Lizzo treats ER staffers to lunch; Elton’s benefit raises $8M

From delivering food to hospital staff to making major donations to finding ways to help fans cope to sheltering in place, here’s a look at some of the ways the entertainment industry is reacting to the spread of the coronavirus, which most people recover from but can cause severe illness in the elderly and those with preexisting medical conditions.

Lunch on Lizzo 

Singer-songwriter Lizzo brought lunch to staff at a Michigan hospital, expressing gratitude for their services during coronavirus pandemic, according to hospital officials.

In a Monday Twitter post, Henry Ford Hospital officials announced that the Detroit artist provided emergency room personnel with a meal, The Detroit News reported.

“We did everything we could to keep it safe for y’all… I love you guys,” Lizzo said in a video posted on online.

“Thank you so much for being the heroes in this story. And we’re staying inside and we’re praying and thinking of you guys every single day. God bless you.”

Detroit Health Department reported that 1,804 people have tested positive for coronavirus and there have been 50 virus related deaths in the city as of noon Monday.

“Lizzo, from the bottom of our hearts, thank you so much for making our day brighter with your generosity,” Henry Ford officials tweeted.

Lizzo won best pop solo performance, urban contemporary album prize and traditional R&B performance at the Grammy Awards in January.

Elton raises millions

The Elton John-led starry benefit concert that featured Billie Eilish, Mariah Carey and Alicia Keys on Sunday has raised nearly $8 million US to battle the coronavirus.

The musicians performed from their homes for the hourlong event that aired on Fox and iHeartMedia radio stations. The money will go to Feeding America and First Responders Children’s Foundation.

Other performers included Tim McGraw, H.E.R. and Sam Smith, who sang How Do You Sleep acappella. Dave Grohl sang My Hero from his studio in Hawaii, Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong strummed his guitar to Boulevard of Broken Dreams, while Camila Cabello sang My Oh My from Miami with a guitar assist from beau Shawn Mendes.

The event took place during the time slot that was to belong to the iHeartRadio Music Awards. Procter & Gamble donated $500,000 US, which Fox Corporation matched. YouTube, is streaming the concert on iHeartRadio’s YouTube Channel.

Rihanna opens her purse again

Rihanna’s Clara Lionel Foundation is donating $1 million US in grants toward COVID-19 response — a number that is being matched by Jay-Z’s Shawn Carter Foundation.

The combined $2 million US will support undocumented workers, the children of front-line health workers and first responders and the incarcerated, elderly and homeless populations in New York City and Los Angeles.

Last week, the Clara Lionel Foundation gave $5 million US to the response efforts against the coronavirus, with the money going to food banks, testing, healthcare worker training, virus prevention and distribution of critical respiratory supplies.

Songwriters gala postponed, country festival cancelled

Mariah Carey, The Isley Brothers and the Eurythmics will have to wait a year before they get inducted into The Songwriters Hall of Fame, which rescheduled its annual gala to June 2021. Others who made the 2020 — now 2021 — class include Steve Miller, The Neptunes (the hit production team comprised of Pharrell Williams and Chad Hugo), Rick Nowels and William Stevenson.

Songwriter Paul Williams will be receiving the prestigious Johnny Mercer Award and Universal Music Publishing Chairman and CEO, Jody Gerson will receive the Abe Olman Publisher Award.

Meanwhile, the Country Music Association has cancelled its annual CMA Fest, which has been held for more than 40 years and draws thousands of country music fans to Nashville each June. It is also a major fundraising event that contributes to the CMA Foundation, which provides money for music education.

According to a statement, those who purchased passes for this year can use them for the 2021 festival or request a refund. Organizers said they “cannot in good conscience risk the health and well-being of our fans, artists, staff and country music community.”



Read more at CBC.ca

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