Ten ways YOU can help make No Deal Brexit a success for Britain


Ten ways YOU can help make No Deal Brexit a success for Britain

1 The road to recovery

Buying cars made in the UK will avoid any import taxes, and help support a vital industry which employs 180,000 workers.

2 Have a little lamb

Your Sunday roast is about to become a lot cheaper if you buy lamb, as a surplus of quality British meat will likely flood the market. We produce more lamb than we consume, but punitive EU tariffs mean that farmers will face export taxes of up to 40 per cent.

3 Escape to the country

Holidaying in the UK next year is likely to be cheaper and less hassle than going abroad (you may need extra insurance and driving documents in the EU). Plus you’ll be helping a homegrown travel industry battered by the pandemic.

A Jaguar F-Type V8S convertible 

A hazy end to a beautiful spring day looking towards the Cotswold town of Stroud from Swifts Hill, Slad, Gloucestershire

A hazy end to a beautiful spring day looking towards the Cotswold town of Stroud from Swifts Hill, Slad, Gloucestershire

Your Sunday roast is about to become a lot cheaper if you buy lamb, as a surplus of quality British meat will likely flood the market (file image)

Your Sunday roast is about to become a lot cheaper if you buy lamb, as a surplus of quality British meat will likely flood the market (file image)

4 Suck it up!

With no ‘level playing field’ agreement, Britain will be able to ditch EU rules, such as the one that limits the power of vacuum cleaners to 900-watts. So if the UK repeals such red tape, you’ll be able send a message to Brussels about their regulations by buying a model up to the old 1,600-watt limit.

5 Buy, er… Japanese

If Brussels intransigence leaves us without a UK-EU trade deal, we can reward those countries that DO want to do business with us. Our new trade deal with Japan will make goods such as bluefin tuna, Kobe beef and udon noodles cheaper here, while 99 per cent of UK exports will benefit from tariff-free trade, too. We also have a favourable trade deal with Canada.

By eating more mussels (file image), mackerel, sardines and pollock, UK consumers could provide a massive boost to the nation's fishing industry which employs 12,000 people

By eating more mussels (file image), mackerel, sardines and pollock, UK consumers could provide a massive boost to the nation’s fishing industry which employs 12,000 people

6 Flex your mussels

Dozens of fish species live in UK waters, but unadventurous diners tend to eat just salmon, tuna and cod – most of which is imported from abroad. By eating more mussels, mackerel, sardines and pollock, UK consumers could provide a massive boost to the nation’s fishing industry which employs 12,000 people. A No Deal Brexit could allow British boats to catch more fish in UK waters, too, leading to cheaper prices.

7 Buy a second home

That might be economically impossible for many, but it’s a good time to invest in UK property as record low interest rates are likely to continue because of the economic uncertainty caused by Brexit. The market is currently booming, but you have to be prepared to weather its ups and downs, as house prices are expected to fall next year before staging a recovery later in 2022.

No Deal tariffs could hike the price of French cheese by 40 per cent, but that's the perfect opportunity to try British alternatives, such as Somerset brie (file image)

No Deal tariffs could hike the price of French cheese by 40 per cent, but that’s the perfect opportunity to try British alternatives, such as Somerset brie (file image)

8 Don’t worry, brie happy

No Deal tariffs could hike the price of French cheese by 40 per cent, but that’s the perfect opportunity to try British alternatives, such as Somerset brie and camembert, Baron Bigod cheese from Suffolk, Stinking Bishop from Gloucestershire or good old cheddar or stilton.

9 Raise a glass to Britain

English wines have a fast-growing reputation, picking up awards in record numbers thanks to producers such as Roebuck Estates in West Sussex and Simpsons in Kent. Foreign alcohol could face import tariffs of 18 per cent, making UK booze even more appealing.

English wine new in bottle with shop decorated represent domestic products of England and alcohol retail business on October 24, 2015 in Petworth West Sussex

English wine new in bottle with shop decorated represent domestic products of England and alcohol retail business on October 24, 2015 in Petworth West Sussex

10 Rags to riches

British-made fashion could undergo a renaissance in the event of No Deal, which could mean the prices of EU imports rising 12 per cent thanks to tariffs. Buying British would also cut carbon emissions from transport, already cited as a big concern among customers. 

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