La Nina end DOESN’T mean rain end: why Great Wet is back, awful until SUMMER? Will sun EVER return? 


Australia’s east coast will continue to be hammered by relentless rain until at least the start of summer, experts have warned, as tens of thousands are evacuated with homes being lost to floodwaters.

The La Nina weather event declared in November, 2021, brought record rainfall with devastating consequences for low-lying areas across New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria.

But although meteorologists declared the wet weather system had officially ended last week, they added that easterly winds are likely to sweep torrential rain in from the ocean for several months.

Large swathes of Greater Sydney, as well as other parts of NSW, are currently battling this phenomenon with an east coast low inundating rivers and swamping nearby communities.

More than 30,000 resident were ordered to evacuate their homes on Monday night with the NSW State Emergency Service warning that if people ignore evacuation orders, ‘it may be too dangerous to rescue you’.

The NSW State Emergency Service has warned that people ignoring evacuation orders may not be rescued

Anyone is low-lying parts of Woronora and Bonnet Bay on the Woronora River in In the Sutherland Shire, were told to get out before 7pm and 8pm.

The suburbs impacted include Harrison Avenue, McKinley Avenue, Washington Drive, Wilson Place, Johnson Close, Arthur Place and properties on Lower Washington Drive backing on to Johnson Close.

‘Once floodwater reaches 2.4metres at the Woronora Bridge, the area will be isolated,’ the SES said on social media. 

‘If you remain in the area after 7pm Monday July 4, you may be trapped without power, water and other essential services and it may be too dangerous to rescue you.’

Evacuees are advised to stay with family, friends or at accomodation outside flood areas. 

Anybody unable to do so can go to an evacuation centre at Gymea Tradies, 57 Manchester Road, Gymea.  

The Bureau of Meteorology has also declared major flooding is possible at Liverpool and Milperra tonight, with resident urged to stay vigilant.

Many areas on the Hawkesbury including – Windsor, Sackville and Wisemans Ferry – remain mostly underwater after a massive downpour on Sunday. 

The SES earlier on Monday were forced to issue evacuation orders for Cattai, Sackville North, Londonderry and Richards as the river started to rise.

A man is rescued from his car by State Emergency Service workers in Windsor on July 4, 2022 in Sydney, Australia

A man is rescued from his car by State Emergency Service workers in Windsor on July 4, 2022 in Sydney, Australia

Residents look out toward flooded buildings next to the old Windsor Bridge along the overflowing Hawkesbury River in the north-western Sydney suburb of Windsor on July 4, 2022

Residents look out toward flooded buildings next to the old Windsor Bridge along the overflowing Hawkesbury River in the north-western Sydney suburb of Windsor on July 4, 2022

Pictured: Bureau of Meteorology graphic highlighting how La Niña works

 Pictured: Bureau of Meteorology graphic highlighting how La Niña works

Effects of La Nina:

Increased rainfall across much of Australia

Cooler daytime temperatures (south of the tropics)

Warmer overnight temperatures (in the north)

Shift in temperature extremes

Decreased frost risk

Greater tropical cyclone numbers

Earlier monsoon onset

Source: Bureau of Meteorology

Weatherzone meteorologist Joel Pippard told Daily Mail Australia June’s weather was mainly caused by an increase in dry westerly winds which have changed direction.

‘What has changed with this current system is the winds have turned easterly again, so they’re coming in off the ocean once again,’ she explained. 

‘It seems fairly likely there will be showers for at least the coming week.’

She said the La Nina system which normally takes hold in spring and summer stuck around up until last week 

‘Usually it breaks down in March or April, so it got all the way to the end of June, which is very late,’ she said.

‘When you have that happening, you still have the residual effects of La Nina, which is the warm waters close to the east coast.

‘That’s the difference between a climate outlook and a weather event.’

Many areas in NSW have been inundated with with months worth of rain in just a couple of days on Sunday and Monday.

‘This is what we have to look out for, basically for the rest of the year,’ she said.

‘Even if the climate drivers indicate that it might be drier, there is the chance that if we get a system where winds start to come from the east again, we could get more significant falls of rain.’

People view the flooded Windsor Bridge along the Hawkesbury River on July 4, 2022 in Sydney, Australia

People view the flooded Windsor Bridge along the Hawkesbury River on July 4, 2022 in Sydney, Australia

There is not much sunshine to come in the coming weeks, or possibly months. Pictured is a weather chart

There is not much sunshine to come in the coming weeks, or possibly months. Pictured is a weather chart

Woronara Dam, which supplies water to the Sutherland Shire in Sydney's south, is pictured overflowing

Woronara Dam, which supplies water to the Sutherland Shire in Sydney’s south, is pictured overflowing

Thirty suburbs are under threat of going underwater while 71 evacuation orders have been put in place.

More than 32,000 people across the state had already been urged to leave their homes while another 6,000 were told to be on alert.

There was major flooding at North Richmond, with river levels exceeding that reached in March (15.92 metres), with further rises possible, and major concern of escalating water levels at Sydney Basin, the Hawkesbury Nepean and Georges River.

Camden is among the worst places hit with the town submerged for the fourth time this year while parts of Lansvale, Chipping Norton and Moorebank have also gone under water.

Flood waters surround an industrial property in Londonderry on the outskirts of Sydney

Flood waters surround an industrial property in Londonderry on the outskirts of Sydney

Torrential rain is pictured on Harris Creek Bridge in New South Wales on July 4, 2022

Torrential rain is pictured on Harris Creek Bridge in New South Wales on July 4, 2022

A family is evacuated by State Emergency Service workers due to rising floodwaters in Bligh Park on July 4, 2022 in Sydney, Australia

A family is evacuated by State Emergency Service workers due to rising floodwaters in Bligh Park on July 4, 2022 in Sydney, Australia

The State Emergency Service has responded to 3,500 calls for help since the weekend, with 400 calls made overnight, and performed about 120 flood rescues, with that number expected to increase.

The Bureau of Meteorology is also investigating whether a tornado or waterspout damaged 40 homes in Bellambi and Corrimal, in the Illawarra region, on Sunday.

The Bureau of Meteorology has warned the rainfall is expected to continue to fall along the coast for the remainder of the week with more downpours coming throughout winter and possibly the spring.

BoM blamed the prolonged conditions on the combination of a possible negative Indian Ocean Dipole and positive Southern Annular Mode.

What has brought the rain and devastation back 'is the winds have turned easterly again, so they're coming in off the ocean once again'. Pictured is a weather map

What has brought the rain and devastation back ‘is the winds have turned easterly again, so they’re coming in off the ocean once again’. Pictured is a weather map

Police cars are pictured on Harris Creek Bridge in New South Wales July 4, 2022

Police cars are pictured on Harris Creek Bridge in New South Wales July 4, 2022

Federal emergency management minister Murray Watt said he expected the state government to formally declare the latest flooding a 'disaster' (pictured, graphic depicting flood warnings across NSW)

Federal emergency management minister Murray Watt said he expected the state government to formally declare the latest flooding a ‘disaster’ (pictured, graphic depicting flood warnings across NSW)

SES spokesman Ashley Sullivan says even if the rain eases this week, as predicted, rivers will continue to rise because the already saturated flood plains cannot absorb any water.

‘We are seeing these rivers rise much faster than what’s been predicted. Much faster than what we expected,’ he told the Nine Network on Monday.

‘Things are happening quicker. The risk … has increased significantly.’

Mr Watt said he expected the state government to formally declare the latest flooding a ‘disaster’.

‘We are expecting that will happen pretty soon and that will trigger a whole range of federal and state government support,’ he told ABC News Breakfast.

‘Everything from disaster payments to further counselling support. But as I say, I assure people that their pain is really felt at the federal and state levels and we will be standing with people as they seek to recover going forward.’

Cars drive through flood waters in Richmond on the outskirts of Sydney, Australia, Monday, July 4, 2022

Cars drive through flood waters in Richmond on the outskirts of Sydney, Australia, Monday, July 4, 2022

Pictured is flooding in the Chipping Norton, Nepean and Hawkesbury areas of New South Wales

Pictured is flooding in the Chipping Norton, Nepean and Hawkesbury areas of New South Wales

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