Sophie Wessex says she hopes daughter Lady Louise will be able to be ‘as private as she wants to be’


Sophie Wessex has said she hopes her daughter Lady Louise Windsor will be able to lead a ‘private life’ for the ‘next few years’. 

The Countess of Wessex, 56, spoke about the 17-year-old in a wide-ranging interview with the BBC’s Naga Munchetty at St James’s Palace.

Speaking on BBC Radio 5 Live on how the media affects her family, Sophie said her daughter ‘doesn’t really get involved with social media’ and ‘isn’t interested in putting anything out about herself’. 

The mother-of-two Sophie added that while Lady Louise has her eyes ‘fairly wide open’, there will inevitably be moments in her future ‘that may not go so well’ – and she hopes her daughter will have friends to ‘protect her’.  

Sophie Wessex, pictured ahead of  a wide-ranging interview with the BBC’s Naga Munchetty at St James’s Palace,  said she hopes her daughter Lady Louise Windsor will be able to lead a ‘private life’ for the ‘next few years’

Sophie said her daughter 'doesn't really get involved with social media'. The mother and daughter are pictured walking out of Windsor Castle in April

Sophie said her daughter ‘doesn’t really get involved with social media’. The mother and daughter are pictured walking out of Windsor Castle in April 

‘We are protective, obviously,’ said the Countess. ‘She doesn’t really get involved with social media very much at all and that is purely her choice. I wouldn’t deny her going onto it, but she’s not really that interested in it. 

‘There’s a few platforms that she talks to her friends on but that’s basically it, she doesn’t put anything out about herself at all. She’s very private.  

‘She has her eyes fairly wide open, but inevitably there will be moments that may not go so well for her, I just hope we can be there to support her through those moments.

‘I hope that she and her friends will protect her from anything that somebody might want to do. But I have to let her live her life. It’s not mine to live.

Lady Louise, pictured in 2019, is an accomplished carriage driver, having followed the Duke of Edinburgh into the sport

Lady Louise, pictured in 2019, is an accomplished carriage driver, having followed the Duke of Edinburgh into the sport

‘I can only equip her the best that I can, and then she has to make her own choices. But I hope for the next few years, at least, she will still be able to be as private as she wants to be.’ 

Overall, the Countess believes she and her family have a ‘pretty good private life’, acknowledging attention in pubic is a prerequisite of royal status. 

‘We have got a lot of really close friends who we know and trust, we don’t broadcast what we’re doing,’ she said. 

‘There are moments we are doing what can be described as semi-private things, but you’re in a public space and I think in those circumstances you sort of have to accept that there will be a certain amount of attention. 

‘If you are somewhere there will be cameras then you have to accept it. It is what it is.’  

Overall, the Countess believes she and her family have a 'pretty good private life', acknowledging attention in pubic is a prerequisite of her royal status. She is pictured with her family at the Great British Beach Clean in Southsea last year

Overall, the Countess believes she and her family have a ‘pretty good private life’, acknowledging attention in pubic is a prerequisite of her royal status. She is pictured with her family at the Great British Beach Clean in Southsea last year 

The Countess of Wessex, who also shares 13-year-old son James, Viscount Severn, with husband Prince Edward, also spoke of the special bond Lady Louise shared with her grandfather Prince Philip, who died in April aged 99.

Lady Louise is an accomplished carriage driver, having followed the Duke of Edinburgh into the sport and her mother says she gained a ‘great passion’ and a ‘natural curiosity’ from her grandfather. 

The Countess said: ‘He was so pleased when she took the sport up because I took it up… I was okay. Well, I was really at the beginning of my carriage driving career and then I fell pregnant with Louise, so I had to sort of hang up the reins, so I was really delighted when I found out she wanted to have a go. 

‘My father-in-law was always so good at encouraging, he was really encouraging of Louise. So when she not only said “please can I have a go”, but then when she showed a flair for it, he was just brilliant with her. 

Sophie and her children were among the 30 guests at Prince Philip's funeral in April, but the mother-of-two said that the pandemic hasn't allowed the family to properly grieve the death of the beloved duke

Sophie and her children were among the 30 guests at Prince Philip’s funeral in April, but the mother-of-two said that the pandemic hasn’t allowed the family to properly grieve the death of the beloved duke

‘They used to chat away about it and he would always turn up if she was competing in the Great Park, he would always turn up to watch her and watch her training days.’ 

Sophie and her children were among the 30 guests at Prince Philip’s funeral in April, but the mother said that the pandemic hasn’t allowed the family to properly grieve the death of the beloved duke.

‘It’s hard to spend as much time with the Queen as we would like to, as we’ve been trying to, but of course it’s still not that easy,’ she said. 

‘And of course the normal way of things isn’t normal yet, so we’re not necessarily doing the things we would normally have done with him, so I think the whole grieving process is likely to take a lot longer.’

Sophie recalled taking a photograph of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh smiling together at the top of the Coyles of Muick near Balmoral in 2003

Sophie recalled taking a photograph of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh smiling together at the top of the Coyles of Muick near Balmoral in 2003 

The Countess said the restrictions mean, unless you are under the same roof as your loved one, the ‘immediate loss isn’t necessarily felt in the same way as if someone was in the house with you all the time’. 

‘So if they were normally at a slight distance or living down the road, whether it be 15 minutes or 1,500 miles, it’s only when you would do the normal things you would have done and you suddenly realise they’re not there, you start to have an “Oh my goodness” moment.’ 

One such moment, for Sophie, was a holiday to Scotland with her family over the May half term – when they visited the site she took a photograph of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh smiling together at the top of the Coyles of Muick near Balmoral in 2003.

‘Just to be there, in that place, was an “Oh my goodness” moment’, said the Countess. ‘So I think they’ll come and go. You have to let them come and let them go.’ 

This week Sophie has attended Royal Ascot with Prince Edward, leading the royal glamour with her stylish outfits. 

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