Leader of organization behind fake status cards facing sex charges involving minor

The leader of a self-described Indigenous organization that distributed fake Indian status cards is facing three sex-related charges involving a minor, court records show.

Guillaume Carle, 59, has been charged by Gatineau, Que., police with inviting or inciting a minor under 14 to touch a third party for a sexual purpose. He is also charged with touching a part of the body of a minor under 14 for a sexual purpose and for being a party to a sexual assault.

None of the charges have been proven in court. His next court appearance is scheduled for Sept. 25.

The charges were formally filed on Sept. 12, court records show. All three charges stem from incidents alleged to have occurred between March 1, 1988, and April 30, 1989, according to court records.

The court records indicate there is one alleged victim. CBC News is withholding the name of the victim. 

Carle denied the allegations in an interview with CBC News. 

Carle is the grand chief of the Confederation of Aboriginal Peoples of Canada which has faced investigations over the issuing of fake Indian status cards. 

The organization was using Indigenous ancestry DNA tests conducted by Toronto lab Viaguard Accu-Metrics to determine its card-holding membership.

Earlier this year, CBC News reported that the lab returned positive Indigenous ancestry results on two dog DNA samples. The lab also found three CBC employees born in India and Russia had the same percentage of Indigenous ancestry.

Gatineau police spokesperson Andrée East confirmed the charges against Carle.

“Considering that a judicial process is in progress and out of respect for the victim we will not give any details concerning this file,” said East in a statement.

The Gatineau police investigation dates back to at least June 14 when Carle was first issued a no-contact order for the alleged victim. 

‘It’s not true’

In an interview with CBC News, Carle said that a trial would prove he is innocent. 

“I am saying they are more than false,” he said. “Like I said to the police, number one, you can’t win this because it’s not true.”

Carle said that he doesn’t personally know the alleged victim, but does know their father and brother.

“I don’t know him; I know who he is,” he said. “What can you say — you don’t know who he is and you’ve never done that.”

Carle said he faced his own abuse as a youth and had to go through treatment.

“I didn’t do that. I have two children,” he said.

Read more at CBC.ca