More men than women died in England and Wales last year – the first time since 1981 


Covid blamed as more men than women died in England and Wales last year – the first time since 1981

  • Pandemic saw more men than women die in 2020 for the first time since 1981
  • ONS figures showed that 308,069 men died in England and Wales last year 
  • Coronavirus cause of death for 13.3 per cent of men and 10.9 per cent of women 

The coronavirus pandemic saw more men than women die in 2020 for the first time since 1981, figures have revealed.

Raw figures, released by the Office for National Statistics, showed that 308,069 men died in England and Wales last year compared to 299,853 women.  

The sharp rise in male death rates comes as it was also revealed that England and Wales recorded more deaths last year during the coronavirus pandemic than at anytime since the Spanish flu outbreak of 1918. 

Prior to 1981, women accounted for a greater proportion of the death toll due to two key factors – women have a higher life expectancy than men and there are more women than men. 

Raw figures released by the Office for National Statistics showed that 308,069 men died in England and Wales last year compared to 299,853 women. Pictured: The National Covid memorial wall

However the latest figures show that of the 73,766 coronavirus-registered deaths last year, 40,995 (55.6 per cent) were men. 

The statistics showed that the Covid pandemic saw 8,216 more men die than women last year and coronavirus was the cause of death for 13.3 per cent of men but just 10.9 per cent of women. 

It comes as separate figures from the ONS showed England and Wales recorded more deaths last year during the coronavirus pandemic than at anytime since the Spanish flu outbreak of 1918. 

There were a total of 607,922 deaths in England and Wales last year, of which 72,950 (12 per cent) were caused by Covid. More may have died indirectly from the virus, including tens of thousands who may have struggled to get healthcare in lockdown. 

It is the highest death toll since 1918 when 611,861 people died, including 228,000 directly from the H1N1 flu strain that sparked the last global pandemic. 

Figures also showed the death rates last year were highest in the North East, which saw 1,399 per 100,000 men die and 1,045 per 100,000 women die over the year. 

They were followed by the North West (1,392 and 1,024), Yorkshire and the Humber (1,358 and 968) and East Midlands (1,277 and 921). 

England and Wales recorded more deaths last year than anytime since the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 because of Covid, the ONS said

England and Wales recorded more deaths last year than anytime since the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 because of Covid, the ONS said

Rates were lowest in the South West (1,098 and 791), South East (1,106 and 807) and London (1,171 and 812).

But the death rates for Covid varied significantly, with the North West recording the most fatalities caused by the disease. Some 178 per 100,000 people died with Covid in the region.

It was followed by London (167), the North East (167) and Yorkshire and the Humber (155).

The South West recorded the lowest rate of Covid deaths, with the disease causing 59 per 100,000 people to die.

Official figures today showed Britain’s daily Covid hospital admissions have reached a four month high, rising by 50 per cent in a week to their highest level since March.

Department of Health figures showed hospitalisations reached 406 on June 30 — the most recent day figures are available for. 

Covid deaths also jumped their highest level since the end of April, increasing 20.3 per cent in a week. Another 37 victims were recorded today.

Meanwhile, infections are continuing to spiral across the UK, jumping to 28,773 — up 49 per cent on last Tuesday and the highest daily figure since January 29.   

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk