving luxury cars and taking extravagant trips

She also often shares images of herself hanging out with her teammates, posing in her gymnastics leotard, and practicing or preparing for meets

She also often shares images of herself hanging out with her teammates, posing in her gymnastics leotard, and practicing or preparing for meets

The athlete is certainly not afraid to show off her toned figure on social media - often sharing pictures and videos of herself in tiny dresses or revealing bikinis, but she previously slammed reports that her success has only come from her racy posts

The athlete is certainly not afraid to show off her toned figure on social media – often sharing pictures and videos of herself in tiny dresses or revealing bikinis, but she previously slammed reports that her success has only come from her racy posts

Her parents, David and Katherine Dunne, are very much supportive, and often accompany her at meets. She is seen with her parents and sister, Julz, who also attends LSU

Her parents, David and Katherine Dunne, are very much supportive, and often accompany her at meets. She is seen with her parents and sister, Julz, who also attends LSU

Her sister is also an athlete, and plays softball. The family is seen together in 2020

Her sister is also an athlete, and plays softball. The family is seen together in 2020

Her mother, Katherine Dunne, recently addressed rumors that 'the way Livvy dresses' means she 'deserves' to be treated with disrespect by her fans

Her mother, Katherine Dunne, recently addressed rumors that ‘the way Livvy dresses’ means she ‘deserves’ to be treated with disrespect by her fans

‘Seven figures – that is something I’m proud of. Especially since I’m a woman in college sports,’ she said. ‘There are no professional leagues for most women’s sports after college.’

When asked about her online persona by the New York Times, she explained that each person is entitled to 'show as much or as little' of themselves on the internet as 'they want'

 When asked about her online persona by the New York Times, she explained that each person is entitled to ‘show as much or as little’ of themselves on the internet as ‘they want’

On Instagram, she often shares of photos of herself enjoying a glamorous life of beach trips, pool days, and nights out with her friends, as well as snaps of herself driving luxury cars and taking extravagant trips. She even posted one picture that featured her holding up a wad of cash to the camera.

She also often shares images of herself hanging out with her teammates, posing in her gymnastics leotard, and practicing or preparing for meets.

On TikTok, she has become well-known for her dance and lip-sync videos. She also sometimes posts clips of herself responding to haters, as well as trying out other popular trends and filters.

The athlete is certainly not afraid to show off her toned figure on social media – often sharing pictures and videos of herself in tiny dresses or revealing bikinis, but she previously slammed reports that her success has only come from her racy posts. 

The Times released an article about the NCAA changing its rules about sponsorships back in November, titled, ‘New Endorsements for College Athletes Resurface an Old Concern: Sex Sells.’

In it, the publication spoke in detail about Olivia’s recent attention, and after it was published, she called it ‘too much.’

She shared a screenshot of the article to her Instagram Story, writing, ‘Is this too much?’ and tagging the outlet.

When asked about her online persona by the outlet, she explained that each person is entitled to ‘show as much or as little’ of themselves on the internet as ‘they want.’

Her mother, Katherine Dunne, also addressed rumors that ‘the way Livvy dresses’ means she ‘deserves’ to be treated with disrespect by her fans.

‘It is not OK to blame any athlete/celebrity when fan behavior crosses the line,’ she wrote on Twitter. ‘In a sport where all the girls wear nothing but leotards stop suggesting that how Livvy dresses means she deserves this in any way. Stop shaming girls for the behavior of boys.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk