Prince Andrew is served notice of sexual assault suit brought by Virginia Giuffre 


EXCLUSIVE: Prince Andrew is served with paperwork at his home in Britain for the bombshell sexual assault lawsuit from Jeffrey Epstein accuser who says she was forced to have sex with him as a teen

  • A document filed Friday shows an affidavit of service was served at the Duke of York’s home in Windsor, England on August 27
  • An agent working on behalf of Virginia Roberts handed them over to police officers at the property  
  • Roberts claims she was forced to have sex with Andrew when she was 17
  • Andrew has denied the allegations and has not been charged  

Prince Andrew has been served at his home in Britain with the paperwork for the bombshell lawsuit from his accuser who sued him in a US court.  

According to a document filed on Friday, an affidavit of service was served at the Duke of York’s home in Windsor, England on August 27.

An agent working on behalf of Virginia Roberts, who claims she was forced to have sex with Andrew when she was 17, handed them over to police officers at the property.

The agent had tried the day before but was rebuffed and told that staff had been ‘primed’ not to accept any documents, the court papers state.

When the agent returned the next day, the police officers at the gate of Royal Lodge, Andrew’s official residence, changed their mind and allowed him to leave the paperwork.

Prince Andrew, Virginia Roberts, aged 17, and Ghislaine Maxwell at Ghislaine Maxwell’s townhouse in London, Britain, in 2001. Prince Andrew was served at his home in Britain with paperwork for the bombshell sexual assault lawsuit

Virginia Roberts (pictured) claims she was forced to have sex with Andrew when she was 17

Prince Andrew (pictured in April) has denied the allegations and has not been charged

Virginia Roberts (left) claims she was forced to have sex with Andrew when she was 17. Prince Andrew (right in April) has denied the allegations and has not been charged

Service of the papers starts the clock ticking for Andrew to respond or face a default judgement.

Normally defendants have 21 days to respond but a judge may extend that given that the Duke is not in the US.

The development comes ahead of the first hearing in the case which is set for Monday when Andrew’s lawyers could identify themselves for the first time.   

Roberts, an alleged victim of convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, filed a lawsuit against Andrew in federal court in Manhattan, New York, August 9. 

She claims the prince sexually assaulted her at Epstein’s mansion when she was 17 – below the age of consent in the US. 

According to a document filed on Friday (above), an affidavit of service was served at the Duke of York's home in Windsor, England on August 27

According to a document filed on Friday (above), an affidavit of service was served at the Duke of York’s home in Windsor, England on August 27

In the suit, she claims Andrew knew ‘she was a sex-trafficking victim’. 

Andrew has long denied the allegations and has not been charged with a crime.

In a car-crash TV interview with BBC News in 2019 he claimed he had no knowledge of ever meeting Roberts. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk