Lock-gown: Shopper wears a bath robe for a trip to The Range


Shoppers in bath robes and dressing gowns were spotted at The Range today, with others stocking up on fences, paint and lamp shades despite police ordering Brits to buy only essential items amid the coronavirus lockdown.

Yesterday, officers issued a series of guidelines on what are ‘reasonable’ excuses to leave home, such as buying several days’ worth of food.

They specifically banned buying paint and brushes for decoration, but that didn’t stop some shoppers at The Range in Gloucester today. 

Several were spotted picking up non-essential items despite police warnings, opening themselves to potential fines for breaching lockdown. 

Two women, in dressing gowns, smirked as they left the store clutching their shopping.

A man, in Hugo Boss sliders, swung around a tin of paint in one hand, while clutching a can of Red Bull in his other. 

These two women wore dressing gowns as they visited The Range in Gloucester today to stock up on goods

They were two of several shoppers who visited the retailer, despite police releasing guidelines on what counts as an essential journey

They were two of several shoppers who visited the retailer, despite police releasing guidelines on what counts as an essential journey

A man, in Hugo Boss sliders, picked up a tin of paint from the store, as well as a can of Red Bull

A man, in Hugo Boss sliders, picked up a tin of paint from the store, as well as a can of Red Bull

A couple, both in masks, also left the store with non-essential items in hand, the man carrying two lamps and the woman clutching a trio of potted plants. 

Gardening seemed high on the agenda, with several customers snapped leaving the store with large bags of soil. 

What do police say is banned during the coronavirus lockdown? 

NECESSITIES

Buying paint and brushes, simply to  redecorate a kitchen

EXERCISE

Driving for a prolonged period with only brief exercise.

A short walk to a park bench, when the person remains seated for a much longer period.

WORK 

A person who can work from home choosing to work in a local park

A person knocking on doors offering to do cash-in-hand work.

OTHER REASONS 

Visiting a vet’s surgery in person to renew a prescription (where this could be done over the phone).

Visiting a friend in their address or meeting in public to socialise.

One woman even had a member of staff carry a section of fencing for her, while she pushed a trolley filled with bags of compost and other items. 

Other items purchased by shoppers include ironing boards, carpets and curtail rails. 

The latest photos come after police unveiled what they consider to be essential reasons to leave the home amid the lockdown, which has been extended by three weeks, having started on March 23.

Police told people in England they can go out to buy alcohol , take an animal to the vet or stop to have a rest while on a walk during the lockdown. 

The list issued by the National Police Chief’s Council and College of Policing also says people should be allowed to collect surplus basic food items from a friend.

It also permits providing support to vulnerable people or moving to a friend’s address for several days to allow a ‘cooling-off’ following arguments at home.

Other permitted acts include buying a small amount of a staple item or necessity, and purchasing tools to repair a fence panel damaged in recent bad weather.

They can also stop to rest or to eat lunch while on a long walk, or drive to the countryside and walking – where far more time is spent walking than driving.

A couple, both in masks, also left the store with non-essential items in hand, the man carrying two lamps and the woman clutching a trio of potted plants

A couple, both in masks, also left the store with non-essential items in hand, the man carrying two lamps and the woman clutching a trio of potted plants

Though wearing a mask, the man picked up lamps - items that can hardly be considered essential

Though wearing a mask, the man picked up lamps – items that can hardly be considered essential 

One woman enlisted a store worker to help move some fencing to her car, while she pushed a trolley laden with compost and other items

One woman enlisted a store worker to help move some fencing to her car, while she pushed a trolley laden with compost and other items

Shoppers have been urged by police to stay home and only go out to buy essentials

Shoppers have been urged by police to stay home and only go out to buy essentials 

Gardening was high up on the list of several shoppers - including this woman who filled a trolley with compost

Gardening was high up on the list of several shoppers – including this woman who filled a trolley with compost

Another customer who seems set on some urgent lockdown gardening, stocking up on soil

Another customer who seems set on some urgent lockdown gardening, stocking up on soil

Forms of acceptable exercise during the period include going for a run or cycle or practicing yoga, walking in the countryside or in cities and attending an allotment.

What do police say is banned during the coronavirus lockdown? 

NECESSITIES

Buying paint and brushes, simply to  redecorate a kitchen

EXERCISE

Driving for a prolonged period with only brief exercise.

A short walk to a park bench, when the person remains seated for a much longer period.

WORK 

A person who can work from home choosing to work in a local park

A person knocking on doors offering to do cash-in-hand work.

OTHER REASONS 

Visiting a vet’s surgery in person to renew a prescription (where this could be done over the phone).

Visiting a friend in their address or meeting in public to socialise.

Employees are allowed to travel to work whether or not they are key or essential staff, as long as it is not reasonably possible to work from home.

However, police say it is not reasonable for people to go out to buy paint and brushes, simply to redecorate a kitchen.

Driving for a prolonged period with only brief exercise is also banned, as is a short walk to a park bench, when the person remains seated for a much longer period.

In addition, police say a person should not work in a local park if they can work from home, and no one should be knocking on doors offering cash-in-hand work.

They also say that visiting a vet’s surgery in person to renew a prescription where this could be done over the phone is also banned.

Furthermore, visiting a friend in their home or meeting in public to socialise is also banned.

It comes as Britain’s coronavirus daily death toll today dipped slightly to 847, fuelling hopes that the UK’s fatality curve is finally flattening after days of uncertainty.

Fewer than 900 deaths have been recorded in British hospitals for six days in a row, suggesting the darkest days of the crisis could now be behind us.

April 10 was Britain’s deadliest day with 980 deaths – it was the worst day on record for any country in Europe only recording hospital deaths, overtaking Spain’s previous high of 950 on April 3.

The UK’s coronavirus death toll now stands at 14,576 but it is feared thousands of hidden victims are being missed because of a delay in recording hospital fatalities and the failure to include ones in care homes.

This man picked up a range of items, including sponges, plant pots and a cushion on his trip

This man picked up a range of items, including sponges, plant pots and a cushion on his trip

The shoppers were snapped a day after police released guidelines on what counts as essential shopping

The shoppers were snapped a day after police released guidelines on what counts as essential shopping

This man, dressed in a Superman t-shirt, only picked up an ironing board on his trip to the store

This man, dressed in a Superman t-shirt, only picked up an ironing board on his trip to the store

Customers risked fines and catching the coronavirus as they breached lockdown to head to The Range today

Customers risked fines and catching the coronavirus as they breached lockdown to head to The Range today

Despite figures showing the daily death curve was levelling off after a 13 per cent jump yesterday, the number of new cases has spiked, raising concerns the killer infection is still spreading rampantly through Britain.

Data released by the Department of Health, which gives a daily update of the COVID-19 crisis in the UK each day, shows 108,692 Britons have now been infected – a jump of 5,599 in 24 hours.

It comes after a leading public health expert dramatically warned today Britain could suffer 40,000 coronavirus deaths in the first outbreak – and said the UK could suffer 10 waves of the vicious illness.

Professor Anthony Costello, of University College London, blasted the Government’s handling of the crisis, saying it was ‘too slow’ to react.

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