Retired science teacher fails to answer ‘easy’ chemistry question on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?


Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? viewers are left in shock as retired science teacher fails to answer ‘easy’ £4,000 chemistry question despite using a lifeline (but would YOU get it right?)

  • Pat Lucas, from Lincoln, a retired science teacher, was asked chemistry question
  • For £4, 0000, she was asked to identify a skull and crossbones warning symbol
  • Viewers were left in shock when she got question wrong – despite using a lifeline 
  • She appeared on last night’s episode of ITV’s Who Wants to Be a Millionaire

Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? viewers were left in ‘shock’ after a retired science teacher failed to identify a toxic chemical symbol.

In last night’s episode of the ITV quiz show, Pat Lucas, from Lincoln, was asked by host Jeremy Clarkson: ‘A skull and crossbones is a warning symbol that specifically indicates a material is what?’

However, viewers were quick to take to Twitter to express their outrage after the retired science teacher got the ‘easy’ chemistry question wrong and left the show with £1, 000 – despite using a 50/50 lifeline,  

‘Can’t believe that science teacher got that question wrong, shocking. Such an easy question,’ wrote one, while a second penned: ‘How the hell does a science teacher get that wrong!’

In last night’s episode of the ITV quiz show, retired science teacher Pat Lucas (pictured), from Lincoln, failed to identify a toxic chemical symbol

Viewers were quick to take to Twitter to express their outrage after the retired science teacher got the 'easy' chemistry question wrong (pictured)

Viewers were quick to take to Twitter to express their outrage after the retired science teacher got the ‘easy’ chemistry question wrong (pictured)

In response to the £4, 000 question, Pat was presented the following options: A) Toxic, B) Corrosive, C) Hazardous to the environment, and D) Flammable.

‘Okay… Being a science teacher I see a lot of this symbol, you’d think I would have paid more attention to it,’ she said, before asking: ‘Erm, can i use my 50:50 please?’

Following the lifeline, Pat was left with just A and C, and admitted: ‘I wish one of the others was gone, I am sure it means hazardous to the environment.

‘So I will go for hazardous to the environment, final answer.’

In response to the £4, 000 question, Pat was presented the following options: A) Toxic, B) Corrosive, C) Hazardous to the environment, and D) Flammable (pictured)

In response to the £4, 000 question, Pat was presented the following options: A) Toxic, B) Corrosive, C) Hazardous to the environment, and D) Flammable (pictured)

Taking to Twitter, one person penned: 'The kids at school will be giving her plenty of stick' (pictured)

Taking to Twitter, one person penned: ‘The kids at school will be giving her plenty of stick’ (pictured)

Breaking the bad news the retired science teacher, Jeremy said: ‘Well you are a science teacher, so you could have got that right… But I’m afraid you didn’t.

‘You’ve just lost £1,000, I’m sorry about that I really am, I hope you had a nice minute or two in the chair.’

And those who tuned in were baffled that Pat answered incorrectly. 

‘Can’t get over that retired science teacher not knowing what the toxic symbol was,’ wrote one, while a second penned: ‘No wonder no kids are interested in science if the science teacher does not know what the toxic symbol is. Despised that subject yet even I knew that WITHOUT the options.’

A third added: A “science teacher”….obviously skipped the health and safety training,’ while a fourth commented: ‘Science teacher who doesn’t know the ‘Toxic’ warning symbol even on 50:50 The kids at school will be giving her plenty of stick.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk