King Charles III makes historic first speech to the nation


King Charles III has paid tribute to his ‘darling Mama’ the Queen and vowed to ‘renew’ her ‘promise of a life of service’ as he delivered a deeply revealing and personal first address to the nation. 

The monarch, holding back tears, said, ‘To my darling Mama, thank you, thank you’, as he hailed Elizabeth II as an ‘inspiration and an example to me and to all my family’ following her death at Balmoral on Thursday aged 96. 

In a moving speech that was screened at a service of prayer and reflection at St Paul’s Cathedral, the King spoke of a ‘time of change for my family’ while praising his ‘darling wife Camilla’ who becomes Queen Consort ‘in recognition of her own loyal public service since our marriage 17 years ago’.  

Charles, 72, extended an olive branch to the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, saying he wished to ‘express my love for Harry and Meghan as they continue to build their lives overseas’.   

Charles III’s speech in full 

‘I speak to you today with feelings of profound sorrow. Throughout her life, Her Majesty The Queen – my beloved Mother – was an inspiration and example to me and to all my family, and we owe her the most heartfelt debt any family can owe to their mother; for her love, affection, guidance, understanding and example.

‘Queen Elizabeth was a life well lived; a promise with destiny kept and she is mourned most deeply in her passing. That promise of lifelong service I renew to you all today.

‘Alongside the personal grief that all my family are feeling, we also share with so many of you in the United Kingdom, in all the countries where The Queen was Head of State, in the Commonwealth and across the world, a deep sense of gratitude for the more than 70 years in which my Mother, as Queen, served the people of so many nations.

‘In 1947, on her 21st birthday, she pledged in a broadcast from Cape Town to the Commonwealth to devote her life, whether it be short or long, to the service of her peoples. That was more than a promise: it was a profound personal commitment which defined her whole life. She made sacrifices for duty.

‘Her dedication and devotion as Sovereign never waivered, through times of change and progress, through times of joy and celebration, and through times of sadness and loss.

‘In her life of service we saw that abiding love of tradition, together with that fearless embrace of progress, which make us great as Nations. The affection, admiration and respect she inspired became the hallmark of her reign.

‘And, as every member of my family can testify, she combined these qualities with warmth, humour and an unerring ability always to see the best in people.

‘I pay tribute to my Mother’s memory and I honour her life of service. I know that her death brings great sadness to so many of you and I share that sense of loss, beyond measure, with you all.

‘When The Queen came to the throne, Britain and the world were still coping with the privations and aftermath of the Second World War, and still living by the conventions of earlier times. In the course of the last 70 years we have seen our society become one of many cultures and many faiths.

‘The institutions of the State have changed in turn. But, through all changes and challenges, our nation and the wider family of Realms – of whose talents, traditions and achievements I am so inexpressibly proud – have prospered and flourished. Our values have remained, and must remain, constant.

‘The role and the duties of Monarchy also remain, as does the Sovereign’s particular relationship and responsibility towards the Church of England – the Church in which my own faith is so deeply rooted.

‘In that faith, and the values it inspires, I have been brought up to cherish a sense of duty to others, and to hold in the greatest respect the precious traditions, freedoms and responsibilities of our unique history and our system of parliamentary government.

‘As The Queen herself did with such unswerving devotion, I too now solemnly pledge myself, throughout the remaining time God grants me, to uphold the Constitutional principles at the heart of our nation.

‘And wherever you may live in the United Kingdom, or in the Realms and territories across the world, and whatever may be your background or beliefs, I shall endeavour to serve you with loyalty, respect and love, as I have throughout my life. My life will of course change as I take up my new responsibilities.

‘It will no longer be possible for me to give so much of my time and energies to the charities and issues for which I care so deeply. But I know this important work will go on in the trusted hands of others.

‘This is also a time of change for my family. I count on the loving help of my darling wife, Camilla. In recognition of her own loyal public service since our marriage 17 years ago, she becomes my Queen Consort.

‘I know she will bring to the demands of her new role the steadfast devotion to duty on which I have come to rely so much. As my Heir, William now assumes the Scottish titles which have meant so much to me.

‘He succeeds me as Duke of Cornwall and takes on the responsibilities for the Duchy of Cornwall which I have undertaken for more than five decades. Today, I am proud to create him Prince of Wales, Tywysog Cymru, the country whose title I have been so greatly privileged to bear during so much of my life and duty.

‘With Catherine beside him, our new Prince and Princess of Wales will, I know, continue to inspire and lead our national conversations, helping to bring the marginal to the centre ground where vital help can be given. I want also to express my love for Harry and Meghan as they continue to build their lives overseas.

‘In a little over a week’s time we will come together as a nation, as a Commonwealth and indeed a global community, to lay my beloved mother to rest. In our sorrow, let us remember and draw strength from the light of her example.

‘On behalf of all my family, I can only offer the most sincere and heartfelt thanks for your condolences and support. They mean more to me than I can ever possibly express.

‘And to my darling Mama, as you begin your last great journey to join my dear late Papa, I want simply to say this: thank you.

‘Thank you for your love and devotion to our family and to the family of nations you have served so diligently all these years. May ‘flights of Angels sing thee to thy rest’.’

 

The King also used his speech to announce that he had created his son William the Prince of Wales, with Kate the Princess of Wales – a role last held by Diana. 

Last night, a royal source said: ‘The new Princess of Wales appreciates the history associated with this role but will understandably want to look to the future as she creates her own path.’ 

In his speech, the King said of his ‘beloved mother’ the late Elizabeth II: ‘We owe her the most heartfelt debt any family can owe to their mother; for her love, affection, guidance, understanding and example’.

He added: ‘To my darling Mama, as you begin your last great journey to join my dear late Papa, I want simply to say this: thank you. 

‘Thank you for your love and devotion to our family and to the family of nations you have served so diligently all these years. May ‘flights of Angels sing thee to thy rest’.’

The King pledged to dedicate his whole life to serving the nation just as the Queen did at her accession, saying: ‘That promise of lifelong service I renew to you all today’.  

The monarch pre-recorded the lengthy speech, which was just under 1,000 words and lasted around nine-and-a-half minutes in the Blue Drawing Room of the royal residence in central London, and it was played out at 6pm on Friday.

The King, dressed in a sombre black suit, black tie and with a black and white checked handkerchief in his breast pocket, said: ‘I speak to you today with feelings of profound sorrow.

‘Throughout her life, Her Majesty The Queen – my beloved Mother – was an inspiration and example to me and to all my family, and we owe her the most heartfelt debt any family can owe to their mother; for her love, affection, guidance, understanding and example.

‘Queen Elizabeth was a life well lived; a promise with destiny kept and she is mourned most deeply in her passing. That promise of lifelong service I renew to you all today.’ 

Charles confirmed he will have to take a step back from his considerable charitable interests now he is king and ‘issues’ he has campaigned for – likely to be interpreted as an end to his lobbying of ministers with his famous ‘black spider memos’.

He said: ‘My life will of course change as I take up my new responsibilities. It will no longer be possible for me to give so much of my time and energies to the charities and issues for which I care so deeply. But I know this important work will go on in the trusted hands of others.

‘This is also a time of change for my family. I count on the loving help of my darling wife, Camilla. In recognition of her own loyal public service since our marriage seventeen years ago, she becomes my Queen Consort.

‘I know she will bring to the demands of her new role the steadfast devotion to duty on which I have come to rely so much.’

MPs applauded the King’s address after they watched it in silence in the Commons chamber. Some could be seen wiping away tears during the speech. 

The Commons had been suspended for a short period to allow MPs to watch the speech on televisions in the chamber.

This evening’s service at St Paul’s is being attended by 2,000 members of the public who were handed tickets on a first-come-first-served basis.   

Members of the congregation were tearful through the service as the choir sang. One woman was seen using a handkerchief to wipe her eyes as she sat in the pews at St Paul’s, as a piper played Flowers of the Forest – a lament played only at funerals and memorials. 

Prime Minister Liz Truss looked solemn as she gave her Bible reading from Romans 14. 7-12.

She said: ‘We do not live to ourselves, and we do not die to ourselves. If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord; so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s.

‘For to this end Christ died and lived again, so that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living.

‘Why do you pass judgement on your brother or sister? Or you, why do you despise your brother or sister? For we will all stand before the judgement seat of God.

‘For it is written, ‘As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me, and every tongue shall give praise to God.’ So then, each of us will be accountable to God.’

London Mayor Sadiq Khan, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer, Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng and Foreign Secretary James Cleverly were seen listening intently to her reading before standing for the hymn O Thou Who Camest From Above.

In a separate area, the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Lord Speaker are sat together while Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster Nadhim Zahawi is sat with Lord High Chancellor Brandon Lewis.  

Deputy Prime Minister Therese Coffey, Leader of the Commons Penny Mordaunt and Welsh Secretary Robert Buckland were seen all standing together and singing along to a hymn during the service. 

Earlier today, huge crowds cheered the new monarch as he arrived at Buckingham Palace in a vintage Rolls-Royce alongside Camilla, the Queen Consort, before he got out and began shaking hands with countless well-wishers.  

In moving scenes, shouts of God Save the King broke out before an impromptu rendition of the National Anthem, with the words changed to reflect the new monarch. 

As the sun shone on an otherwise dull, damp day, the Royal Standard was raised above Buckingham Palace for the first time of his reign.

King Charles III, holding back tears, said, ‘To my darling Mama, thank you, thank you’, as he hailed Elizabeth II as an ‘inspiration and an example to me and to all my family’ following her death aged 96 at Balmoral Castle yesterday 

During his speech, Charles was sat at an antique polished desk in Buckingham Palace's Blue Drawing Room, one of the grand state rooms, where the Queen would sometimes film her Christmas broadcasts. To the King's left was a framed photograph of his late mother the Queen, smiling broadly and wearing a vivid blue coat and matching hat decorated with a red flower

During his speech, Charles was sat at an antique polished desk in Buckingham Palace’s Blue Drawing Room, one of the grand state rooms, where the Queen would sometimes film her Christmas broadcasts. To the King’s left was a framed photograph of his late mother the Queen, smiling broadly and wearing a vivid blue coat and matching hat decorated with a red flower 

Prime Minister Liz Truss looked solemn as she gave her Bible reading from Romans 14. 7-12 at this evening's service

Prime Minister Liz Truss looked solemn as she gave her Bible reading from Romans 14. 7-12 at this evening’s service  

Ms Truss said: 'We do not live to ourselves, and we do not die to ourselves. If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord; so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord's'

Ms Truss said: ‘We do not live to ourselves, and we do not die to ourselves. If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord; so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s’

Last night's service at St Paul's is being attended by 2,000 members of the public who were handed tickets on a first-come-first-served basis

Last night’s service at St Paul’s is being attended by 2,000 members of the public who were handed tickets on a first-come-first-served basis

Members of the congregation were tearful through the service as the choir sang. One woman was seen using a handkerchief to wipe her eyes as she sat in the pews at St Paul's

Members of the congregation were tearful through the service as the choir sang. One woman was seen using a handkerchief to wipe her eyes as she sat in the pews at St Paul’s

Hymns at the service included All My Hope On God Is Founded, O Thou Who Camest From Above, and The Lord's My Shepherd (pictured are members of the congregation)

Hymns at the service included All My Hope On God Is Founded, O Thou Who Camest From Above, and The Lord’s My Shepherd (pictured are members of the congregation) 

People bow their heads in prayer during last night's service of prayer and reflection at St Paul's Cathedral

People bow their heads in prayer during last night’s service of prayer and reflection at St Paul’s Cathedral 

There was a solemn mood inside St Paul's Cathedral yesterday. Unusually for a major royal event, it was attended overwhelmingly by members of the public rather than royal dignitaries and invited guests

There was a solemn mood inside St Paul’s Cathedral yesterday. Unusually for a major royal event, it was attended overwhelmingly by members of the public rather than royal dignitaries and invited guests 

A piper plays Flowers of the Forest - a lament played only at funerals and memorials - during the Service of Prayer and Reflection at St Paul's Cathedral

A piper plays Flowers of the Forest – a lament played only at funerals and memorials – during the Service of Prayer and Reflection at St Paul’s Cathedral

Members of the public attend a service of Prayer and Reflection, following the Queen's death in Balmoral on Thursday

Members of the public attend a service of Prayer and Reflection, following the Queen’s death in Balmoral on Thursday

Portraits of the Queen were set up inside St Paul's Cathedral for this evening's service in Sir Christopher Wren's iconic building

Portraits of the Queen were set up inside St Paul’s Cathedral for this evening’s service in Sir Christopher Wren’s iconic building 

Drinkers in the Prince of Wales pub in central London watch King Charles III's speech from the Blue Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace

Drinkers in the Prince of Wales pub in central London watch King Charles III’s speech from the Blue Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace

Members of the public in The Prince Harry Pub, Windsor, watching a broadcast of King Charles III's first address to Britain

Members of the public in The Prince Harry Pub, Windsor, watching a broadcast of King Charles III’s first address to Britain 

Customers of the Old Coffee House Pub in Ruislip turn round to face a television to watch Charles' speech

Customers of the Old Coffee House Pub in Ruislip turn round to face a television to watch Charles’ speech 

Members of the public wait opposite St Paul's Cathedral, ahead of this evening's service to remember the life of the late Queen

Members of the public wait opposite St Paul’s Cathedral, ahead of this evening’s service to remember the life of the late Queen 

Charles with his mother the Queen on September 2, 2017 at the annual Braemar Gathering in Braemar, central Scotland

Charles with his mother the Queen on September 2, 2017 at the annual Braemar Gathering in Braemar, central Scotland

King Charles III during his first in-person audience with Prime Minister Liz Truss at Buckingham Palace yesterday

King Charles III during his first in-person audience with Prime Minister Liz Truss at Buckingham Palace yesterday 

At Buckingham Palace this yesterday, onlookers shouted three cheers for Charles at Buckingham Palace as one woman leaned over to kiss him on the hand and another asked ‘Can I kiss you?’ before pecking him on the cheek.  

The King’s historic Accession Council will be held on Saturday at 10am in St James’s Palace. It will be televised for the first time in its history, showing the King being formally proclaimed monarch and Charles making his declaration and oath.

Rosemary for remembrance and Queen’s corgi vase feature in King’s address  

Touching tributes to the Queen – from a vase decorated with corgis to rosemary for remembrance – featured in the King’s historic address to the nation.

Charles was sat at an antique polished desk in Buckingham Palace’s Blue Drawing Room, one of the grand state rooms, where the Queen would sometimes film her Christmas broadcasts.

To the King’s left was a framed photograph of his late mother the Queen, smiling broadly and wearing a vivid blue coat and matching hat decorated with a red flower.

And on the right, delicate white sweet peas set with sprigs of rosemary – the herb a traditional symbol of remembrance – were placed in memory of Elizabeth II.

The posy stood in a small silver vase – at the base of which were several small silver playful-looking corgis.

The ornament was used by the Queen when she used to sit at the very same desk.

It was a touching nod to the monarch’s love of her favourite dogs, who were a constant source of happiness during her long reign.

The Blue Drawing Room, designed by John Nash, is decorated with pairs of scagliola columns, painted to resemble onyx in 1860.

There are five cut-glass chandeliers, an assortment of settees, chairs and tables, and it is often used for royal receptions.

 

A Principal Proclamation will be read in public for the first time by the Garter King of Arms in the open air from the balcony overlooking Friary Court at St James’s an hour later at 11am.

It will be followed by a flurry of proclamations around the country, with the second one in the City of London at the Royal Exchange at midday on Saturday, and further proclamations in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales at midday on Sunday. 

At Buckingham Palace this afternoon, onlookers held out red roses for the King as the Queen Consort followed behind at a distance before joining her husband at his side to view the floral tributes left outside the gates.

The King was heard telling well-wishers, ‘Thank you so much, it’s so kind, it really is’, ‘God bless you’ and ‘I’ve really dreaded this day’ during the 15-minute walkabout. 

One woman shouted to him, ‘We love you King Charles and we loved your mum’. 

As a bugle sounded, Charles, dressed in mourning black suit and tie, walked side by side with Camilla – who seemed close to tears – through the main entrance of Buckingham Palace.

Film director Raynald Leconte, 47, who is from New York, said he was lucky enough to speak to the King and Queen Consort outside Buckingham Palace.

‘It was quite a moment,’ he said. ‘I said, ‘condolences’. He said, ”really, really thank you very much”. And to his wife I wished her good luck and she said, ”thank you very much”. I think she said, ”I’ll need it”.’

Mother of three Stella Johnson said: ‘I think he will be wonderful, and I just wanted to come here to see him. This is really a historic moment and I wanted to make sure I did not miss it.’

Further back in the crowd, a former Guardsman, who asked not to be named, gave the crowd a running commentary as he was tall enough to see over the crowds and pick out Charles as he met mourners.

He also talked them through the protocol of the Guards who had assembled in the Palace forecourt to salute the new King as he made his way into the Palace. 

One of the first to offer words of support to the new King was Laura Ohmona. She said after shaking hands with Charles: ‘I said to him ‘sorry for your loss’ and he said ‘thank-you’.’

Earlier, huge crowds cheered Charles and Camilla as they arrived at the palace before the King left his car. Several people kissed his hand as he passed

Earlier, huge crowds cheered Charles and Camilla as they arrived at the palace before the King left his car. Several people kissed his hand as he passed 

Onlookers shouted three cheers for Charles as he spoke to countless onlookers who had gathered to mourn his mother

Onlookers shouted three cheers for Charles as he spoke to countless onlookers who had gathered to mourn his mother 

Cheers rang out at Buckingham Palace as the King and Queen Consort arrived, along with shouts of 'God save the King'

Cheers rang out at Buckingham Palace as the King and Queen Consort arrived, along with shouts of ‘God save the King’ 

Many in the crowd were visibly emotional, while others held their phones aloft to try to catch at glimpse of the King

Many in the crowd were visibly emotional, while others held their phones aloft to try to catch at glimpse of the King 

It was the new King's first walkabout and encounter with the public since his historic accession and crowds lined up behind a barrier clamouring to greet him

It was the new King’s first walkabout and encounter with the public since his historic accession and crowds lined up behind a barrier clamouring to greet him

A visibly emotional Charles pauses to look at floral tributes to his mother that have been left outside the gates of Buckingham Palace

A visibly emotional Charles pauses to look at floral tributes to his mother that have been left outside the gates of Buckingham Palace 

Charles embraces Camilla as they look at the floral tributes before making their way through the palace's main gates

Charles embraces Camilla as they look at the floral tributes before making their way through the palace’s main gates 

The new king thanked people for their good wishes, shaking countless hands after stepping from his state Bentley

The new king thanked people for their good wishes, shaking countless hands after stepping from his state Bentley

Shouts of God Save the King went up, along with three cheers, for the new head of state, dressed in mourning black suit and tie, who smiled and waved at the mass of people

Shouts of God Save the King went up, along with three cheers, for the new head of state, dressed in mourning black suit and tie, who smiled and waved at the mass of people

The King waves to crowds outside Buckingham Palace, where he arrived with Camilla after they travelled from Balmoral

The King waves to crowds outside Buckingham Palace, where he arrived with Camilla after they travelled from Balmoral 

Elizabeth II, Charles' mother and an icon instantly recognisable to billions of people around the world, died at her Scottish Highland retreat yesterday

Elizabeth II, Charles’ mother and an icon instantly recognisable to billions of people around the world, died at her Scottish Highland retreat yesterday 

Charles - pictured with Camilla - met Prime Minister Liz Truss today before his speech to the nation

Charles – pictured with Camilla – met Prime Minister Liz Truss today before his speech to the nation 

The King must turn to his duties as monarch despite his grief, and has held his first in-person audience with Prime Minister Liz Truss at Buckingham Palace

The King must turn to his duties as monarch despite his grief, and has held his first in-person audience with Prime Minister Liz Truss at Buckingham Palace

The King and Queen Consort view the flowers and messages left by members of the public outside Buckingham Palace this afternoon

The King and Queen Consort view the flowers and messages left by members of the public outside Buckingham Palace this afternoon 

The Queen Consort joined the King at his side to view the hundreds of floral tributes, notes and Union flags left outside the gates

The Queen Consort joined the King at his side to view the hundreds of floral tributes, notes and Union flags left outside the gates

The new King gives a final wave as he and his wife walk into Buckingham Palace under the watchful eye of armed policemen 

As a bugler sounded, the couple - both dressed in black - walked side by side through the main entrance of Buckingham Palac

As a bugler sounded, the couple – both dressed in black – walked side by side through the main entrance of Buckingham Palace

King Charles III and the Queen Consort drive down the Mall followed by several 4x4s before they got out at the gates of Buckingham Palace

King Charles III and the Queen Consort drive down the Mall followed by several 4x4s before they got out at the gates of Buckingham Palace 

Huge crowds cheered the couple as they arrived at the palace before the King left his car and began shaking hands with members of the public

Huge crowds cheered the couple as they arrived at the palace before the King left his car and began shaking hands with members of the public

Huge crowds cheered the couple as they arrived at the palace in a state Rolls-Royce, with the King visibly emotional

Huge crowds cheered the couple as they arrived at the palace in a state Rolls-Royce, with the King visibly emotional 

Kate Middleton becomes the first Princess of Wales since Diana: Charles announces his daughter-in-law’s new title during his first address as King 

Kate Middleton will be known as the Princess of Wales, King Charles III confirmed tonight.

Kate, formerly known as the Duchess of Cambridge, will now hold the titles of the Duchess of Cornwall and the Princess of Wales – the first member of the Royal Family to hold the title since Princess Diana.

However a source said the new Princess of Wales ‘appreciates the history associated with this role but will understandably want to look to the future as she creates her own path’.

In his first televised address to the nation since the death of the Queen yesterday, King Charles III confirmed his son Prince William would inherit his title of the Prince of Wales and his wife Kate would become Princess.

The King said: ‘Today, I am proud to create [William] Prince of Wales, Tywysog Cymru, the country whose title I have been so greatly privileged to bear during so much of my life and duty.

‘With Catherine beside him, our new Prince and Princess of Wales will, I know, continue to inspire and lead our national conversations, helping to bring the marginal to the centre ground where vital help can be given.’

Since the 14th century the title of the Princess of Wales has been used by the wives of the Princes of Wales. However, it is a courtesy title.

A royal source told MailOnline: ‘The couple are focussed on deepening the trust and respect of the people of Wales over time.

‘The Prince and Princess of Wales will approach their roles in the modest and humble way they’ve approached their work previously.

‘The new Princess of Wales appreciates the history associated with this role but will understandably want to look to the future as she creates her own path.’  

Also among the crowds at Buckingham Palace was retired Ammar Al-Baldawi, 64, from Hertfordshire, who said: ‘It was impressive, touching, a good move to come out to the crowds.

‘I think that’s where the royal family needs to communicate with the people now. These are true loyalists here and it’s nice to see him back in post, taking charge of the family and the Crown, which is reassuring.’ 

Colin Hennessy, 52, said: ‘It’s great to see the King. You can see he’s very emotional but he was very grateful to everybody here. He thanked as many people as he could as he walked by.’ 

Joyce Curtis, 72, from Jersey, said: ‘I just wanted to be here. It was great. I have respect for him. He walked all the way along to see the people and back to see the flowers. It is what the people wanted to see, which is great.’ 

Emma Spreckley, 43, had travelled to Buckingham Palace with her friend Jacqueline Southwick, 55, from their homes in Mitcham, south London.

She was sympathetic to the grieving King: ‘He looked a bit shocked, I suppose he is as it’s your mum at the end of the day, and now he’s here shaking people’s hands and trying to, I suppose, get through it as best he can.’

In reference to the thousands who were at the palace to pay their respects to the late Queen, Ms Southwick added ‘Seeing all this – he’s got the support of the nation.’ 

Meanwhile, John Hardy said he was confident Charles would be a calming influence on the country when he is finally crowned King.

‘It does seem that he has been around for such a long time that we’ve all known him. No one will ever replace the Queen and the affection she has held for everyone in this country.

‘But I think Charles has a lot of respect and people will support him.’      

The couple had landed at RAF Northolt just after 1.30pm after leaving Balmoral, where they had stayed overnight after racing up to be at the late Queen’s bedside. 

Charles has already turned his hand to his duties as monarch despite his grief. He gave the order that a period of ‘Royal Mourning’ for the Queen will be observed from now until seven days after her funeral.

Royal Mourning will be observed by members of the royal family, royal household staff and representatives of the royal Household on official duties, together with troops committed to ceremonial duties.

The Duke of Cornwall and Cambridge is also travelling back to Windsor to be with his family ahead of the Accession Council, which William will attend.

Charles and Camilla - now King and Queen Consort - wave to members of the public as they arrive at Buckingham Palace in a Rolls-Royce

Charles and Camilla – now King and Queen Consort – wave to members of the public as they arrive at Buckingham Palace in a Rolls-Royce 

Camilla had joined Charles on the poignant journey from Balmoral, where the Queen died peacefully on Thursday at the age of 96, arriving at RAF Northolt in west London at around 1.35pm

Camilla had joined Charles on the poignant journey from Balmoral, where the Queen died peacefully on Thursday at the age of 96, arriving at RAF Northolt in west London at around 1.35pm

Tributes continue to be paid to the woman described by the Prime Minister as the "rock on which modern Britain was built", with the Dalai Lama expressing his "deep sadness" over the death of the Queen in a letter to the King

Tributes continue to be paid to the woman described by the Prime Minister as the ‘rock on which modern Britain was built’, with the Dalai Lama expressing his ‘deep sadness’ over the death of the Queen in a letter to the King

Charles and Camilla wave to crowds outside Buckingham Palace. The bollard in the background bears his mother's cypher

Charles and Camilla wave to crowds outside Buckingham Palace. The bollard in the background bears his mother’s cypher 

Charles - wearing a black mourning suit - joins his wife to inspect the flowers and Union flags laid outside the palace

Charles – wearing a black mourning suit – joins his wife to inspect the flowers and Union flags laid outside the palace 

Charles spent about 15 minutes greeting members of the public before joining his wife as they walked through the palace gates

Charles spent about 15 minutes greeting members of the public before joining his wife as they walked through the palace gates 

The new King places his arm around Camilla as they walk pass photographers towards the gates of the palace

The new King places his arm around Camilla as they walk pass photographers towards the gates of the palace

The new King places his arm around Camilla as they walk pass photographers towards the gates of the palace 

In a touching moment Charles put his hand around his wife who was visibly moved after meeting the well-wishers before the began to look at the letters, cards, bouquets and candles left in memory of the Queen.

In a touching moment Charles put his hand around his wife who was visibly moved after meeting the well-wishers before the began to look at the letters, cards, bouquets and candles left in memory of the Queen.

A sentry stands guard by Buckingham Palace, where the Royal Standard had been hoisted for the first time in Charles' reign

A sentry stands guard by Buckingham Palace, where the Royal Standard had been hoisted for the first time in Charles’ reign 

The King must turn to his duties as monarch despite his grief, as he prepares to hold his first audience with Prime Minister Liz Truss ahead of delivering a televised address to a nation in mourning at 6pm on Friday

The King must turn to his duties as monarch despite his grief, as he prepares to hold his first audience with Prime Minister Liz Truss ahead of delivering a televised address to a nation in mourning at 6pm on Friday

Charles says he wants ‘to express my love for Harry and Meghan’

King Charles III extended an olive branch to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in his first address to Britain and the world as monarch.

The new Sovereign, who became King the moment that his mother Queen Elizabeth II passed away yesterday afternoon at Balmoral Castle aged 96, said he wished to ‘express my love for Harry and Meghan as they continue to build their lives overseas’ – in a move likely to be regarded by royal commentators as a bid to finally draw a line under the tumult of recent years.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex plunged the monarchy into crisis during the twilight years of the Queen’s reign after sensationally quitting frontline royal duties and moving to California two years ago – a saga which precipitated the rift between Harry and his brother William, allegations of racism against the royals and claims the Firm failed to help a suicidal Meghan. 

Today, tributes continued to be paid to the woman described by the Prime Minister as the ‘rock on which modern Britain was built’, with the Dalai Lama expressing his ‘deep sadness’ over the death of the Queen in a letter to the King.

He told Charles: ‘Your mother lived a meaningful life with dignity, grace, a strong sense of service and a warm heart, qualities we all should treasure.’

Thousands of people have flocked the Queen’s former homes of Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and Balmoral to pay their respects, leaving hundreds of bouquets, personal notes and candles in her honour.

Charles has already turned his hand to his duties

He gave the order that a period of ‘Royal Mourning’ for the Queen will be observed from now until seven days after her funeral.

Royal Mourning will be observed by members of the royal family, royal household staff and representatives of the royal household on official duties, together with troops committed to ceremonial duties.

Royal salutes were fired with one round for every year of the Queen’s life on Friday at 1pm in Hyde Park by the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery.

Thousands of people stood in solemn silence for 16 minutes as the cannons boomed once every 10 seconds, sending smoke across the grounds with each round, applauding as the spectacle came to an end.

The PM and senior ministers will attend a public service of remembrance at St Paul’s Cathedral in central London this evening.

King Charles III and Camilla, the Queen Consort, arrive at RAF Northolt in London this afternoon

King Charles III and Camilla, the Queen Consort, arrive at RAF Northolt in London this afternoon 

Charles is welcomed by Station Commander Group Captain McPhaden after he and Camilla touched down at the RAF airbase

Charles is welcomed by Station Commander Group Captain McPhaden after he and Camilla touched down at the RAF airbase 

The couple left the airport in a vintage Rolls-Royce for the journey to Buckingham Palace where thousands of people had gathered to greet them

The couple left the airport in a vintage Rolls-Royce for the journey to Buckingham Palace where thousands of people had gathered to greet them 

An emotional King Charles III leaving Balmoral on his way to Aberdeen Airport on the first leg of his journey to London

An emotional King Charles III leaving Balmoral on his way to Aberdeen Airport on the first leg of his journey to London 

Queen Consort Camilla also appeared to have teary eyes as she sat in the front seat en route to Aberdeen Airport

Queen Consort Camilla also appeared to have teary eyes as she sat in the front seat en route to Aberdeen Airport 

King Charles III arrives at Aberdeen Airport after leaving Balmoral, following the death of his mother last night

The monarch shook hands at the airport before boarding a flight to London, where he will address the nation this evening

King Charles III at Aberdeen Airport as he travels to London with the Queen Consort following the death of his mother

King Charles III at Aberdeen Airport as he travels to London with the Queen Consort following the death of his mother

A vehicle carrying Britain's King Charles leaves Balmoral Castle, following the passing of Britain's Queen Elizabeth

A vehicle carrying Britain’s King Charles leaves Balmoral Castle, following the passing of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth

King Charles III and the Queen Consort leave Birkhall in Scotland as they travel to London following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

King Charles III and the Queen Consort leave Birkhall in Scotland as they travel to London following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

The King (pictured looking emotional on his way out of Balmoral this morning) has also instructed a period of royal mourning from now until seven days after his mother's funeral - a date yet to be confirmed

The King (pictured looking emotional on his way out of Balmoral this morning) has also instructed a period of royal mourning from now until seven days after his mother’s funeral – a date yet to be confirmed

King Charles III and the Queen arrive at Aberdeen Airport as they travel to London following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

King Charles III and the Queen arrive at Aberdeen Airport as they travel to London following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

Handout issued by Buckingham Palace of the notice for the Accession Council and Principal Proclamation of King Charles III

Handout issued by Buckingham Palace of the notice for the Accession Council and Principal Proclamation of King Charles III

Charles has released a statement about the death of Queen Elizabeth, describing her as a 'cherished Sovereign and a much-loved Mother'

Charles has released a statement about the death of Queen Elizabeth, describing her as a ‘cherished Sovereign and a much-loved Mother’

King Charles III pays tribute to his ‘darling’ Camilla as he confirms her title as Queen Consort and says he will ‘count on her loving help’ during this ‘time of change’ 

The new King Charles III and Queen Consort Camilla arrive at Buckingham Palace today, a day after the death of Queen Elizabeth II

The new King Charles III and Queen Consort Camilla arrive at Buckingham Palace today, a day after the death of Queen Elizabeth II

By Maria Chiorando for MailOnline  

King Charles III has addressed the nation in his first speech since becoming the monarch, paying tribute to his ‘darling’ wife Camilla and her ‘loyal public service’ – as well as confirming her title of Queen Consort.

He ascends the throne following the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, at Balmoral, yesterday, aged 96.

During the emotional address, which was broadcast from Buckingham Palace, the new King, 73, said he will be counting on ‘the loving help of [his] darling wife, Camilla’.

In the speech that was screened at a service of prayer and reflection at St Paul’s Cathedral, he spoke of the ‘time of change’ for his family, adding: ‘I count on the loving help of my darling wife, Camilla.

‘In recognition of her own loyal public service since our marriage 17 years ago, she becomes my Queen Consort.

‘I know she will bring to the demands of her new role the steadfast devotion to duty on which I have come to rely so much.’

He had begun his address by telling the nation: ‘I speak to you today with feelings of profound sorrow.

‘Throughout her life, Her Majesty The Queen – my beloved Mother – was an inspiration and example to me and to all my family, and we owe her the most heartfelt debt any family can owe to their mother; for her love, affection, guidance, understanding and example.

‘As the Queen herself did with such unswerving devotion, I too now solemnly pledge myself, throughout the remaining time God grants me, to uphold the Constitutional principles at the heart of our nation.’  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk