This Dubai AI start-up wants to transform healthcare

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These are some of the problems that Melda Akin’s Dubai-based firm, Dimension14, wants to find solutions for. And she believes artificial intelligence, or AI, can help solve them.

The company is tackling these challenges for Diversified Integrated Sports Clinic (DISC) in Dubai’s Healthcare City.

Its job is to create an AI application that will help improve the way the clinic runs.

“They see thousands — more than thousands — of patients in a month. And every patient’s journey, medical history, communication styles, everything is different,” Akin says.

She says Dimension14 is working on an AI engine for scheduling patients and doctors — mapping out personalized journeys for both. An AI chat bot will help with communicating between them.

“Our aim is creating the product and the platform for all the doctors, patients and all parties getting their preferences, medical history expertise, and creating the best plan for everyone,” Akin adds.

Innovation incubator

Less than a year ago, Akin launched Dimension14 into Dubai’s burgeoning tech start-up scene, with the city positioning itself as a hub for the global entrepreneur.

“Dubai is a great hub. There are lots of initiatives and ideas and vision,” she says.

In 2018 over $900 million was invested in start-ups throughout the Middle East, according to a report from Magnitt, a Dubai-based start-up consultancy — with Dubai receiving 65% of those funds.
Melda Akin's start-up, Dimension14, is trying to transform the way healthcare is run with the use of AI.

But wherever they’re based, it’s notoriously difficult for start-ups to succeed.

“I think that people underestimate how unbelievably difficult and all-encompassing it is to start up a company,” says Christopher Schroeder, the author of “Startup Rising.” “You’re against all the odds to be able to do that, most start-ups fail,”

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“At the end of the day, getting up and running in those first couple of months and everything else, it’s about getting market traction, it’s about making a case overall. It’s about convincing investors in a cacophony of opportunities they have to invest,” Schroeder says.

Watch the video at the top of this article to learn more about Akin’s story.

Read more at CNN.com