Mel Schilling takes a stroll outside in London after spending Christmas being treated for colon cancer

Married At First Sight’s Mel Schilling has been spotted out and about, taking in the brisk London air following her recent health scare.

Just days after Christmas, which she spent undergoing treatment for colon cancer, Schilling, 52, shared a radiant selfie on social media.

With temperatures in the English capital clocking in at a mere 11°C, Mel wrapped herself in a striking pink coat and kept warm with a cozy grey scarf around her neck.

The reality TV star boasted a broad smile and wore oversized shades for the selfie.

It comes just days after the London-based Aussie took to social media to share a heartfelt message about the challenges she faced last year. 

Married At First Sight’s Mel Schilling was spotted out and about taking in the brisk London air with a sunny smile just weeks after being treated for colon cancer

As 2023 came to a close, Schilling reflected on her experiences, sharing that despite not typically participating in New Year’s resolutions, the past year’s events have led her to a different outlook.

She expressed gratitude for the support and welcome she received from the people in the UK and Ireland, which has made her feel at home away from Australia. 

‘I’ve been so touched by the warmth and generosity that the people of the UK & Ireland have showed me, I’ve been made to feel so welcome by you all and am so appreciative of that,’ she wrote.

It comes just days after the London-based Aussie took to social media to share a heartfelt message about the challenges she faced last year

It comes just days after the London-based Aussie took to social media to share a heartfelt message about the challenges she faced last year 

‘Whilst I will always be a proud Aussie I feel like an honorary Brit and the UK really feels like home.’

However, her narrative takes a sombre turn as she reveals the ‘life-changing lows’ that have cast a shadow over her year.

She shared the personal tragedy of losing her brother-in-law at just 35, a preventable loss that has highlighted the preciousness of health and life.

In a year that swung between personal triumphs and profound challenges, Mel has embraced a new perspective on life's preciousness after her own cancer surgery

In a year that swung between personal triumphs and profound challenges, Mel has embraced a new perspective on life’s preciousness after her own cancer surgery

'I've been so touched by the warmth and generosity that the people of the UK & Ireland have showed me, I've been made to feel so welcome by you all and am so appreciative of that,' she wrote

‘I’ve been so touched by the warmth and generosity that the people of the UK & Ireland have showed me, I’ve been made to feel so welcome by you all and am so appreciative of that,’ she wrote

‘The tragedy of his passing was that it could have been prevented. Had he and all of us heeded the health warnings he’d still be with us,’ she explained.

‘The terrible irony is that 6 months later I too compromised my health while pursuing my goals and it almost cost me my life, it’s not a mistake I intend to repeat.

‘While my cancer journey isn’t over and there will be some tough challenges ahead, I feel so incredibly grateful to be given this second chance, a second chance denied to so many.’

Mel recently revealed her tumour – which she named ‘Terry’ – had been removed by UK doctors.

‘So yesterday lunchtime I had keyhole surgery to remove my tumour (AKA Terry) and in the words of my amazing surgeon it couldn’t have gone any better!’ Mel wrote.

'While my cancer journey isn't over and there will be some tough challenges ahead, I feel so incredibly grateful to be given this second chance, a second chance denied to so many'

‘While my cancer journey isn’t over and there will be some tough challenges ahead, I feel so incredibly grateful to be given this second chance, a second chance denied to so many’

She accompanied her post a photo of the TV star in a hospital bed, giving a thumbs up with a tube in her nose.

Mel added: ‘Crucially the cancer hadn’t spread to my abdominal cavity, which was our greatest fear but was entirely localised in my colon.’

‘Over the coming days I will discuss my treatment plan going forwards but suffice to say that Terry is toast!’

Mel then revealed her treatment had taken place in London and went on to praise the UK’s National Health Service (NHS).

‘I also wanted to say that everyone in the UK should be incredibly proud of the people of the NHS.’

She added, ‘The NHS is a unique, precious institution we need to make sure it’s here to serve our children and our children’s children.’

Symptoms of colon cancer

Symptoms of colon cancer can include:

  • A change in bowel habits, such as more frequent diarrhea or constipation
  • Rectal bleeding or blood in the stool. Ongoing discomfort in the belly area, such as cramps, gas or pain
  • A feeling that the bowel doesn’t empty all the way during a bowel movement
  • Weakness or tiredness
  • Losing weight without trying

Many people with colon cancer don’t have symptoms at first. When symptoms appear, they’ll likely depend on the cancer’s size and where it is in the large intestine. 

Source: Mayo Clinic

 

Now, it’s time to focus on getting my a** out of here in time for Christmas,’ concluded the reality TV host.

Mel, who appears on the British and Australian versions of the show, first revealed she had colon cancer in an Instagram post last week.

In her post, Mel said she was diagnosed just one month after she began to feel pain in her stomach while filming MAFS Australia’s upcoming eleventh season.

Despite her heartbreaking situation, Mel said she felt ‘incredibly blessed’ her cancer is ‘relatively easy to eradicate’.

Mel, (right, with MAFS Australia experts Alessandra Rampolla and John Aiken) first revealed she had colon cancer in an Instagram post last week

Mel, (right, with MAFS Australia experts Alessandra Rampolla and John Aiken) first revealed she had colon cancer in an Instagram post last week

Common symptoms of colon cancer include a change in bowel habits, rectal bleeding, anal or rectal pain, lumps, unexpected weight loss, fatigue and anaemia.

Doctors recommend that people with an average risk of the cancer start screening at around age 45.

Those with a higher risk should start screening earlier.

Colon cancer treatment usually involves surgical removal of the cancer.

Other treatments like radiation therapy and chemotherapy may be recommended, depending on the location and stage of the cancer.

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