NSW: A SECOND dead whale washes ashore Casaurina Beach – a week after another whale died on beach


A SECOND dead whale washes ashore bringing warnings of lurking sharks close to a string of popular beaches

  • Another whale carcass washed up on Casuarina Beach, in northern NSW,
  • The mature female pilot whale was found by beachgoers on Tuesday morning
  • It comes after another dead whale washed up on the same beach on October 5 

A second dead whale has washed up on a beach, a week after lifeguards were forced to issued a shark warning for the same stretch of sand.

A pilot whale was found dead on South Casaurina Beach, in northern NSW, on Tuesday. 

The carcass was disposed of at Stotts Creek Tip by the afternoon, but it has raised fears that such strandings will attract sharks to the area.

A pilot whale was found dead on South Casaurina Beach, in northern NSW, on Tuesday

Jane Lofthouse, Tweed Shire Council’s Unit Coordinator for Sustainability and Environment, said: ‘The best option is to take it to landfill because then we know any leaching is contained and it’s unfortunately the best way to manage a deceased whale carcass.’

It comes after another whale carcass washed up on the same beach on October 5, prompting a shark warning.  

The sharks came closer to shore to feed on the dead whale’s body, forcing beaches to close.

The closed beaches included Salt, Casuarina, Cabarita, Hastings, North Pottsville and South Pottsville.

Chris Smyth from Surf Lifesaving NSW said lifeguards were on roving patrols on jet skis but were no longer able to find the whale carcass on October 6.

The whale carcass washed up on Casuarina Beach in northern New South Wales on Monday afternoon, prompting a warning to stay out of the water

The whale carcass washed up on Casuarina Beach in northern New South Wales on Monday afternoon, prompting a warning to stay out of the water 

The sharks came closer to shore to feed on the dead whale's body, forcing beaches to close

The sharks came closer to shore to feed on the dead whale’s body, forcing beaches to close 

Lifeguards believe it has washed back out to sea.

‘They are putting up signs on the beach and doing a lot of work to inform the public of what has happened,’ Mr Smyth said at the time.

‘People are welcome to come to the beaches – but they must not go into the water.’  

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Department of Primary Industries for comment.

Chris Smyth from Surf Lifesaving NSW said lifeguards are on roving patrols on jet skis but are no longer able to find the whale carcass

Chris Smyth from Surf Lifesaving NSW said lifeguards are on roving patrols on jet skis but are no longer able to find the whale carcass 

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