New £73 canine collar uses AI tech to analyse barks and tell owners how prized pooch is feeling


The RUFF guide to your dog’s mood: New £73 canine collar uses AI tech to analyse barks and tell owners how their prized pooch is feeling

  • Petpuls uses artificial intelligence to determine the animal’s emotional wellbeing
  • South Korean company compares dog’s bark with database of 100,000 samples
  • Collar can categorise bark into five emotional states from happy, anxious or sad

A new dog collar uses technology to analyse their barks and tell owners how their pet is feeling. 

Petpuls, a South Korean company, uses an artificial intelligence collar to ‘give your dog a voice’.

The company compares a dog’s bark with a database of others to determine the animal’s emotional wellbeing. 

Petpuls, a South Korean company, uses an artificial intelligence collar to ‘give your dog a voice’ and analyse how the animal is feeling

The company compares a dog's bark with a database of others to determine the animal's emotional wellbeing

The company compares a dog’s bark with a database of others to determine the animal’s emotional wellbeing

The database has more than 100,000 samples from 50 breeds of dog in four sizes to compare from. 

The collar can categorise a bark into five emotional states, reports The Times, from happy, anxious, sad, relaxed or angry. 

According to data from the Seoul National University, the device has an Emotional Recognition Accuracy Rate of more than 80%.

The device helps dog owners understand their pet’s emotional and physical wellbeing to ‘manage your dog’s entire life span’. 

It uses voice recognition technology to analyse and track the dog’s wellbeing by day, week and month. 

As it accumulates the ‘dog’s voice data’ the collar will become more accurate in determining the animal’s emotions.   

The collar can categorise a bark into five emotional states from happy, anxious, sad, relaxed or angry

The collar can categorise a bark into five emotional states from happy, anxious, sad, relaxed or angry

Petpuls said: ‘As the dog’s ‘voice’ data is accumulated, Petpuls’ AI-driven database grows even more accurate, helping you to better understand your dog’s emotions, what triggers them and manage its 10-15+ year lifespan.’ 

The collar also serves as an activity tracker, with a built-in sensor to calculate the calories a pet burns from exercise.   

Costing £73, the collar relays the barking data to an app on the owner’s phone via Wi-Fi.

As it accumulates the 'dog's voice data' the collar will become more accurate in determining the animal's emotions

As it accumulates the ‘dog’s voice data’ the collar will become more accurate in determining the animal’s emotions

The app features an emotion and activity graph

It also has a page dedicated to your dog's unique profile called 'My Pet Registration'

The app features an emotion and activity graph, as well as a page dedicated to your dog’s unique profile called ‘My Pet Registration’ 

The app features an emotion and activity graph, as well as a page dedicated to your dog’s ‘Pet Friends’. 

It also includes a ‘My Pet Registration’ feature to create a unique dog profile tailored to your pet.  

The device was the runner-up in the Consumer Electronics Show’s innovation awards for this year.    

How does the collar work? 

Petpuls uses a proprietary algorithm in combination with a database of more than 10K bark samples from 50 breeds of dogs.

This is to detect and determine five different emotional states of your dog with an Emotional Recognition Accuracy Rate of more than 80%. 

It has a built-in accelerometer sensor to calculate how many calories the animal has burned.  

The collar has a battery life of 8-10 hours on a single, full charge.

It has a Wi-Fi pairing distance of within approximately 15 feet, linking to the owner’s smartphone while outdoors and syncing with the app once you’re back on Wi-Fi.   

The Simpsons ‘Baby Translator’ 

The artificial intelligence collar is similar to Herb Powell’s ‘The Baby Translator’. 

He invented the device which translates baby sounds and he demonstrated that the invention worked by voicing Maggie’s babbling. 

His translator worked so well that Herb got a lot of money for it.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk