Quorn ad is rapped for eco claims


Quorn ad is rapped for eco claims: Meat replacement company’s boast that its rice pot helps cut consumer’s carbon footprint is ruled misleading by watchdog

  • The advert claimed the Quorn rice pot helps cut consumer’s carbon footprint
  • Quorn, which makes meat replacement products, put out the TV advert in April 
  • Advertising Standards Authority said it was not clear what food the pot was being measured against 

An advert claiming a Quorn rice pot helps cut the consumer’s carbon footprint has been ruled misleading.

After 32 viewers challenged the claims, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) said Quorn’s owner Marlow Foods did not make clear what food the pot was being measured against.

Quorn, which makes meat replacement products, put out the TV advert in April. It sees a woman eating Quorn’s Thai Style Wonder Grains. 

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) said the advert claiming a Quorn rice pot helped cut a consumer’s carbon footprint was likely to mislead customers. (Stock image)

She says ‘I care about climate change’ and the pot is a ‘step in the right direction’ because it helps her reduce her carbon footprint.

Marlow Foods said the rice pot was certified by the Carbon Trust, which helps businesses to become more sustainable.

The food firm also said it had signed up to a carbon protocol, with a commitment to continue cutting the product’s emissions.

The meat replacement company, which is owned by Marlow Foods, put out the TV advert in April. (Stock image)

The meat replacement company, which is owned by Marlow Foods, put out the TV advert in April. (Stock image)

It added that Quorn Pieces, a key ingredient, had a lower carbon footprint than chicken.

However, because the advert did not make clear the basis of the firm’s claims, the ASA concluded its message was likely to mislead consumers.

In its ruling, the watchdog told Marlow Foods to ensure its environmental claims were made clear and did not ‘mislead by omitting material information from their ads’. 

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