The 100 greatest classic films ever and where you can watch them right now: Veteran critic BRIAN VINER’S movies everyone should see at least once – and they don’t include Marvel, Shawshank Redemption or Titanic

A lot of hard thinking went into this compilation of what I consider to be the 100 greatest films ever made. 

I’ve deliberately left out some of the mighty early silents, and there aren’t too many foreign-language films, because this has to be an accessible collection. 

Nevertheless, if I were asked by a visiting English-speaking alien to recommend 100 superb films made in the past 100 years which reflect all the different aspects of the human condition, this would be my complete list.

I don’t expect you to agree with it. In fact, I can practically hear the shrieks. Where’s The Shawshank Redemption? 

How can Star Wars rank lower than Shakespeare In Love? Excuse me, but you’ve forgotten everything Marvel ever made. Then there’s my friend Avril, who believes that the finest movie ever is Mamma Mia! She’ll be horrified to learn that it’s not in my top 100. The point, of course, is that film appreciation is entirely subjective. But I do hope this list will stimulate debate.

What is striking about it, so much so that I even surprised myself, is that it implies a decline in the quality of cinema. Only two films in my top 25 were made later than 1990, and that’s significant. Without a doubt, the 21st century has yielded some cracking movies. But how many will be cherished in decades to come? There are far more enduring classics from the 1940s, 50s and 60s than from the last 30 years, and that’s not me being an old film snob; it’s just how it is.

I see too many films these days that are perfectly watchable, yet instantly forgettable 

One reason is that some of the virtues of film-making, on which Hollywood immortals such as Frank Capra (It’s A Wonderful Life) and Billy Wilder (Some Like It Hot, Sunset Boulevard) built their careers, have been more or less forgotten. Chief among them is the art of concise storytelling. 

Alfred Hitchcock was a master of it. Yes, there were always long films. But their length served the narrative and sent us home happy, emotionally nourished even (usually with the help, it must be said, of an intermission). David Lean’s Lawrence Of Arabia, eighth on my list and getting on for four hours long, is a perfect example. These days, even rank mediocrity routinely weighs in at well over two hours.

So what are the qualities required to declare a film truly great? It must boast that holy trinity of fantastic direction, acting and writing. The plot should never meander purposelessly. Ideally, it should also have wonderful camera work, design, lighting, music and all the other elements that go into creating unforgettable cinema. I see too many films these days that are perfectly watchable, yet instantly forgettable.

I’ve included three documentaries, incidentally, which qualify under slightly different rules. Yet here are 100 films which I believe everyone should see at least once in their lifetime, and all of which should make you laugh, cry, gasp or think. Maybe all four, in certain cases. I hope my list will remind you of some proper cinematic treats, or better still, introduce you to them. Happy viewing!

All 100 films are available to buy, rent or stream free on various platforms so you can watch them right now.

1. The Godfather (1972)

Al Pacino as Michael Corleone in The Godfather, directed by Francis Ford Coppola

How often have you heard someone say of a film, ‘The book’s better’? Mario Puzo went to his grave knowing that Francis Ford Coppola’s adaptation of his doorstop of a novel about the Corleones, one of New York’s five Mafia families, had turned that notion upside down (though I dare say the resulting fame and fortune were compensation enough). I must have watched the movie (starring Al Pacino and Marlon Brando) 50 times and for me it is the greatest film ever made, better than its own brilliant sequel, and a work of proper genius. Paramount+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

2. The Wizard Of Oz (1939)

The Wizard Of Oz featuring Judy Garland (left)

The Wizard Of Oz featuring Judy Garland (left)

 

Enduringly enchanting, this is, for my money, the greatest screen fantasy ever made. Yes, its back story is troubling to say the least, with the teenage Judy Garland being plied with amphetamines on set to keep her alert, and degenerate Munchkins running amok. But what a film, deservedly the most-seen picture of all time and, according to a recent poll, also the most influential (narrowly ahead of Star Wars and Psycho). Amazon, buy or rent on Apple, Rakuten TV

3. Psycho (1960)

Janet Leigh as Marion Crane in the shower scene from the 1960 thriller Psycho

Janet Leigh as Marion Crane in the shower scene from the 1960 thriller Psycho

There was cinema before the taboo-busting Psycho, and cinema after. But people took showers before Psycho, and baths after. Hitchcock knew the likely impact of the grisly bathroom murder in his incomparably gripping psychological thriller, in which Janet Leigh as a secretary with a grubby secret of her own falls victim to Anthony Perkins’s creepy killer. That’s why the scene required 78 camera set-ups and almost a quarter of his shooting schedule. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

4. Jaws (1975)

Jaws, directed by Steven Spielberg

Jaws, directed by Steven Spielberg

 

Steven Spielberg’s masterpiece had the same chilling effect on my generation that Psycho (see No 3) had on the one before. True, the mechanical shark – which the director nicknamed Bruce, after his lawyer – hasn’t aged especially well. But even with all the bells and whistles film-makers have at their disposal now, none could tell this story (starring Roy Scheider) like Spielberg, not even 30 at the time and already a master of his medium. Netflix, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

5. Some Like It Hot (1959)

From left: Tony Curtis, Evelyn Moriarty and Jack Lemmon in Some Like It Hot

From left: Tony Curtis, Evelyn Moriarty and Jack Lemmon in Some Like It Hot

 

Billy Wilder’s list of credits as both writer and director is astonishing. And this stands at the summit of them, a radiant comedy in which Wilder, with the very considerable assistance of Tony Curtis, Marilyn Monroe and Jack Lemmon, spins a sublimely silly yarn – about two musicians posing as women so they can join an all-girl band and shake off the Chicago gangsters on their tail – into pure gold. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

6. Casablanca (1942)

Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in Casablanca

Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in Casablanca

 

I last re-watched it just a few years ago, anxious in case it hadn’t dated well. Yet, despite being in black and white, it’s utterly evergreen. Bogart at his coolest, Bergman at her loveliest, Peter Lorre at his shiftiest, oodles of romance, suspense, even comedy, and a superb screenplay – for me it vies with director Michael Curtiz’s hit The Adventures Of Robin Hood as the quintessence of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

7. One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest is set during the early 1960s in the security ward of a state mental hospital

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest is set during the early 1960s in the security ward of a state mental hospital

Kirk Douglas tried for years to finance an adaptation of Ken Kesey’s novel about mental health, set in a psychiatric hospital. He passed on the rights to his son, who produced the second movie ever to win all five major Oscars (see the first at No 89). Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

8. Lawrence Of Arabia (1962)

David Lean's Lawrence Of Arabia starred Peter O'Toole in the title role

David Lean’s Lawrence Of Arabia starred Peter O’Toole in the title role 

 

Albert Finney was originally cast to play TE Lawrence, then fired. Next, Marlon Brando was offered the part. But it’s impossible now to imagine anyone but a piercingly blueeyed Peter O’Toole in the title role, in David Lean’s aweinspiring, Oscar-festooned epic set during the First World War. After the premiere, Noel Coward famously remarked if O’Toole had been any prettier, they’d have had to call it Florence Of Arabia. Netflix, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

9. The Graduate (1967)

Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft in The Graduate

Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft in The Graduate

When the direction, writing, casting, acting and music are all as good as they can be, you have cinematic perfection. That’s how I look on this treasure of a coming-of-age comedy, the supreme accomplishment of lots of illustrious careers – including those of director Mike Nichols and star Dustin Hoffman. It’s also the favourite film of two of my children. They have fabulous taste. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

10. Citizen Kane (1941)

Citizen Kane directed by Orson Welles in 1941

Citizen Kane directed by Orson Welles in 1941

 

Orson Welles was only in his mid-20s when he co-wrote, directed and starred in this drama inspired by the life of media baron William Randolph Hearst. It takes a bit of watching now but it’s worth persevering to see how it changed the way people made films, and why so many polls have deemed it the best of all time. BBC iPlayer, buy or rent on Apple, Sky, Rakuten TV

11. Bonnie And Clyde (1967)

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) starring Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) starring Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker

 

Yes, it romanticised two killers, unforgettably played by Faye Dunaway and the film’s producer, Warren Beatty. In fact, Beatty had originally wanted Bob Dylan to play Clyde while his lover Leslie Caron, his ex-lover Natalie Wood and his sister Shirley MacLaine were all considered for the role of Bonnie before the little- known actress Dunaway got the gig. As it turned out, the casting was perfect. And Arthur Penn’s picture – ineffably stylish and incorrigibly violent – changed the cinematic landscape. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

12. Apocalypse Now (1979)

Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now is often described as the greatest war film ever made

Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now is often described as the greatest war film ever made

 

Francis Ford Coppola’s thrillingly bold take on the Vietnam War, starring Marlon Brando (who was paid a million dollars a week for three weeks’ work), was inspired by Joseph Conrad’s novel Heart Of Darkness. It’s very often described as the greatest war film ever made, and I can’t honestly argue with that. It took so long to reach the screen that industry wags dubbed it ‘Apocalypse When?’… but it was worth the wait. ITVX Premium, buy or rent on Apple, Sky, Rakuten TV

13. Singin’ In The Rain (1952)

Singin’ In The Rain (1952) is a musical romantic comedy set in 1927

Singin’ In The Rain (1952) is a musical romantic comedy set in 1927

It’s hard – impossible even – to think of a picture more irresistibly effervescent than this musical romantic comedy. The 19-year-old Debbie Reynolds is the love interest for Gene Kelly. Set in 1927, it’s another example of Hollywood telling stories about itself, with one of the all-time great song-and-dance routines in Donald O’Connor’s unforgettable Make ’Em Laugh. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

14. The Apartment (1960)

Jack Lemmon as C.C. Baxter and Shirley MacLaine as Fran Kubelik in The Apartment

Jack Lemmon as C.C. Baxter and Shirley MacLaine as Fran Kubelik in The Apartment

 

Jack Lemmon was never better, not even in Some Like It Hot, than as nerdy insurance man CC Baxter, who lets his sleazy colleagues use his flat for extramarital liaisons. Nor, for that matter, was Shirley MacLaine ever more beguiling than as the elevator girl with whom he falls in love. Director and co-writer Billy Wilder got the idea from Brief Encounter, but this unsurpassably witty, bittersweet romcom seems a long way from a provincial English railway station. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

15. Shoah (1985)

Shoah (1985) - Claude Lanzmann’s epic, nine-hour history of the Holocaust

Shoah (1985) – Claude Lanzmann’s epic, nine-hour history of the Holocaust

 

If no other documentary had ever been made, the medium would have been worth inventing for this film alone. Claude Lanzmann’s epic, nine-hour history of the Holocaust (for which the Hebrew word is ‘Shoah’) uses dozens of eyewitness accounts (from those who perpetrated its horrors as well as survivors), filmed at sites across Poland including some of the former extermination camps. Simply put, it is one of the mightiest and most important accomplishments in cinematic history. BFI Player

16. Modern Times (1936)

Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times (1936)

Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times (1936)

 

I first saw Charlie Chaplin’s glorious industrialisation satire with my parents on a wintry afternoon in Athens, when I was 11. I fell in love with it instantly, realising, among lots of Greeks laughing fit to burst, that great slapstick comedy is the most joyful of universal languages. The famous assembly-line scene on its own is a triumph of creativity no less, in my view, than the best bits of Hamlet, The Marriage Of Figaro, or the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Buy or rent on Apple

17. Brief Encounter (1945)

Might Brief Encounter (1945) be the most romantic film of all time?

Might Brief Encounter (1945) be the most romantic film of all time?

Might this be the most romantic film of all time? I grant you there are other contenders, such as Casablanca, but none of them have Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard in the lead roles, exquisitely clipped English accents, Carnforth railway station (doubling as Milford), Stanley Holloway as the station master and Joyce Carey running the café. Not to mention Noel Coward’s screenplay, David Lean’s wonderful direction and a Rachmaninov score. This truly is Sunday afternoon perfection. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon

18. Double Indemnity (1944)

Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1944)

Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1944)

 

Billy Wilder’s gripping film noir starring Fred MacMurray as an impressionable insurance salesman and Barbara Stanwyck as the deadliest of femme fatales prompted Alfred Hitchcock to say ‘the two most important words in motion pictures are Billy and Wilder’. Its failure to win an Oscar, though nominated for seven, is a travesty. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

19. The Banshees Of Inisherin (2022)

The Banshees of Inisherin (2022) stars Colin Farrell, right, and Brendan Gleeson

The Banshees of Inisherin (2022) stars Colin Farrell, right, and Brendan Gleeson

 

Every Top 20 needs an element of surprise and here’s mine: not everyone adored Martin McDonagh’s black comedy but I saw it three times, relishing an absolute masterpiece of character-driven storytelling. Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson were both magnificent as two old friends who fall out in an island community off the west coast of Ireland in the 1920s, but they were matched every step of the way by Barry Keoghan and Kerry Condon – not to mention the donkey. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

20. Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs was a huge commercial success

Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs was a huge commercial success

 

The first full-length animated feature film is an enduring classic, and maybe the ultimate statement of Walt Disney’s genius. There was plenty of apprehension about the public’s appetite for the project. Would anyone want to sit through an 83-minute cartoon? But of course they did, in their droves. It was a colossal hit. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

21. The Sound Of Music (1965)

The Sound Of Music starred Julie Andrews in the leading role

The Sound Of Music starred Julie Andrews in the leading role

OK, so it’s not everyone’s cup of tea (a drink with jam and bread). But I’m not ashamed to admit that I adore every cheesy minute, and once queued for over an hour at the Venice Film Festival to hear Julie Andrews reminiscing about it. I last watched it over Christmas with my wife and grown-up children, and we all agreed for the umpteenth time that it’s an utterly peerless treat of a musical. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

22. Kind Hearts And Coronets (1949)

Kind Hearts And Coronets (1949)

Kind Hearts And Coronets (1949)

If the recent release Saltburn did nothing else, its derivative plot reminded us of this magnificent Ealing comedy, which in my view is the best of the lot, despite stiff competition. It’s the perfect treat for a cold, wet afternoon, and while Dennis Price is splendid as the sly charmer who knocks off eight distant relatives in dastardly pursuit of an inheritance, the film belongs to the great Alec Guinness, who unforgettably plays all eight of them. Channel 4, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

23. The Silence Of The Lambs (1991)

The Silence Of The Lambs was directed by Jonathan Demme

The Silence Of The Lambs was directed by Jonathan Demme 

Of all the great movie ‘entrances’, maybe the most startling is by a character who is immobile. As imprisoned cannibalistic serial killer Hannibal Lecter, Anthony Hopkins practically defines the word ‘chilling’ and it’s a measure of how good Jodie Foster is as his rookie FBI interrogator Clarice Starling that her performance is not eclipsed by his. Amazon Prime Video, buy or rent on Apple, Sky, Rakuten TV

24. The Maltese Falcon (1941)

Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Falcon

Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Falcon

John Huston’s directorial debut, this adaptation of the Dashiel Hammett novel saw Humphrey Bogart deliver an even better performance than in Casablanca. It was this film that defined his alpha-male image for his entire career. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

25. The French Connection (1971)

Director William Friedkin's 1971 The French Connection

Director William Friedkin’s 1971 The French Connection

The greatest of all movie car chases was filmed on New York’s streets, avoiding real traffic and pedestrians. Hiding on the back seat, director William Friedkin himself held the camera (on the basis that his underlings were married with kids, and he wasn’t). But even without the chase scene, this gritty thriller based on a true story, in which two cops (Gene Hackman and Roy Scheider) try to nail a slippery heroin smuggler, is a superb piece of work. BBC iPlayer, Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

26. Alien (1979)

Alien (1979) - a sci-fi horror thriller starring Sigourney Weaver

Alien (1979) – a sci-fi horror thriller starring Sigourney Weaver

 What a list of credits director Ridley Scott has, stretching back even further than this incredible sci-fi horror thriller starring Sigourney Weaver, about a deadly extra-terrestrial creature at large on a spaceship. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

27. Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1969)

Robert Redford and Paul Newman in Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid

Robert Redford and Paul Newman in Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid

 

The greatest ‘buddy movie’ ever made? I think so. George Roy Hill’s unsurpassably entertaining Western stars Robert Redford and Paul Newman as the dishiest rogues of all time. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

28. Annie Hall (1977)

Woody Allen's Annie Hall (1977)

Woody Allen’s Annie Hall (1977) 

Woody Allen has never improved on this gloriously witty, idiosyncratic romcom that features Diane Keaton and Allen himself, both on top form. At the 50th Academy Awards it beat Star Wars to Best Picture and Keaton won Best Actress. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

29. Raging Bull (1980)

Robert De Niro in Raging Bull

Robert De Niro in Raging Bull

Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese have made ten films together of which this, about the life of boxing champion Jake LaMotta (De Niro), is arguably the very best. It’s as brutal a sporting drama as you’ll ever see. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

30. Pulp Fiction (1994)

John Travolta and Samuel L Jackson in Pulp Fiction

John Travolta and Samuel L Jackson in Pulp Fiction

If Quentin Tarantino does indeed call it a day after just ten movies, this will surely remain the pick of them. The graphic violence isn’t for everyone but there is so much to cherish, from the ingenious narrative structure to a brilliant script and a standout cast including John Travolta and Samuel L Jackson. ITVX, Netflix, Paramount+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

31. It’s A Wonderful Life (1946)

It’s A Wonderful Life, directed by Frank Capra

It’s A Wonderful Life, directed by Frank Capra

The joys of Frank Capra’s heartwarming Christmas classic are undimmed by all the TV showings it gets. After all, how could we ever tire of James Stewart’s pitch-perfect performance as the kind-hearted small-town banker who, on the brink of ruin, is saved from ending his own life by his guardian angel, Clarence? Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

32. The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp (1943)

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp is a 1943 British romantic-war film written, produced and directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp is a 1943 British romantic-war film written, produced and directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger

The title character, lifted from a cartoon strip, is seen in flashback as a young officer in a film that told such stark truths about soldiering, Churchill tried to ban it. ITVX Premium, buy or rent on Apple, BFI Player

33. The General (1926)

The General (1926) is Buster Keaton’s sublime dramatisation of a military raid during the US Civil War

The General (1926) is Buster Keaton’s sublime dramatisation of a military raid during the US Civil War

The crowning glory of the golden age of slapstick is Buster Keaton’s sublime dramatisation of a military raid during the US Civil War, in which Union soldiers commandeer a train called The General, igniting a frantic chase across the South. Amazon Prime Video, buy or rent on Apple, Curzon Home Cinema

34. The Bridge On The River Kwai (1957)

The Bridge On The River Kwai (1957) directed by David Lean

The Bridge On The River Kwai (1957) directed by David Lean

Memories of the construction of the Burma Railway by Allied POWs and others were still vivid when David Lean’s film came out, which doubtless made it painful viewing for some. A superb Alec Guinness won one of the film’s seven Oscars, but reportedly only got the part because Charles Laughton didn’t fancy the heat. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

35. There Will Be Blood (2007)

Daniel Day-Lewis, right, is extraordinary as ruthless oil man Daniel Plainview

Daniel Day-Lewis, right, is extraordinary as ruthless oil man Daniel Plainview

Paul Thomas Anderson’s thrillingly singular period masterpiece – which he dedicated to his mentor, Robert Altman, who died while it was being edited – is arguably the finest film of this century so far. Daniel Day-Lewis is extraordinary as ruthless oil man Daniel Plainview. ITVX, Paramount+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

36. Taxi Driver (1976)

Jodie Foster in Taxi Driver

Jodie Foster in Taxi Driver

Martin Scorsese was heavily influenced by John Ford’s The Searchers when he made this intense psychological thriller about a troubled Vietnam veteran (Robert De Niro) who wants to rescue a girl (Jodie Foster), who doesn’t want to be rescued. The score is the last by the great film composer Bernard Herrmann. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

37. The Deer Hunter (1978)

The Deer Hunter (1978)

The Deer Hunter (1978)

A five-Oscar haul, including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor for Christopher Walken, hardly conveys just what a powerful movie this was, and still is. It was daring, too, both in the way it depicted the dehumanising horror of war, and by focusing on the lives of three Pennsylvania steelworkers even before they went to Vietnam. ITVX Premium, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

38. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey, directed by Stanley Kubrick

2001: A Space Odyssey, directed by Stanley Kubrick

The beginning of last year’s hit Barbie, as a doll is tossed through the air, is a direct steal from Stanley Kubrick’s sci-fi epic, which has influenced film-makers ever since. While I find it a hard watch these days, there are scenes that truly still make the head spin. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV, BFI Player

39. Seven Samurai (1954)

Akira Kurosawa’s ground-breaking film about mercenaries hired to defend a village from bandits in 16th-century Japan

Akira Kurosawa’s ground-breaking film about mercenaries hired to defend a village from bandits in 16th-century Japan

The Magnificent Seven is a fine movie, but it’s not on a par with the Japanese-language masterpiece that inspired it, Akira Kurosawa’s ground-breaking film about mercenaries hired to defend a village from bandits in 16th-century Japan. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, BFI Player

40. Vertigo (1958)

Vertigo, directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Vertigo, directed by Alfred Hitchcock

For me, Psycho is Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpiece, but it is run close by this psychological thriller about obsession. James Stewart plays a former detective, forced to retire because of his fear of heights, who is hired by an old friend to follow the man’s wife (Kim Novak). Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

41. All About Eve (1950)

Bette Davis in All About Eve

Bette Davis in All About Eve

Many of you will have felt short-changed by the film options on long-haul flights. But what a joy, on my last trip across the Atlantic, to be offered Joseph L Mankiewicz’s engrossing tale of an ageing Broadway star (Bette Davis) confronting her fading status, with all its soaring wit and sky-high fabulousness. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

42. Top Hat (1935)

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire in Top Hat

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire in Top Hat

No list of great films can omit Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. In this screwball comedy they are at their spellbinding best. Astaire plays a famous US tap dancer visiting London, with Rogers as the fellow hotel guest he falls hard for. Their dance routines are breathtaking. BBC iPlayer, buy or rent on Apple

43. Bicycle Thieves (1948)

Vittorio De Sica’s stunning and heart-rending Italian-language film about the challenges of an urban existence just after the war

Vittorio De Sica’s stunning and heart-rending Italian-language film about the challenges of an urban existence just after the war

The roles of a cash-strapped father and son, searching Rome for the stolen bike without which the man is unable to work, were given to non-professional actors. That adds a beguiling dash of realism to Vittorio De Sica’s stunning and heart-rending Italian-language film about the challenges of an urban existence just after the war. Buy or rent on Apple, Sky, Rakuten TV

44. On The Waterfront (1954)

Elia Kazan’s rousing film about union corruption won eight Academy Awards

Elia Kazan’s rousing film about union corruption won eight Academy Awards

Elia Kazan’s rousing film about union corruption won eight Academy Awards and contains one of the most quoted of all lines (‘I coulda been a contender’). It also has Marlon Brando at his smouldering best, Eva Marie Saint on her film debut and a Leonard Bernstein score. Buy or rent on Apple, Sky, Amazon, Rakuten TV

45. Nashville (1975)

Nashville (1975) is a sprawling satire on US politics and culture, set during an election campaign in the home of country music

Nashville (1975) is a sprawling satire on US politics and culture, set during an election campaign in the home of country music

I collect original film posters and the Nashville one is among my favourites, as cheeky and jaunty as the film itself. Utterly of its time yet somehow timeless, it is a sprawling satire on US politics and culture, set during an election campaign in the home of country music. Robert Altman made some marvelous and memorable films, but none better. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Rakuten TV

46. Rome, Open City (1945)

Rome, Open City (1945)

Rome, Open City (1945)

There is so much I adore about this incredible film, a classic of Italian ‘neorealism’. Filmed by Roberto Rossellini in a Rome ravaged by war, it was inspired by the true story of a priest who helped Italian resistance fighters. BFI Player, buy or rent on Apple

47. Duck Soup (1933)

Duck Soup (1933) with Groucho Marx

Duck Soup (1933) with Groucho Marx 

The Marx Brothers’ finest movie sees mayhem ensue as Groucho, in the role of Rufus T Firefly, becomes dictator of Freedonia. The mirror routine, in which Harpo pretends to be Groucho’s reflection, is one of my all-time top five comedy scenes. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

48. The Searchers (1956)

John Ford’s story of an embittered old soldier (John Wayne) looking for his niece (Natalie Wood), who’s been abducted by Comanches

John Ford’s story of an embittered old soldier (John Wayne) looking for his niece (Natalie Wood), who’s been abducted by Comanches

Arguably the greatest Western ever made, and the most influential, John Ford’s story of an embittered old soldier (John Wayne) looking for his niece (Natalie Wood), who’s been abducted by Comanches, incredibly mustered not a single Oscar nomination. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

49. The Conversation (1974)

Gene Hackman gives his finest performance as Harry, a lonely surveillance expert who is hired to eavesdrop on a couple and uncovers a murder plot

Gene Hackman gives his finest performance as Harry, a lonely surveillance expert who is hired to eavesdrop on a couple and uncovers a murder plot

In Francis Ford Coppola’s tense, taut thriller, Gene Hackman gives his finest performance as Harry, a lonely surveillance expert who is hired to eavesdrop on a couple and uncovers a murder plot. Coppola said he based Harry partly on himself. Paramount+

50. Dr Strangelove (1964)

Stanley Kubrick’s Cold War masterpiece Dr Strangelove (1964)

Stanley Kubrick’s Cold War masterpiece Dr Strangelove (1964)

Peter Sellers plays three characters, all to comic perfection, in Stanley Kubrick’s Cold War masterpiece. Sterling Hayden is a deranged air force general who plans a nuclear attack on the Soviets partly because he blames them for his impotence. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

51. Boyhood (2014)

Ellar Coltrane in Richard Linklater's Boyhood

Ellar Coltrane in Richard Linklater’s Boyhood

Richard Linklater filmed this ambitious coming-of-age story over 12 years so actor Ellar Coltrane would age naturally from six to 18. It’s a remarkable piece of film-making. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

52. Schindler’s List (1993)

Steven Spielberg's 1993 Schindler’s List

Steven Spielberg’s 1993 Schindler’s List

During the filming, a real Holocaust survivor visited the set and was traumatised by the sight of Ralph Fiennes in uniform as he looked so much like his character, the depraved concentration camp commandant Amon Goeth. Director Steven Spielberg got everything right in telling this hugely affecting Holocaust story. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

53. The Producers (1967)

The Producers (1967) is a story about a pair of crooks who conceive a get-rich-quick scheme involving a flop of a stage musical called Springtime For Hitler

The Producers (1967) is a story about a pair of crooks who conceive a get-rich-quick scheme involving a flop of a stage musical called Springtime For Hitler

Mel Brooks’s original story – his directorial debut – of a pair of crooks who conceive a get-rich-quick scheme involving a flop of a stage musical called Springtime For Hitler, which unexpectedly turns out to be a hit, is pricelessly funny. ITVX Premium, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

54. No Country For Old Men (2007)

No Country For Old Men is a screen adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's novel

No Country For Old Men is a screen adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel 

If I were listing the greatest screen baddies, Javier Bardem’s menacing hitman in the Coen brothers’ swaggering adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel would be up there with Hannibal Lecter and the Child Catcher from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. But there’s much else to love in this glorious thriller about a hunter (Josh Brolin) who finds a briefcase stuffed with money. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

55. Monty Python’s Life Of Brian (1979)

Monty Python's Life Of Brian (1979) starring Michael Palin

Monty Python’s Life Of Brian (1979) starring Michael Palin

It came out just in time for me to be teased at school, but now I’m proud to share a name with the Python team’s most inspired creation, the ordinary bloke mistaken for the Messiah in this parody of religious fanaticism. Even the minor players (Neil Innes as A Weedy Samaritan, Sue Jones-Davies as Judith Iscariot) make you smile. Netflix, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon

56. Tokyo Story (1953)

A story of an ageing country-dwelling couple who go to Tokyo to visit their grown-up children

A story of an ageing country-dwelling couple who go to Tokyo to visit their grown-up children

Last year’s 70th anniversary re-release brought this wonderful Japanese-language film back to the silver screen. It’s a meticulously constructed, profoundly moving story of an ageing country-dwelling couple who go to Tokyo to visit their grown-up children. A gem. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon

57. The Elephant Man (1980)

John Hurt plays the grotesquely deformed Joseph Merrick in David Lynch’s heart-rending biopic The Elephant Man (1980)

John Hurt plays the grotesquely deformed Joseph Merrick in David Lynch’s heart-rending biopic The Elephant Man (1980)

John Hurt could be a prickly fellow, as I once found out when I interviewed him. But he was a brilliant actor, and his performance as the grotesquely deformed Joseph Merrick in David Lynch’s heart-rending biopic is stellar. I could see why Robert De Niro (for Raging Bull) pipped him to the Oscar, but they really should have dished out two that year. ITVX Premium, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

58. Deliverance (1972)

Deliverance (1972) is an enthralling, unsettling thriller

Deliverance (1972) is an enthralling, unsettling thriller 

It has always tickled me that the definitive hillbilly movie was made by the quintessentially English director John Boorman. It’s an enthralling, unsettling thriller, with the ‘Duelling Banjos’ scene (in fact a banjo and a guitar) as a bonus. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky Store, Rakuten TV

59. Apollo 11 (2019)

Apollo 11 (2019) portrays the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, the first spaceflight from which men walked on the Moon

Apollo 11 (2019) portrays the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, the first spaceflight from which men walked on the Moon

We all know people who insist the moon landings were a hoax. They should be made to watch Douglas Todd Miller’s awe-inspiring film, the definitive factual account, distilled from hours of visual footage and audio archive. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

60. What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? (1962)

Joan Crawford and Bette Davis play ageing sisters who hate each other

Joan Crawford and Bette Davis play ageing sisters who hate each other 

Joan Crawford and Bette Davis play ageing sisters, both showbiz veterans, who hate each other. It’s crazily melodramatic but the casting makes it unforgettable. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Rakuten TV

61. Spartacus (1960)

Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus (1960)

Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus (1960)

Stanley Kubrick was just 32 when he was handed the reins to this lavish Roman saga. It’s sumptuous – the very definition of epic and a high point in the long career of Kirk Douglas. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

62. Toy Story (1995)

Toy Story characters Woody and Buzz Lightyear

Toy Story characters Woody and Buzz Lightyear

What a joy it was to meet cowboy doll Woody, space ranger Buzz Lightyear and their pals. No other Pixar film will ever displace this in my heart. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

63. The Lives Of Others (2006)

The Lives Of Others (2006)

The Lives Of Others (2006) 

This German-language tale of a mid-1980s surveillance operation by the East German secret police is a cracking thriller but also shows how totalitarianism warps humanity – and how humanity can fight back. Truly brilliant. Buy or rent on Sky, Curzon Home Cinema

64. The Good, The Bad And The Ugly (1966)

Clint Eastwood in The Good, The Bad And The Ugly (1966)

Clint Eastwood in The Good, The Bad And The Ugly (1966)

‘The greatest film of all time,’ according to Quentin Tarantino. I wouldn’t go that far, but I can’t think of a better spaghetti Western than Sergio Leone’s Civil War-era epic, or of any movie more suited to Clint Eastwood’s favoured film persona: the dangerous, laconic hero. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

65. West Side Story (1961)

Robert Wise's 1961 West Side Story won ten Academy Awards on its release

Robert Wise’s 1961 West Side Story won ten Academy Awards on its release

Steven Spielberg’s 2021 remake wasn’t half bad, but nothing will ever beat the original, Robert Wise’s exuberant, pitch-perfect adaptation of the Broadway musical. It won an incredible ten Academy Awards and remains the most garlanded musical in Oscars history. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

66. The Third Man (1949)

The British Film Institute declared The Third Man (1949) the greatest British film ever made

The British Film Institute declared The Third Man (1949) the greatest British film ever made

In 1999 the British Film Institute declared this the greatest British film ever made. A murder mystery set in post-war Vienna, starring Orson Welles and Joseph Cotten, it was written by Graham Greene. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Rakuten TV

67. Shakespeare In Love (1998)

Joseph Fiennes and Gwyneth Paltrow in Shakespeare In Love

Joseph Fiennes and Gwyneth Paltrow in Shakespeare In Love

Even though it won seven Oscars, I always feel John Madden’s clever, charming romantic comedy is underrated. With a raft of exquisite performances, it bursts with wit and originality. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

68. His Girl Friday (1940)

His Girl Friday (1940)

His Girl Friday (1940)

One of the great screwball comedies, this stands out not because of the cast (Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell) but thanks to its relentlessly witty script. ITVX, Amazon Prime Video, buy or rent on Apple

69. Henry V (1944)

Laurence Olivier as Henry V

Laurence Olivier as Henry V

Director Laurence Olivier was told by Winston Churchill to shape his film adaptation of Shakespeare’s play into a boost to national morale. After seeing it, Churchill was described as ‘ecstatic’. Olivier excelled in the title role. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon

70. The Shining (1980)

Stanley Kubrick's 1980 horror film The Shining

Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror film The Shining

Stanley Kubrick hated flying, so the interiors of the hotel where this scary horror film is set were created at Elstree Studios, not in the Rockies. But the scares and the brilliance of Jack Nicholson as a deranged psychopath are very real. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV, BFI Player

71. Chinatown (1974)

A thriller, starring Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway

A thriller, starring Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway

I’ve still barely recovered from watching Roman Polanski’s ghastly latest feature, The Palace, last year. But in his prime he was a fantastic film-maker. And this thriller, starring Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway, is a fantastic film. Paramount+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

72. Zulu (1964)

Michael Caine in Zulu

Michael Caine in Zulu

At the premiere of this epic (below), about the Battle of Rorke’s Drift when 150 British soldiers repelled 4,000 Zulus, two people left in disgust. One was actor Jack Hawkins, who felt the director had made his character, Otto Witt, look stupid. The other was the daughter of Henry Hook, played by James Booth as a drunk, when in fact he’d been teetotal. Buy or rent on Apple, Rakuten TV, Sky

73. Sunset Boulevard (1950)

Sunset Boulevard (1950) starring Gloria Swanson as a fading silent-film star

Sunset Boulevard (1950) starring Gloria Swanson as a fading silent-film star

Billy Wilder’s lacerating black comedy is about a fading silent-film star, played by Gloria Swanson who was exactly that in real life. ITVX, Paramount+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

74. City Lights (1931)

Charlie Chaplin’s silent masterpiece City Lights (1931)

Charlie Chaplin’s silent masterpiece City Lights (1931)

The boxing scene might still be the greatest piece of slapstick of all time. Charlie Chaplin’s silent masterpiece is worth watching for that alone, but there’s so much else to cherish here. Buy or rent on Apple

75. Gone With The Wind (1939)

Victor Fleming’s melodramatic romance Gone With The Wind (1939)

Victor Fleming’s melodramatic romance Gone With The Wind (1939)

Victor Fleming’s melodramatic romance, set during the US Civil War, starred Darjeeling-born, Roehampton-educated Vivien Leigh as the ultimate Southern belle, Scarlett O’Hara. Its scale and ambition are still mind-boggling. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

76. The Best Years Of Our Lives (1946)

The Best Years Of Our Lives (1946)

The Best Years Of Our Lives (1946)

A handsome drama about three US soldiers from strikingly different backgrounds, all returning from the Second World War to their home town in the Midwest, this is a wonderfully crafted story, compellingly told and eternally relevant. Amazon Prime Video

77. Ben Hur (1959)

Ben Hur (1959) won 11 Oscars

Ben Hur (1959) won 11 Oscars 

Its haul of 11 Oscars was a record, justifying the vast budget of more than $15million, another record at the time, much of which was splurged on the biggest sets ever created. With Charlton Heston in the title role, this is swords-and-sandals film-making at its finest. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

78. Get Out (2017)

Jordan Peele’s directorial debut Get Out (2017)

Jordan Peele’s directorial debut Get Out (2017)

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner?, Stanley Kramer’s 1967 film about an interracial relationship, just missed out on a spot on this list. But there can be no excluding Get Out, Jordan Peele’s directorial debut, which tackles the same topic but with chilling, satirical horror. Netflix, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

79. The Night Of The Hunter (1955)

This hugely atmospheric thriller is about a serial killer (Robert Mitchum) who woos the widow of his old cellmate in the hope of finding buried loot

This hugely atmospheric thriller is about a serial killer (Robert Mitchum) who woos the widow of his old cellmate in the hope of finding buried loot

English actor Charles Laughton only ever directed one film, but what a film it was. This hugely atmospheric thriller is about a serial killer (Robert Mitchum) who woos the widow of his old cellmate in the hope of finding buried loot. Mitchum never gave a better performance. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon

80. Rear Window (1954)

Alfred Hitchcock’s ingenious thriller, starring James Stewart as a wheelchair-bound photographer

Alfred Hitchcock’s ingenious thriller, starring James Stewart as a wheelchair-bound photographer

Alfred Hitchcock’s ingenious thriller, starring James Stewart as a wheelchair-bound photographer who thinks he sees a neighbour committing a murder through his window, also has what is held to be the most perfect entrance by an actress – Grace Kelly leaning in for a sensual kiss. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

81. Star Wars (1977)

Star Wars characters R2D2 and C-3PO

Star Wars characters R2D2 and C-3PO

A long time ago, in a galaxy very close to home, young George Lucas had the idea that turned into Star Wars, although even he cannot have imagined what a behemoth the space opera would become. What a phenomenon. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

82. Parasite (2019)

Parasite became the first foreign-language feature to win the Oscar for Best Picture

Parasite became the first foreign-language feature to win the Oscar for Best Picture

Not for nothing did Parasite become the first foreign-language feature to win the Oscar for Best Picture. Bong Joon-ho’s film is a sparkling social satire played as farce, about a poor, working-class family in Seoul who infiltrate the life and home of a rich family. It’s amazingly well done. Netflix, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

83. All The President’s Men (1976)

Screenwriter William Goldman won his second Oscar for this political thriller

Screenwriter William Goldman won his second Oscar for this political thriller

Screenwriter William Goldman won his second Oscar for this political thriller which was based on real events of just a few years earlier, namely the Watergate scandal. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV, BFI Player

84. High Noon (1952)

Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly stared in Fred Zinnemann’s High Noon

Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly stared in Fred Zinnemann’s High Noon

There is much that sets Fred Zinnemann’s classic Western apart, not least the fact that it unfolds in 85 minutes of real time. Will Gary Cooper’s marshal (near right) leave town with his new Quaker wife (Grace Kelly), or will he stay and face down the fearsome Miller gang? Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

85. The Exorcist (1973)

Few films have created such a box office frenzy as The Exorcist (1973)

Few films have created such a box office frenzy as The Exorcist (1973)

Director William Friedkin wouldn’t have it that his terrifying film belonged to the horror genre. ‘The Exorcist was a story about the mystery of faith,’ he said. Whatever it was, few films have created such a box office frenzy. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

86. Kes (1969)

Kes is based on the Barry Hines novel A Kestrel For A Knave

Kes is based on the Barry Hines novel A Kestrel For A Knave

A wonderful story, based on the Barry Hines novel A Kestrel For A Knave, about a working-class schoolkid in a South Yorkshire mining community who is described even by his mum as a ‘hopeless case’, but who finds purpose by adopting a kestrel. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

87. Shane (1953)

Shane (1953)

Shane (1953)

The doyenne of British film critics, Dilys Powell, once wrote: ‘There is no such thing as a bad Western. There are superb Westerns, there are good Westerns, and there are Westerns.’ As an example of the superb, she cited Shane, starring Alan Ladd as a mysterious gunslinger. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

88. Chariots of Fire (1981)

Chariots of Fire (1981) tells the stories of athletes Eric Liddell and Harold Abrahams

Chariots of Fire (1981) tells the stories of athletes Eric Liddell and Harold Abrahams

 

The deft way in which this tells the stories of athletes Eric Liddell and Harold Abrahams and its tub-thumping patriotism make it one of the glories of British cinema. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

89. It Happened One Night (1934)

A glittering romantic comedy starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert and directed by the great Frank Capra

A glittering romantic comedy starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert and directed by the great Frank Capra

The first film to win the big five Oscar ‘bests’: Picture, Director, Actor, Actress and Screenplay, this is a beauty, a glittering romantic comedy starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert and directed by the great Frank Capra. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Rakuten TV

90. 12 Angry Men (1957)

12 Angry Men (1957)

12 Angry Men (1957)

A forensic study, from the jury’s perspective, of a murder trial. This absorbing film couldn’t possibly be made now – there are no women on the jury, and they’re all white. But it’s still insightful and brilliant. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

91. When We Were Kings (1996)

A riveting documentary about the 1974 Rumble In The Jungle – the world title fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman

A riveting documentary about the 1974 Rumble In The Jungle – the world title fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman

This riveting documentary about the 1974 Rumble In The Jungle – the world title fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman in Kinshasa – is about so much more than boxing. An absolute classic. Buy or rent on Amazon, Rakuten TV

92. The Vanishing (1988)

A deeply disturbing Dutch thriller about a young man searching for his missing girlfriend

A deeply disturbing Dutch thriller about a young man searching for his missing girlfriend

A well constructed, deeply disturbing Dutch thriller about a young man searching for his missing girlfriend. It was described by Stanley Kubrick as the scariest, most troubling movie he’d ever seen. ITVX Premium, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

93. The Sting (1973)

The Sting (1973)

The Sting (1973)

The swagger of George Roy Hill’s caper movie makes it one for the ages, as a pair of Depression-era con artists (Paul Newman and Robert Redford) take a Chicago mob boss to the cleaners, to the tinkling of Scott Joplin’s ragtime piano. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

94. To Kill A Mockingbird (1962)

To Kill A Mockingbird (1962) defined director Robert Mulligan's career

To Kill A Mockingbird (1962) defined director Robert Mulligan’s career 

Can you name the director of this captivating drama, which does proper justice to Harper Lee’s novel? It was Robert Mulligan – and this film defined his career. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

95. This Is Spinal Tap (1984)

This hilarious film is a mock rock documentary that paved the way for writer Chris Guest to make other joyous mockumentaries such as Best In Show and A Mighty Wind. BBC iPlayer

96. In The Heat Of The Night (1967)

Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger from In the Heat of the Night

Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger from In the Heat of the Night

In this sweaty thriller, set against the backdrop of racial tension in 1960s Mississippi, Rod Steiger and Sidney Poitier play detectives forced to work together. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon

97. Goldfinger (1964)

Goldfinger (1964)

Goldfinger (1964)

The best James Bond (Sean Connery), the best villain (Auric Goldfinger), the best henchman (Oddjob), the best car (the Aston Martin DB5), the best femme fatale (Pussy Galore) and the best theme song (by Shirley Bassey). Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

98. Raiders Of The Lost Ark (1981)

Steven Spielberg's Raiders Of The Lost Ark (1981)

Steven Spielberg’s Raiders Of The Lost Ark (1981)

Even in 1981 this film felt like a throwback, a Boys’ Own-style adventure with a dashing new hero: Indiana Jones. The director was Steven Spielberg and the producer was George Lucas, but it was made with British expertise at Elstree Studios. Disney+, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Rakuten TV

99. Thelma & Louise (1991) 

Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon in Thelma & Louise

Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon in Thelma & Louise

Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis play friends (above) whose road trip goes rogue after one of them kills a would-be rapist. Ridley Scott directed this witty drama that was also Brad Pitt’s big break. BBC iPlayer until Sunday, buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky

100. Oliver! (1968)

Oliver! starred Mark Lester and Jack Wild

Oliver! starred Mark Lester and Jack Wild

Carol Reed’s masterly adaptation of Lionel Bart’s stage musical is just one treat after another, although if you had to pick (a pocket or two), Ron Moody’s Fagin is probably the arch scene-stealer. Buy or rent on Apple, Amazon, Sky, Rakuten TV

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk