Sunday Scrum: Detained Canadians granted consular access


CBC News Network’s Sunday Scrum panel is your destination for frank discussion and analysis of the week’s big political stories.

This week, we talk to our panellists about how Canada’s ambassador to China, Dominic Barton, was recently granted virtual consular access to detained Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. 

The panellists also discuss new, targeted aid for some businesses hit by COVID-19 closures as Ontario brings back certain pandemic restrictions intended to halt the spread of the virus.

Also on the program: a discussion of the wealth gap exposed by the public health crisis, the federal government’s return to a controversial lottery system that distributes sponsorships to reunite immigrant families and what the result of the U.S. presidential election could mean for Canadians. 

WATCH | Spavor, Kovrig granted consular access:

Canada’s ambassador to China was granted virtual consular access to Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, the first time a Canadian official has been in touch with the two detained Canadians since China formally charged them with spying in June. 8:06

WATCH | More aid for businesses hit by COVID closures:

The federal government announced targeted aid this week for some businesses hit by COVID-19 closures as Ontario and Quebec report record-breaking daily numbers, prompting restrictions on indoor dining, bars and cinemas.  7:22

WATCH | Closing the wealth gap:

Experts are warning that the wealthy and the less well-off are economically recovering from COVID-19 at dramatically different rates, leading many governments — including the federal Liberals — to consider higher taxes for the wealthy. 5:16

WATCH | Immigration lottery opens Oct. 13:

The federal government announced this week it is returning to a controversial lottery system to distribute coveted sponsorships to reunite immigrant families. 6:58

WATCH | Bracing for disruptions from U.S. election:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said this week his government is bracing for potential ‘disruptions’ if the U.S. election results are not clear. With the result in question, what would that mean for us here at home? 9:42

Read more at CBC.ca