Karl Stefanovic SLAMS ‘woke brigade’ trying to ban ham sandwiches at Australian schools


Karl Stefanovic SLAMS ‘woke brigade’ trying to ban ham sandwiches at Australian schools: ‘Hands off our ham!’

  • Children told to stop eating ham sandwiches in ridiculous ‘warning’ note
  • The note was put into public school newsletters by teachers in NSW
  • Both parents and pork producers have defended the lunchbox favourite
  • Karl Stefanovic weighed in and says it’s an attack on the ‘national consciousness’

Karl Stefanovic has hit out at the ‘woke brigade’ who are trying to stop parents giving their kids ham sandwiches, calling it ‘un-Australian’.

His comments come after leaflets from the Cancer Council were sent out by teachers at NSW schools telling kids to stop eating ham sandwiches because processed meat is linked to an increased risk of cancer. 

The ‘healthy eating leaflets’ have prompted a furious backlash from parents, who say they’re sick of the ‘nanny state’ telling them what to feed their kids.

Stefanovic also hit back against the Cancer Council’s health advice on Tuesday morning, declaring ‘hands off our ham’.

Leaflets telling kids to stop eating ham sandwiches have been put into public school newsletters by teachers. Pictured: A young boy eating a ham sandwich

‘I think this is just ridiculous,’ Stefanovic explained. ‘I don’t know where they get off doing this.’

Poll

Would you put ham in your child’s lunchbox?

  • Yes 3479 votes
  • No 408 votes

He said it should be up to children to decide whether they eat ham sandwiches.

‘I don’t know what I would do without having a ham and cheese sandwich after a hangover on a Saturday morning,’ he said.

‘This is an attack on the national consciousness more than anything else.

He spoke with butcher David Bligh, owner of Bringelly Pork & Bacon in Sydney, and asked him what he thought about the ‘woke brigade’ coming for ham sandwiches.

‘There’s many people who bring up all sorts of issues about food and chemicals and things like that,’ Mr Bligh explained. 

‘But a lot of the preservatives and things that are put in ham and bacon are actually naturally occurring and also found in vegetables.’

However a Cancer Council spokeswoman defended the leaflets and says they are part of a health campaign to get children eating better food. 

Today Show host Karl Stefanovic has hit back at the leaflets and says it's an attack on the national consciousness

Today Show host Karl Stefanovic has hit back at the leaflets and says it’s an attack on the national consciousness

Cancer Council leaflets (pictured) encouraging children to 'ditch the ham sandwich' have been included in public school newsletters

Cancer Council leaflets (pictured) encouraging children to ‘ditch the ham sandwich’ have been included in public school newsletters

CANCER COUNCIL’S UNHEALTHY SNACKS AND ALTERNATIVES 

Snack: juice or cordial. Alternative: milk or water

Snack: cheese spread. Alternative: vegie sticks and hummus, wholegrain crispbread with cheese and vegemite or a cheese and tomato sandwich

Snack: dessert tubs. Alternative: yoghurt, berry smoothie or apple pie with oats.

Snack: muffins. Alternative: fruit loaf, banana pikelets or apple and date muffins

Snack: chocolate. Alternative: homemade bliss balls, flap jacks or reduced fat custard

Snack: sweet biscuits. Alternative: raisin toast, mixed berry scones, carrot cake oat biscuits

Snack: muesli bars. Alternative: homemade muesli bars, zucchini, broccoli and cheese hashbrown cups or fruit English muffins

Snack: lollies. Alternative: dried fruit, celery with cream cheese and sultanas or healthy apple crumble

Snack: savoury biscuits. Alternative: baked pita bread with roast vegetable dip, vegetable muffins or wholemeal crackers with hummus

Snack: roll ups. Alternative: canned fruit in natural juice, fruit and yoghurt or fruit salad

Snack: cake. Alternative: banana bread, pumpkin and sweet potato scones or fruit loaf

Snack: chips. Alternative: popcorn, roasted chickpeas or plain rice crackers

Source: Cancer Council 

‘Because there is strong evidence that eating processed meats and too much red meat is associated with increased risk of bowel cancer, our cancer prevention messages advise everyone to limit their processed meat consumption and cut down on red meat,’ she said.

Parents have also been told to avoid adding muesli bars, and savoury biscuits to their children’s school lunch boxes by the organisation.

Instead of a muesli bar, the Cancer Council suggested parents whip up a homemade version, or some zucchini, broccoli and cheese hashbrown cups. 

Alternative options for a slice of cake included fruit loaf and pumpkin and sweet potato scones. 

For fruit juice, milk or water was suggested instead, and for a bag of biscuits, parents were encouraged to consider giving their kids pita bread and roast vegetable dip, or vegetable muffins. 

Popcorn and roasted chickpeas were other options parents were told to consider over a packet of chips. 

Cancer Council recommendations on processed meats 

Eating more than 700 grams (raw weight) of red meat a week increases your risk of bowel cancer? Or that the risk of developing bowel cancer goes up 1.18 times for every 50 grams of processed meat eaten per day?

The World Health Organization has classified processed meats including ham, bacon, salami and frankfurts as a Group 1 carcinogen (known to cause cancer) which means that there’s strong evidence that processed meats cause cancer. Eating processed meat increases your risk of bowel and stomach cancer. Red meat, such as beef, lamb and pork, has been classified as a Group 2A carcinogen which means it probably causes cancer.

Current research shows that there are certain chemicals in red and processed meats – both added and naturally occurring – that cause these foods to be carcinogenic. For example, when a chemical in red meat called haem is broken down in the gut, N-nitroso chemicals are formed and these have been found to damage the cells that line the bowel, which can lead to bowel cancer. These same chemicals also form when processed meat is digested. In addition, the nitrite and nitrate preservatives used to preserve processed meat produce these N-nitroso chemicals and can lead to bowel cancer.

To reduce your risk of cancer, Cancer Council recommends eating no more than 1 serve of lean red meat per day or 2 serves 3-4 times per week. Red meat includes beef, lamb and pork.

Cut out processed meats altogether or keep them to an absolute minimum. Processed meats include bacon, ham, devon, frankfurts, chorizo, cabanossi and kransky.

The humble ham sandwich (pictured) has long been a school kids' lunchbox favourite

The humble ham sandwich (pictured) has long been a school kids’ lunchbox favourite 

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk