‘Password’ still among the most popular passwords in the UK


When it comes to setting our passwords, it appears many of us still don’t take security that seriously.

That’s because new research reveals that phrases including ‘123456’, ‘qwerty’ and ‘password’ are still among the most popular around the world.

In the UK, ‘password’ has overtaken ‘123456’ as the most used password this year, according to NordPass.

The password management company has released its annual Most Common Passwords report, finding passwords vary greatly in different countries and between different genders.

People are still using the same easy to crack passwords, according to a new study, with the most popular ‘123456’, ‘qwerty’ and ‘password’

Men in Britain are more likely to have the likes of 'liverpool', 'arsenal' and 'chelsea' as their passwords, in reference to their favourite football team. This table shows the most popular sports team passwords worldwide

Men in Britain are more likely to have the likes of ‘liverpool’, ‘arsenal’ and ‘chelsea’ as their passwords, in reference to their favourite football team. This table shows the most popular sports team passwords worldwide

THE MOST COMMON PASSWORDS IN THE UK

1. password

2. 123456

3. guest

4. liverpool

5. qwerty

6. arsenal

7. 123456789

8. password1

9. 12345

10. 12345678

11. chelsea

12. charlie

13. abc123

14. liverpool1

15. Parola12

16. football

17. monkey

18. chocolate

19. yuantuo2012

20. letmein 

For the first time, NordPass also analysed how pop culture trends influence our password choices.

Among the other most common passwords in the UK are ‘guest’, ‘liverpool’, ‘qwerty’, ‘arsenal’, ‘123456789’, ‘chocolate’ and ‘monkey’.  

They may sound simple to remember, but the concern is how easy they are to hack.

Around 83 per cent of the passwords in this year’s list can be cracked in less than a second, the research shows.

They include ‘passw0rd’, which is slightly less common than ‘password’ but no more secure.

Among women in Britain, ‘charlie’, ‘tigger’ and ‘sunshine’ were the most common, as well as ‘password’, ‘qwerty’ and ‘123456’.

Men, however, were more likely to have the likes of ‘liverpool’, ‘arsenal’ and ‘chelsea’ as their passwords, in reference to their favourite football team.

Using a name to secure accounts also remains a common practice of internet users. 

In the UK, Charlie, Thomas, Jasper, George, and Jessica were top names used as passwords this year, while the world’s most-used people names for password creation were Daniel, Thomas, Jordan, Michael, Marina, and Jessica.

Pre-configured passwords such as ‘welcome’ and ‘guest’ are also commonly used to secure accounts. 

While ‘guest’ is the third most common password in the UK, it is the number one pick in the US.

When it comes to other worldwide trends, researchers noticed that password irritation is also reflected in internet users’ picks this year.

The passwords ‘f***you,” “f***off, “f***you1,” and similar passwords were especially notable in Canada, Australia, and the US.

On the other hand, loving words are extensively used as well — ‘iloveyou’ and its translations into other languages are highly common passwords in most countries.

In the US, men tend to favour numbers in their password. 

The logins ‘12345’, ‘123456’, ‘12345678’, ‘123456789’ and ‘abc123’ were all in the top 10.

When it comes to other worldwide trends, researchers noticed that password irritation is also reflected in internet users' picks this year. The passwords 'f***you," "f***off, "f***you1," and similar passwords were especially notable in Canada, Australia, and the US

When it comes to other worldwide trends, researchers noticed that password irritation is also reflected in internet users’ picks this year. The passwords ‘f***you,” “f***off, “f***you1,” and similar passwords were especially notable in Canada, Australia, and the US

Cinema buffs: This table shows the most popular movie passwords worldwide

Cinema buffs: This table shows the most popular movie passwords worldwide

Looking good: This table shows the most popular fashion brand passwords across the globe

Looking good: This table shows the most popular fashion brand passwords across the globe

THE TOP 50 MOST COMMON PASSWORDS WORLDWIDE

Rank

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50 

Password

password

123456

123456789

guest

qwerty

12345678

111111

12345

col123456

123123

1234567

1234

1234567890

000000

555555

666666

123321

654321

7777777

123

D1lakiss 

777777

110110jp

1111

987654321

121212

Gizli

abc123

112233

azerty

159753

1q2w3e4r

54321

pass@123

 222222

qwertyuiop

qwerty123

qazwsx 

vip

asdasd

123qwe

123654

iloveyou

a1b2c3

999999

Groupd2013

1q2w3e

usr

Liman1000

1111111 

Time to crack it 

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

10 Seconds

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

11 Seconds 

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

3 Hours

< 1 Second

3 Seconds

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

10 Seconds

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

2 Seconds

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

3 Hours

< 1 Second

< 1 Second

3 Hours

< 1 Second

Number of users

4,929,113

1,523,537

413,056

376,417

309,679

284,946

229,047

188,602

140,505

127,762

110,279

106,929

105,189

102,636

98,353

91,274

83,241

81,231

74,233

60,795

50,181

48,903

48,265

47,935

46,891

46,298

44,874

44,587

43,615

43,101

40,141

40,056

39,264

39,046

36,029

35,099

34,530

33,510

33,442

33,177

32,085

31,853

30,871

30,088

28,881

28,397

27,421

26,594

26,576

26,345

It is a similar story with American women, although ‘sunshine’ and ‘princess’ also sneak into the most common list.

Numbers, ‘password’ and ‘guest’ dominate the top 10 for users worldwide, with ‘bigbasket’ jumping into the top 10 for women.

In Spain, the word ‘swing’ is a very common password, while in France ‘azerty’ sneaks in there and in Germany ‘hallo’.

‘xxxxxx’ makes the top 10 in Japan, ‘Brasil’ in Brazil, ‘1982’ in Nigeria and ‘vip’ in Malaysia.

The findings show that, for a hacker, knowing someone’s location and gender can help crack a password because there are common traits.

For example, they found that overall, women used more positive and loving words, such as ‘sunshine’. 

Meanwhile, men tend to use more sports, especially football-related passwords. In some countries, men also used more swear words than women.

Common entertainment terms, including pokemon, superman, blink182, starwars and batman also feature in the list, as do foods like chocolate, cookie and pepper. This table shows artists

Common entertainment terms, including pokemon, superman, blink182, starwars and batman also feature in the list, as do foods like chocolate, cookie and pepper. This table shows artists

Common entertainment terms, including pokemon, superman, blink182, starwars and batman also feature in the list, as do foods like chocolate, cookie and pepper.

‘Mini’, ‘kia’, and ‘ford’ are the most common passwords in the ‘car’ category, and ‘tiffany’, ‘aldo’, and ‘gap’ top the list of fashion brands. 

Compared to the data from 2021, 73 per cent of the 200 most common passwords in 2022 remain the same. 

Cyber security expert Jake Moore told MailOnline: ‘Poor passwords are often an easy way for hackers to get into accounts and there are tools cyber criminals use to help them gain access such as stuffing password fields with well-used passwords. 

‘People often put their passwords on their social media such as their pet names or favourite films, for example.

‘Three random words is a good starting block for passwords but to properly help protect users we really need to see the use of password mangers increased where they are all complex and unique.

‘Password managers should not be feared but many people think that putting all their passwords in one place on the cloud will make them somewhat vulnerable to attack. 

‘However, it’s the opposite that is true. 

‘The clever use of two factor authentication and robust encryption are a far stronger mix than using the same two or three passwords for all accounts.’

TIPS TO SECURE YOUR PASSWORD

1. Be aware of all accounts that are in your possession

Experts recommend deleting unused accounts and knowing the exact number of those that are active. This way, you can prevent gaps in your password management.

2. Make long, unique passwords, and never reuse them

Complicated combinations of numbers, uppercase, lowercase letters, and symbols make the most robust passwords. Reusing them is never an option — if one account gets hacked, other accounts are at risk.

3. Use a password manager

This technological solution fully encrypts the passwords stored in the vault and allows secure sharing. 

Many cybersecurity incidents happen because of simple human mistakes — people leave their passwords openly accessible for others and store them in Excel or other unencrypted applications.

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