Queensland in 22,069 Covid cases as Dr John Gerrard reveals surprise unvaccinated figure


Queensland reports 22,069 cases of Covid as straight-talking top doctor reveals unvaccinated people are NINE times more likely to end up in hospital

  • Queensland has recorded 22,069 Covid cases, up from 20,566 on Tuesday 
  • There are now 130,947 active cases in the state and 525 patients in hospital
  • Chief Health Officer Dr John Gerrard said data shows trends in hospitalisation 
  • He said unvaccinated were nine times more likely to need medical treatment  


Queensland has recorded 22,069 cases of Covid as the state’s top doctor reveals unvaccinated people are nine times more likely to be hospitalised with the virus.  

There are now 130,947 active cases in the state and 525 Covid patients in Queensland hospitals, including 30 in ICU.

Chief Health Officer Dr John Gerrard said there was enough data to see trends on the types of patients who requirement medical treatment.

‘If you are unvaccinated, you are nine times more likely to end up in hospital than if you have received a boosted vaccination … that is three doses of vaccine,’ he said. 

Chief Health Officer Dr John Gerrard (pictured) has warned the unvaccinated are nine times more likely to be hospitalised with Covid-19

At least 88.02 per cent of eligible Queenslanders are fully vaccinated, and 91.23 per cent have had at least one dose. 

Health Minister Yvette D’Ath  said the hospitalisation rate reflected the state’s vaccination rate.

‘I want to thank everyone who continues to come out and get vaccinated because we know this has helped slow down the number of people coming into our hospital system and needing ICU,’ she said.

Of the new cases, 3985 were detected from rapid antigen test results registered online, while 57, 604 tests were collected through clinics over the past 24 hours. 

Ms D’Ath said there were no plans to penalise or fine people for failing to report positive RAT results like NSW is proposing.

‘The question for NSW is how are they going to actually monitor that?’ she said.

‘How do you know someone’s got a positive test in a home kit, at home, and haven’t reported?

‘You know, are you going to start asking people in the household to start dobbing them in? I just don’t know how they’re going to monitor it.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk