Long Lost Family: Man, 31, was left in public toilets near Wolverhampton Wanderers FC’s stadium


A man who was abandoned as a baby in public toilets near a football stadium was left speechless after finding both his parents on Long Lost Family: Born Without Trace. 

Steve Bull, now 31, was discovered as a newborn outside Wolverhampton Wanderers FC’s stadium, in the West Midlands, before being adopted by a loving family in Manchester.

But after being made aware by his adoptive parents about his start in life, Steve had always longed to discover answers about his parents’ identity.

He appeared on tonight’s ITV programme, and thanks to the show’s DNA team, found both his parents – later meeting his father Rob, who didn’t know about his birth, in emotional scenes.

Steve was also given a photograph and letter from his mother, who isn’t identified on camera. A speechless Steve was told by his birth mother that the circumstances she had to deal with ‘were not nice, and that’s all I can say’. 

Steve Bull (pictured), now 31, was discovered as a newborn outside Wolverhampton Wanderers FC’s stadium, in the West Midlands, before being adopted by a loving family in Manchester

But after being made aware by his adoptive parents about his start in life, Steve had always longed to discover answers about his parents' identity. Pictured, Steve as a baby

But after being made aware by his adoptive parents about his start in life, Steve had always longed to discover answers about his parents’ identity. Pictured, Steve as a baby 

At the time Steve was found near the stadium, he was named after Wolverhampton Wanderers’ most popular player of that time, Steve Bull. 

Steve was made aware by his adoptive parents about his start in life but despite a public appeal, he said he has grown up with no information about why he was left and by whom.

Steve told the show: ‘I was just the baby who was found. My history before is 100 per cent unknown.’ 

In tonight’s programme, Steve finally discovered how he came into the world, with the show being able to find both of his birth parents. 

Steve visited his birth father for the first time, and it was revealed to him the struggles that his birth mother faced as a young woman. 

He appeared on tonight's ITV programme, and thanks to the show's DNA team, found both his parents - later meeting his father Rob (pictured together), who didn't know about his birth, in emotional scenes

He appeared on tonight’s ITV programme, and thanks to the show’s DNA team, found both his parents – later meeting his father Rob (pictured together), who didn’t know about his birth, in emotional scenes

Steve (pictured meeting his birth father) was also given a photograph and letter from his mother, who isn't identified on camera. A speechless Steve was told by his birth mother that the circumstances she had to deal with 'were not nice, and that's all I can say'

Steve (pictured meeting his birth father) was also given a photograph and letter from his mother, who isn’t identified on camera. A speechless Steve was told by his birth mother that the circumstances she had to deal with ‘were not nice, and that’s all I can say’

Co-host Davina McCall joined Steve at his home to tell him that the Long Lost Family team had found both his parents.

‘That’s actually really surprising. My heart’s racing right now, I can really, really feel it in my chest,’ he said to the news about his father’s identity.

Rob was 22 when Steve was born and was unaware of his birth because at the time he had to go away because of undisclosed circumstances.

‘I’d like to meet him,’ Steve said, before adding about his two paternal half-sisters: ‘I’ve always wanted a sister, and now you tell me I’ve got two.’

When told the team had also discovered his birth mother, an emotional Steve admitted: ‘That’s a lot. It’s a lot…’

He was then given the letter penned by his birth mother, which read: ‘Hi Steve. Gorgeous boy.

At the time Steve was found near the stadium, he was named after Wolverhampton Wanderers' most popular player of that time, Steve Bull. Pictured, Steve as a baby

At the time Steve was found near the stadium, he was named after Wolverhampton Wanderers’ most popular player of that time, Steve Bull. Pictured, Steve as a baby

‘This is hard. I can’t explain the circumstances, they were not nice and that’s all I can say,’ she admitted. ‘I’ve never, ever gotten over you. 

‘I would light a candle for you every March 17. I found a story about you years ago in a magazine, you look so happy with your family and I’m glad of that, and I’m sorry I did what I did. 

‘Be happy always, I’ll always love you. Blessed be, always,’ she concluded.

After reading the letter, Steve shared his relief that he’d finally been given answers about his parents’ identity.

‘Even this is enough, so I can put it to rest,’ he told Davina. ‘It’s a huge relief. I mean, if she never feels comfortable meeting me, I understand that. This is more than I could’ve hoped for really. Amazing.’

Later in the programme, Steve met with his birth father Rob after the pair had taken Covid tests to greet each other safely.

‘It’s a happy day to meet my son,’ said Rob. ‘I just can’t wait to see him, just to say sorry. I wish I could’ve been there through his life, but now I can be. Today is my chance to put things right, I hope I can.’

After chatting with one another, the duo soon discovered their shared love of art, showcasing their work to each other.  

‘This is a good foundation to build on now,’ said Steve, who also met one of his half-sisters. ‘I’m feeling really happy.  Hopefully we might be able to build some sort of relationship going forward.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk