Men who drink ONE soda per day are more likely to go bald


Drinking just ONE soda per day raises risk of going bald in men by up to 60%, study suggests

  • One sugary drink each day can significantly increase a man’s risk of hair loss
  • Experts believe the drinks harm insulin resistance and cause alopecia
  • Baldness in men is usually inevitable, but can be pushed back with a good diet 

It takes just one soda per day to significantly raise a man’s risk of losing his hair, a study suggests. 

Researchers found those who drank at least one sugary drink a day had a 57 percent higher risk of suffering male pattern hair loss than those who rarely consumed them.

The team said the findings likely apply to any drink high in sugar, including coffee, tea and sports beverages — but not diet sodas.

This is because sugar is the problem. Too much causes insulin resistance, which hampers blood circulation and is believed to damage hair follicles.

Drinking one sugary drink like soda each day can raise a man’s risk of hair loss 57 percent, but even just one drink a week can cause balding (file photo)

There are anecdotal reports that the number of Americans suffering from hair loss has increased in recent years.

The poor diet of many Americans may be making them more vulnerable to hair loss, alongside a host of other conditions.

According to most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data, 63 percent of children and 50 percent of adults drink a sugary drink on any given day.

Previous research has linked both conditions to hair loss occurring earlier than otherwise in men.

Poor diets and consumption of unhealthy foods like sodas are the leading cause of obesity and diabetes in the US.

In their study, published Sunday in the journal Nutrients, researchers from Tsinghua University in Beijing gathered survey data from 1,028 men aged 18 to 45.

The men reported whether they had experienced balding, dietary habits, mental health issues, and biographical information like education level and age.

These included asking participants how often they ate different types of foods –  from fruits and vegetables to snacks and sugary beverages like soda.

They found men who ate an unhealthy diet that included soda, fried food, sugar and sweets like ice cream each day were more likely to suffer baldness.

With a focus on sugary drinks in particular, they then built a model that would adjust for other factors like age, weight, mental health conditions and other dietary choices to isolate the beverages.

They found that drinking sugary soda one to three times a week carried a 21 percent increased risk of hair loss, while drinking four to seven sugar-loaded beverages raised the risk to 26 percent.

The findings represent a correlation, meaning experts cannot say for sure that other lifestyle factors play a role.

While a poor diet appears to be linked to baldness, the researchers did not find a protective effect link between eating healthily.

Balding is an inevitability for a majority of men. Around two-thirds of men will have experienced hair loss by age 35 – with the figure only increasing with age.

When a man experiences balding is determined by a combination of genetics and lifestyle. 

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OBESITY ON THE RISE IN AMERICA’S YOUNGEST CHILDREN 

The rate of childhood obesity has tripled since the 1970s, affecting one in five children in the US and 14% of those between ages two and four years old, according to CDC data.

Childhood obesity is now the number one health concern among parents in the US, topping drug abuse and smoking. 

Obesity continues to plague more than one-third of adults in the US, and experts have warned that that proportion will only grow as younger generations do. 

Over the last two decades, the US has implemented countless awareness programs to try to combat the obesity epidemic.

Former First Lady Michelle Obama became a mascot for healthier children while her husband was in office, spearheading the ‘Let’s Move’ campaign, designed to motivate children to eat healthier and stay active in an effort to promote overall health.

But under the Trump administation , the US Department of Agriculture announced that it would relax the school lunch guidelines she championed – requiring more fresh fruits and vegetables and low-sugar dining options – in favor of new rules that would allow sweetened milk and sodium rich entrees.

 

OBESITY ON THE RISE IN AMERICA’S YOUNGEST CHILDREN

The rate of childhood obesity has tripled since the 1970s, affecting one in five children in the US and 14% of those between ages two and four years old, according to CDC data. Childhood obesity is now the number one health concern among parents in the US, topping drug abuse and smoking.   

Obesity continues to plague more than one-third of adults in the US, and experts have warned that that proportion will only grow as younger generations do. 

Over the last two decades, the US has implemented countless awareness programs to try to combat the obesity epidemic.

Former First Lady Michelle Obama became a mascot for healthier children while her husband was in office, spearheading the ‘Let’s Move’ campaign, designed to motivate children to eat healthier and stay active in an effort to promote overall health.

But under the Trump administation , the US Department of Agriculture announced that it would relax the school lunch guidelines she championed – requiring more fresh fruits and vegetables and low-sugar dining options – in favor of new rules that would allow sweetened milk and sodium rich entrees.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk