Mothers claim Asda is promoting paedophilia with T-shirts featuring naked dolls


A mother has called for a boycott of Asda and branded the supermarket ‘disgusting’ for ‘promoting paedophilia’ by selling children’s T-shirts with LGBTQ flag colours and naked trolls with the slogan ‘everybody is free to love’. 

Sky Rodriguez was shocked when she discovered the slogan on tops while shopping at the St Austell Superstore in Cornwall on Monday. 

The events manager, 37, shared an image of the clothing, which is labelled for ages one to 14, on Facebook where other parents said it left them ‘sickened’ but Asda has defended the T-shirt as ‘inclusive’.

The top shows six naked trolls each with a different coloured hair, collectively making up the the colours of a version of the LGBTQ+ flag, underneath rainbow writing which reads: ‘Everybody is free to love’.  

A mother has called for a boycott of Asda and branded the supermarket ‘disgusting’ for ‘promoting paedophilia’ by selling children’s T-shirts with LGBT flag colours and naked trolls with the slogan ‘everybody is free to love’

Save Our Children activist Kiki Marriott believes the shirts ‘promote paedophilia as a sexual orientation’ because she claims the slogan is used by the ‘love has no age’ movement and those attracted to minors. 

The mother-of-one, 34, is so outraged she is calling for a boycott of the store as she claims selling the shirt ‘normalises’ the ‘love has no age’ movement. 

Both mothers complained to Asda and called for the T-shirts to be removed from sale – but Asda defended the slogans as ‘fun and inclusive’ words that ‘celebrate LGBTQ+ culture’. 

It is the second time the supermarket giant has come under fire on the subject, after Baroness Nicholson complained to the chain for using the ‘love has no age limit’ slogan in home learning packs for primary school children in June. 

Save Our Children activist Kiki Marriott believes the shirts 'promote paedophilia as a sexual orientation' as she claims the slogan is used by the 'love has no age' movement and those attracted to minors. She is pictured with her 13-year-old daughter, Princess

Save Our Children activist Kiki Marriott believes the shirts ‘promote paedophilia as a sexual orientation’ as she claims the slogan is used by the ‘love has no age’ movement and those attracted to minors. She is pictured with her 13-year-old daughter, Princess

Sky, from St Austell, Cornwall, said: ‘I was just shocked – I saw it, walked past and then I was like “no” and I went back and thought “I can’t believe that” – that’s when I took a photo. 

‘I’ve been following sex trafficking stuff online and it does make you more aware, but I think the T-shirt was just blatantly obvious and totally inappropriate. 

‘I think it’s giving the wrong message to our children – it normalises not having boundaries and you don’t want them thinking that it’s okay. 

Sky Rodriguez (pictured) was shocked when she discovered the bizarre slogan on tops while shopping at the St Austell Superstore in Cornwall on Monday

Sky Rodriguez (pictured) was shocked when she discovered the bizarre slogan on tops while shopping at the St Austell Superstore in Cornwall on Monday

‘I shared it on Facebook because I felt that people should know – it’s raising awareness and I want everybody to make a stand. 

‘I think if you see something that’s not right like that you’ve got to do something – it’s safeguarding children at the end of the day.’ 

Campaigner Kiki was equally outraged as she claims the T-shirts ‘normalise’ the ‘love has no age’ movement and ‘promote paedophilia as a sexual orientation’. 

Kiki, from south east London, said: ‘I felt disappointed and a bit scared – it’s scary how much they’re trying to normalise this. 

Campaigner Kiki was equally outraged as she claims the T-shirts 'normalise' the 'love has no age' movement and 'promote paedophilia as a sexual orientation'

Campaigner Kiki was equally outraged as she claims the T-shirts ‘normalise’ the ‘love has no age’ movement and ‘promote paedophilia as a sexual orientation’

‘It’s scary how many people are not aware that by their children wearing these clothes, it’s a sign to a very dark world – it is very worrying. 

‘The T-shirt says “everybody is free to love” – that is pretty much a slogan for the ‘love has no age’movement and is the message of minor-attracted persons [MAPs], which is another word for paedophiles. 

‘At the moment there’s loads of people coming out as MAPs and they’re really trying to attach themselves to the LGBTQ community – that’s why they’re using the rainbow colours. 

‘The LGBTQ community are so against it, because no one in their right mind supports paedophilia.’ 

Both concerned mums have complained to Asda and were horrified given the store had been criticised only in June for referencing ‘love has no age limit’ in their primary school packs. 

After Sky shared an image of the T-shirt to Facebook, dozens of parents commented their shock at the design

After Sky shared an image of the T-shirt to Facebook, dozens of parents commented their shock at the design

Kiki said: ‘I just think Asda should be boycotted because this is not the first instance where they’ve sold these types of products. 

‘We need to unite together and boycott them to show that we do not tolerate this and we will not be putting our children in these clothes. 

‘It’s so important to me because I care for not just my own child, but for all children around the world – I care for their safety and ‘love has no age’ is not going to be part of their future. 

‘I’m not the only person that feels like this as there’s a big group of us that are very passionate – we want Asda to be aware that we’re coming for them and are going to campaign against them.’ 

Sky added: ‘I just think there’s an agenda – obviously with the ‘love has no age limit’ packs they’ve sent out as well – why would you put that on a children’s activity pack? It’s just ridiculous. 

Asda came under fire in June when they backed home learning packs for children aged between three and 11 that were created with partner charity Diversity Role Models, which included the slogan 'love has no age limit'. Baroness Nicholson complained to the supermarket about the slogan and Asda's CEO Roger Burnley apologised for the 'clearly inappropriate' material

Asda came under fire in June when they backed home learning packs for children aged between three and 11 that were created with partner charity Diversity Role Models, which included the slogan ‘love has no age limit’. Baroness Nicholson complained to the supermarket about the slogan and Asda’s CEO Roger Burnley apologised for the ‘clearly inappropriate’ material

‘I want better practice from Asda – I hope that they take them off the shelves, stop doing it and are more responsible.’ 

Asda came under fire in June when they backed home learning packs for children aged between three and 11 that were created with partner charity Diversity Role Models, which included the slogan ‘love has no age limit’. 

Baroness Nicholson complained to the supermarket about the slogan and Asda’s CEO Roger Burnley apologised for the ‘clearly inappropriate’ material. 

An Asda spokesperson said: ‘Our rainbow Trolls T-shirts feature fun and inclusive slogans and are part of our wider Pride range which celebrates LGBTQ+ culture. 

Sky (pictured) said the T-shirt is giving children 'the wrong message' as it 'normalises not having boundaries and you don't want them thinking that it's okay'

Sky (pictured) said the T-shirt is giving children ‘the wrong message’ as it ‘normalises not having boundaries and you don’t want them thinking that it’s okay’

Kiki (pictured) was outraged by the product and called for the supermarket to be boycotted,  as 'this is not the first instance where they've sold these types of products'

Kiki (pictured) was outraged by the product and called for the supermarket to be boycotted,  as ‘this is not the first instance where they’ve sold these types of products’

‘As an inclusive organisation that welcomes customers and colleagues from all backgrounds, we are proud to support Pride.’  

The red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet was designed by American artist Gilbert Baker’s in the 1960s, and has become internationally recognised as symbol of the LGBTQ+ community.

But in recent years many groups, including the London mayor’s office, have added the black and brown stripes to the flags, adopting ‘The Progress Flag’ to acknowledge the struggles of people of colour and trans people. 

Although it was first designed by graphic designer Daniel Quasar in 2018, the flag has seen widespread coverage this year after many people used the rainbow flag to support the NHS amid the coronavirus pandemic.  

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