Nick Weaver’s mother reveals the subtle warning musician had terminal bowel cancer


The grieving mother of Australian musician Nick Weaver has reflected on the subtle warning sign that her son, 37, had been diagnosed with a rare form of metastatic bowel cancer. 

Nick, of Sydney band Deep Sea Arcade, passed away in April, just six months after finding a tumour on his large intestine. 

To honour his legacy, Nick’s mother Helen Wellings has this week released an album titled Won’t Let Go containing songs he was unable to release before passing away. 

Seven journalist Helen Wellings has released her musician son Nick Weaver’s first posthumous album, six months after his death from bowel cancer at age 37. (Pictured is Nick Weaver) 

The 13-track album displays Nick’s incredible musicianship with its psychedelic indie-pop sounds and gut-wrenching lyrics about love and loss. 

Helen, who is Seven’s Consumer Editor, recently spoke to Daily Mail Australia of her son’s incredible musical skill and how a pale complexion was the first sign his talent would be cruelly snuffed out.

‘Nick was just about on the brink of getting this album out there, and then he was diagnosed. It would break his heart if he knew his music was never produced,’ Helen said. 

Helen, who is Seven's Consumer Editor (pictured), recently spoke to Daily Mail Australia of her son's incredible musical skill and how a p ale complexion was the first sign his talent would be cruelly snuffed out

Helen, who is Seven’s Consumer Editor (pictured), recently spoke to Daily Mail Australia of her son’s incredible musical skill and how a p ale complexion was the first sign his talent would be cruelly snuffed out

‘He did take his guitar along to hospital at one stage to try and perfect a couple of things but he was too weak to do it.’ 

In the days before his death, Helen realised his treasured musical works were stored inside his computer, fearing they may never be released.

With the help of Nick’s musician friends, she managed to pull together and produce all the tracks he had been working on. 

'Nick was just about on the brink of getting this album out there, and then he was diagnosed. It would break his heart if he knew his music was never produced,' Helen said. (Nick and Helen are pictured)

‘Nick was just about on the brink of getting this album out there, and then he was diagnosed. It would break his heart if he knew his music was never produced,’ Helen said. (Nick and Helen are pictured) 

‘He was just so involved with music, and these songs are very personal,’ she said, revealing that Nick wrote lead single Don’t Let Go for his now-widowed wife Tia Turner. 

Helen also spoke of Nick’s diagnosis, confirming that he was otherwise completely healthy. 

‘His diagnosis was totally unexpected. Everything was right about his life… and then this was just the most unbelievable thing that could have ever happened, the worst thing that’s ever happened to me, and could ever happen to me,’ Helen said. 

'He was just so involved with music, and these songs are very personal,' she said, revealing that Nick wrote lead single Don't Let Go for his now-widowed wife Tia Turner. (Nick and Tia are pictured together)

‘He was just so involved with music, and these songs are very personal,’ she said, revealing that Nick wrote lead single Don’t Let Go for his now-widowed wife Tia Turner. (Nick and Tia are pictured together) 

‘I just remember about six months before [he died] he looked a bit pale,’ she recalled.

Helen described Nick as being ‘perfectly healthy’ before his diagnosis, noting that he maintained a healthy diet and ‘never ate rubbish’. 

‘I said, ‘Are you having good food and everything?’ And he said, ‘Yes. Mum, you couldn’t get a better diet. I have lots of vegetables and fruit, lots of fish… I’m fine mum,” she continued. 

Helen described Nick as being 'perfectly healthy' before his diagnosis, noting that he maintained a healthy diet and 'never ate rubbish'. (Nick is seen performing with his band Deep Sea Arcade in the Netherlands in 2013)

Helen described Nick as being ‘perfectly healthy’ before his diagnosis, noting that he maintained a healthy diet and ‘never ate rubbish’. (Nick is seen performing with his band Deep Sea Arcade in the Netherlands in 2013) 

In late January, Nick started experiencing stomach pains and rushed to the doctor, but was given a clean bill of health following a bowel screen and pathology. 

Nick struggled to find a doctor who was prepared to take his pains seriously. 

‘Young people find it very hard to get a colonoscopy. Nick was told, ‘You’re young and healthy, you’re only 36, and you’re not likely to have anything wrong with you”, Helen explained. 

Nick and Tia are seen on their wedding day. Tragically the musician passed away just two days later

Nick and Tia are seen on their wedding day. Tragically the musician passed away just two days later

In February, a gastroenterologist finally agreed to give him a colonoscopy, the outcome of which would change their lives forever. 

A large, advanced tumor was found on Nick’s large intestine. It had already spread to his liver. 

He was diagnosed with BRAF Mismatch Repair, a rare and deadly condition that targets young people. 

Nick underwent surgery to have the cancer removed at the beginning of March, but succumbed to the illness one month later in his Sydney home with his wife and mother by his side. 

In late January, Nick started experiencing stomach pains and rushed to the doctor, but was given a clean bill of health following a bowel screen and pathology. (Nick is pictured as a teen playing piano)

In late January, Nick started experiencing stomach pains and rushed to the doctor, but was given a clean bill of health following a bowel screen and pathology. (Nick is pictured as a teen playing piano) 

Before his death, Nick had been in the midst of projects with The Tambourine Girls and he will feature on a Salmon Brothers album which will be released in the coming weeks.  

Nick founded Deep Sea Arcade as a teenager, but he didn’t release their first album, Outlands, until 2012.

The album was noted for its ’60s-inspired sound and received critical acclaim.

Concert promoter Michael Chugg described Deep Sea Arcade in 2013 as ‘one of the best bands in Australia’.  

Deep Sea Arcade toured with bands such as Modest Mouse, The Charlatans, Kaiser Chiefs and Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds.

They performed extensively across the UK and Europe as a headline and support act, and on the festival circuit, including at Australia’s Big Day Out.  

Won’t Let Go is now streaming on music platforms.

Nick founded Deep Sea Arcade as a teenager, but he didn't release their first album, Outlands, until 2012. (Nick is pictured in his formative years playing guitar)

Nick founded Deep Sea Arcade as a teenager, but he didn’t release their first album, Outlands, until 2012. (Nick is pictured in his formative years playing guitar) 

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