Rosie Jones shares her rousing speech on abolishing ableism as she continues attack on vile trolls… after Big Fat Quiz Of The Year viewers branded her ‘unsuitable’ for comedy

Rosie Jones continued to hit back at critics following the upsetting reaction to her appearance on The Big Fat Quiz Of The Year on Tuesday. 

Taking to Twitter on Friday, the star, 33, who has cerebral palsy, responded to vile comments from viewers of the Boxing Day show, who alleged they ‘could not understand her’ and insisted she was ‘unsuitable for comedy’.

Having vowed to ‘lay low’ in the wake of the cruelty, Rosie took to social media to repost a clip from her appearance on The One Show in February.  

While appearing on the BBC show earlier this year, she spoke about her documentary about online hate and how she is impacted by trolls, while also detailing the concerns over the lack of understanding surrounding ableism. 

On the couch, she spoke to Alex Jones and Boyzone’s Ronan Keating, saying: ‘As a disabled person in the media, I get a lot of online abuse every single day and I really wanted to explore that and get to the bottom of why people are ableist.’

Rosie Jones continued to hit back at critics following the upsetting reaction to her appearance on The Big Fat Quiz Of The Year on Tuesday

Taking to Twitter on Friday, the star, 33, who has cerebral palsy, responded to vile comments from viewers of the Boxing Day show, who alleged they 'could not understand her' and insisted she was 'unsuitable for comedy'

Taking to Twitter on Friday, the star, 33, who has cerebral palsy, responded to vile comments from viewers of the Boxing Day show, who alleged they ‘could not understand her’ and insisted she was ‘unsuitable for comedy’ 

Having vowed to 'lay low' in the wake of the cruelty, Rosie took to social media to repost a clip from her appearance on The One Show in February

Having vowed to ‘lay low’ in the wake of the cruelty, Rosie took to social media to repost a clip from her appearance on The One Show in February

She spoke about the lack of understanding of ableism, which is listed in the dictionary as ‘the discrimination of and social prejudice against people with disabilities based on the belief that typical abilities are superior.

Rosie said: ‘Not a lot of people know what ableism is and it is simply when you discriminate against somebody because of their disability…

‘I feel like if you go in the street and you say to somebody what is racism? What is sexism? What is homophobia? People know exactly what it is…

‘But when you say what is ableism people stumble over their words. That’s quite damaging because if you don’t know what ableism is how can we ever stop it?’ 

Rosie appeared on the panel of Big Fat Quiz Of The Year alongside the likes of Katherine Ryan, Mo Gilligan, Richard Ayoade and Mel Giedroyc.

She was met with the onslaught of cruel comments from trolls, many of whom insisted she was present for ‘box ticking’.

In response to the pile-on, the star took to Twitter to hit out at the ableism, writing: ‘Rinse and repeat. Different telly show, same old ableism. Thanks for the support, but I’m gonna lie low for a bit and sink into the perineum of Christmas and New Year.’

She shared the message alongside her tweet from December 18, which was a response to criticism of her Royal Variety Performance, before she was met with support from Dawn French, Joe Lycett and good pal Nish Kumar.

She spoke about the lack of understanding of ableism, which is listed in the dictionary as 'the discrimination of and social prejudice against people with disabilities based on the belief that typical abilities are superior

She spoke about the lack of understanding of ableism, which is listed in the dictionary as ‘the discrimination of and social prejudice against people with disabilities based on the belief that typical abilities are superior

Rosie - who has cerebral palsy - was cruelly trolled after the episode aired on Boxing Day and she took to social media to hit out at the 'ableist' comments

Rosie – who has cerebral palsy – was cruelly trolled after the episode aired on Boxing Day and she took to social media to hit out at the ‘ableist’ comments

A slew of viewers flooded Twitter to share their opinions on her appearance, with users writing: ‘I don’t find Rosie Jones funny I love laughing at disabled people… I didn’t watch TBFQ because of Rosie Jones and Katherine Ryan. They are not funny…’

‘Never watched Rosie Jones on TV but I’ve heard her on the radio. Other comedians I can listen to in the background whilst chopping onions etc but with Rosie Jones I have to stop and concentrate otherwise it’s just noise. Is that ableist?…’ 

‘As Rosie Jones is such a comedic titan. She can put all this ‘is she funny’ heresy to bed by simply responding to her critics. However, I imagine like her stand up, her punchline will be a little off and sluggish, and it definitely won’t be worth the wait…’

‘I’d have no problem with a blind or wheelchair using comedian. But communication is the critical skill for TV work, and Rosie Jones’ disability makes her unsuitable. She’s not doing it for free; the paying customer has the right to set the expectation…’

‘Shouldn’t have to point this out but a large part of comedy is based on timing . The delay with Rosie Jones as you work out the response she will give is just beyond painful… This post is way funnier than anything Rosie Jones has ever said…’

‘The only time she is funny is when she dribbles down herself. She ruins every show she is wheeled out on. Just a tick box [exercise].’

Fans were quick to share their support with the star as one wrote: ‘You were fab on both shows!!… I thought you were brilliant. Keep going… Sorry to hear this Rosie – keep your spirits up although I know it’s hard to do so – wishing you all the best.’

Nish, who frequently appears alongside Rosie on TV, took to the microblogging site to pen: ‘Rosie Jones is the best’, while Dawn wrote on her original tweet about the Royal Variety Performance: ‘You are totally my cup of tea’.

Following the backlash against Rosie, Joe Lycett posted a picture of them together at Stand Up To Cancer, where he walked along with his arm around the comedian. 

The comedian, 33, appeared on the panel of the annual Channel 4 game show alongside the likes of Katherine Ryan (pictured), Mo Gilligan, Richard Ayoade and Mel Giedroyc

The comedian, 33, appeared on the panel of the annual Channel 4 game show alongside the likes of Katherine Ryan (pictured), Mo Gilligan, Richard Ayoade and Mel Giedroyc 

A slew of viewers flooded Twitter to share their opinions on her appearance, with users writing: 'I don't find Rosie Jones funny I love laughing at disabled people... I didn't watch TBFQ because of Rosie Jones and Katherine Ryan. They are not funny'

A slew of viewers flooded Twitter to share their opinions on her appearance, with users writing: ‘I don’t find Rosie Jones funny I love laughing at disabled people… I didn’t watch TBFQ because of Rosie Jones and Katherine Ryan. They are not funny’

The comments section of her post was flooded with kind messages from her 139,000 followers as they shared their support

The comments section of her post was flooded with kind messages from her 139,000 followers as they shared their support

It is not the first time Rosie has spoken about being trolled as she hit out at cruel comments following her stand-up comedy gig at the Royal Variety Performance. 

She was part of the star-studded line-up alongside the likes of Hannah Waddingham and Bradley Walsh, but was on the receiving end of trolling over her performance.

However, Rosie took to social media to hit back at the criticism as she accused the trolls of ‘ableism’ and insisted that she doesn’t want to hear what they have to say.

She wrote: ‘Thank you for all of the lovely messages about The Royal Variety last night, what fun. Less of a thanks to the not so lovely ones. 

‘Comedy is subjective and it’s ok if I’m not your cup of tea. But please remember the difference between personal preference and downright ableism.’

She also took to Instagram to share an impassioned video where she once again hit back at the cruel trolling and vowed that it is not going to stop her in her career.

‘So I was on the Royal Variety last night I just want to make something clear, if you want to write to me to tell me that I’m not funny, don’t, because I don’t care,’ she said.

‘If you want to say that I’m too disabled to be on telly or you can’t understand me, don’t bother, because again, I don’t care and I’m going to carry on being on your screen with my big disabled voice.’

The comments section of her post was flooded with kind messages from her 139,000 followers as they shared their support.

One wrote: ‘You are funny, and strong, and a legend! And I bet you’re a hell of a lot funnier and better company than whoever sends those negative nasty comments…

‘Spot on Rosie, if people don’t like you or find you funny, that’s their problem, you’re lovely and hysterical… National Treasure and People’s Princess @josierones you are FABULOUS and we love you…

‘You’re hilarious and seriously talented. Thank you for all you do for the disabled community as a side effect of what you do.’

Other fans also shared their excitement for her upcoming six-episode sitcom, which she is writing and starring in for Channel 4. 

Nish Kumar and Dawn French were among stars throwing their support behind Rosie

Dawn showed her support

Nish Kumar and Dawn French were among stars throwing their support behind Rosie 

The comedians rallied to support Rosie after she was subjected to abuse

The comedians rallied to support Rosie after she was subjected to abuse 

Following the backlash against Rosie, Joe Lycett posted a picture of them together at Stand Up To Cancer

Following the backlash against Rosie, Joe Lycett posted a picture of them together at Stand Up To Cancer

It is not the first time Rosie has spoken about being trolled as she hit out at cruel comments following her stand-up comedy gig at the Royal Variety Performance

It is not the first time Rosie has spoken about being trolled as she hit out at cruel comments following her stand-up comedy gig at the Royal Variety Performance 

At the time, Rosie took to social media to hit back at the criticism as she accused the trolls of 'ableism' and insisted that she doesn't want to hear what they have to say

At the time, Rosie took to social media to hit back at the criticism as she accused the trolls of ‘ableism’ and insisted that she doesn’t want to hear what they have to say

Disability Benefits will see Rosie star as Emily, who starts her own illegal drugs empire after her state benefits are cut when she is made redundant. 

Rosie said of the project: ‘I am incredibly excited to be making Disability Benefits for Channel 4. It has always been my dream to have my own sitcom and now it is coming true! Bring it on!!’

Earlier this year, Rosie also released a documentary called Am I a R*tard? and defended its controversial title as she discussed the abuse she has received.

The documentary aimed to explore and educate viewers on the online abuse faced by those with disabilities, including Rosie.

However it then emerged that a number of disabled contributors were withdrawing from the documentary fronted by Rosie as they claimed its title was ‘damaging’. 

But Rosie defended her use of the title and said although the word was ‘abhorrent’, she ‘wanted to tackle the subject head on’.

Appearing on This Morning, Rosie said: ‘I needed to stay true to my lived experience which is I get that word thrown at me online and in the street on a regular basis.’

She explained: ‘Every single day, I receive ableist comments online, ableism in the street and no one knows about that.

‘Therefore no one, I felt, was taking that seriously, so I really felt passionate about getting my truth out there because if we start the conversation about albeism and slurs, then we can start to start really stop it.’

She said she feels ‘attacked’ from different avenues, saying: ‘It really needs to stop.’

Earlier this year, Rosie also released a documentary called Am I a R*tard? and defended its controversial title as she discussed the abuse she has received

Earlier this year, Rosie also released a documentary called Am I a R*tard? and defended its controversial title as she discussed the abuse she has received

Host Dermot O’Leary went on to question Rosie about the title, with the star saying: ‘Well I understand that a lot of people have found the title to be very upsetting. And I get why. 

‘I find that word absolutely abhorrent. And when I get criticised from my own community it hits harder but this is my documentary.

‘I really feel that people use that slur and other ableist slurs casually in schools, in pubs, online, on the street, without really ever considering how damaging it is.

Who is Rosie Jones?  

Comedian Rosie Jones hit back at ‘ableist’ trolls following her Boxing Day appearance on Channel 4’s Big Fat Quiz Of The Year.

She was branded ‘unsuitable’ for the show after appearing alongside the likes of Katherine Ryan, Mo Gilligan, Richard Ayoade and Mel Giedroyc.

Many comments online alleged that Ms Jones was on the programme for ‘box ticking’, while others claimed they ‘could not understand her’.

In response to the pile-on, the star took to Twitter to hit out at the ableism, writing: ‘Rinse and repeat. Different telly show, same old ableism. Thanks for the support, but I’m gonna lie low for a bit and sink into the perineum of Christmas and New Year.’ 

So, who is the comedian at the centre of it all? Find out more about Rosie Jones and the ableism row surrounding her by reading on. 

She is a comedian, writer and actress who uses her cerebral palsy to enhance punchlines and says she can make jokes that other, able-bodied, comedians could not

She is a comedian, writer and actress who uses her cerebral palsy to enhance punchlines and says she can make jokes that other, able-bodied, comedians could not

Who is Rosie Jones? 

Rosie Jones is an British comedian, actress and writer from Bridlington, Yorkshire, and born on June 24, 1990.

She has ataxic cerebral palsy – meaning that the condition effects her speech, movement and balance.

Age four, Rosie stood up in front of her new primary school classmates and said: ‘Hi, I’m Rosie. I have cerebral palsy, which means I talk slowly and I fall over a lot. But apart from that I am just like you.’ 

The condition has influenced Ms Jones’ comedic style, using her slowed speech as a tool to emphasise punchlines and surprise audiences.

She says that she is able to make jokes that able-bodied colleagues could not when referencing her cerebral palsy.

A few years after graduating from the University of Huddersfield, she took a screenwriting class at the National Film and Television School.

A year later, in 2016, she reached the final of the Funny Women Awards. 

The comedian went on to write for 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown, Would I Lie To You? and Sex Education, but she made her name on-screen.

Ms Jones’ TV appearances began in 2019 on comedy panel shows like Hypothetical, 8 Out Of 10 Cats and The Last Leg – for which she attended the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics as a reporter.

She hit the headlines in 2023, before the Big Fat Quiz Of The Year appearance, for the controversial name of her documentary: Am I A R*tard.

At the beginning of the documentary, Rosie addressed the controversy surrounding the title and why she wanted it to be kept in.

The comedian said: ‘This programme has a very shocking word in it. The “R” word.

‘I understand that it will be upsetting to many but I believe we need to confront this word and other ableist terms head-on for people to realise how damaging it is.

‘So I said to Channel 4, “let’s use that word in the title and then hopefully, by the end of this film, people will think twice before ever using that word again.”‘

The rest of the programme followed Ms Jones as she ‘explores how prevalent disability trolling is in the UK, and why it’s often left unchecked’. 

The comedian also hit headlines in 2023 for the controversial title of her documentary: Am I A R*tard

The comedian also hit headlines in 2023 for the controversial title of her documentary: Am I A R*tard

Why was the comedian targeted after Big Fat Quiz Of The Year appearance?

The comedian experienced ‘ableist’ trolling after her Boxing Day appearance 0on 2023’s edition of the Big Fat Quiz Of The Year on Channel 4.

Following the episode, Rosie was met with an onslaught of cruel comments, many of which insisted she was present for ‘box ticking’, while others alleged they ‘could not understand her’.

A slew of viewers flooded Twitter, with users writing: ‘I don’t find Rosie Jones funny I love laughing at disabled people… 

‘I didn’t watch TBFQ because of Rosie Jones and Katherine Ryan. They are not funny…

‘Never watched Rosie Jones on TV but I’ve heard her on the radio. Other comedians I can listen to in the background whilst chopping onions etc but with Rosie Jones I have to stop and concentrate otherwise it’s just noise. Is that ableist?…

‘As Rosie Jones is such a comedic titan. She can put all this ‘is she funny’ heresy to bed by simply responding to her critics. However, I imagine like her stand up, her punchline will be a little off and sluggish, and it definitely won’t be worth the wait…

‘I’d have no problem with a blind or wheelchair using comedian. But communication is the critical skill for TV work, and Rosie Jones’ disability makes her unsuitable. She’s not doing it for free; the paying customer has the right to set the expectation…

‘Shouldn’t have to point this out but a large part of comedy is based on timing . The delay with Rosie Jones as you work out the response she will give is just beyond painful… This post is way funnier than anything Rosie Jones has ever said…

‘The only time she is funny is when she dribbles down herself. She ruins every show she is wheeled out on. Just a tick box [exercise].’

Ms Jones had just recently responded to similar abuse after appearing at the Royal Variety Performance, alongside the likes of Hannah Waddingham and Bradley Walsh.

What has Rosie Jones said in response?

In response to the pile-on, the star took to X, formerly Twitter, to hit out at the ableism, writing: ‘Rinse and repeat. Different telly show, same old ableism. Thanks for the support, but I’m gonna lie low for a bit and sink into the perineum of Christmas and New Year.’

She shared the message while reposting her tweet from December 18, which was a response to criticism of her aforementioned Royal Variety Performance.

That first post was met with support from fellow comedians Dawn French and Nish Kumar.

It read: ‘Thank you for all of the lovely messages about The Royal Variety last night, what fun. Less of a thanks to the not so lovely ones. 

‘Comedy is subjective and it’s ok if I’m not your cup of tea. But please remember the difference between personal preference and downright ableism.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk