Karaoke: Free Sky Q, Fire TV, Android TV and Google TV app lets you sing along to 140,000 tracks


If karaoke has you belting out ‘Thank You for the Music’, good news — ROXi has today released an app that lets you sing along to 140,000 tracks for free.

The new ‘TV Music App’, which also comes with 70 million regular songs, will be launching initially on Android TV, Fire TV, Google TV and Samsung TV.

And in what one might call a ‘mike drop’, the firm is giving away more than a million ROXi Karaoke Microphones — each worth £29.99 — to new ROXi Premium users. 

ROXi — whose music service is said to have boomed during lockdown — is aiming to do for music on TV what apps like Netflix and Disney+ have done for streamed video.

Launched in 2017 by British entrepreneur Rob Lewis, ROXi is backed by a number of high-name musicians, including Sheryl Crow, Kylie Minogue and Robbie Williams. 

If karaoke has you belting out ‘Thank You for the Music’, good news — ROXi has today released an app (pictured) that lets you sing along to 140,000 tracks for free.

The new 'TV Music App', which also comes with 70 million regular songs, will be launching initially on Android TV, Fire TV, Google TV and Samsung TV. Pictured: the app interface

The new ‘TV Music App’, which also comes with 70 million regular songs, will be launching initially on Android TV, Fire TV, Google TV and Samsung TV. Pictured: the app interface

Launched in 2017 by British entrepreneur Rob Lewis, ROXi is backed by a number of high-name musicians, including Kylie Minogue, pictured

Launched in 2017 by British entrepreneur Rob Lewis, ROXi is backed by a number of high-name musicians, including Robbie Williams, pictured

Launched in 2017 by British entrepreneur Rob Lewis, ROXi is backed by a number of high-name musicians, including Sheryl Crow, Kylie Minogue (left) and Robbie Williams (right) 

ROXi’S APP WILL COME ON THESE PLATFORMS

ROXI’s ‘TV Music App’ — which will come with 140,000 karaoke tracks and 70 million regular songs — will be launching initially on Android TV, Fire TV and Google TV on compatible smart tv sets and set-top boxes from the following brands:

  • HiSense 
  • Panasonic
  • Philips
  • Shield 
  • Sony Bravia
  • Toshiba TCL

According to the firm, Samsung TVs and other platforms will follow.

ROXi is also available on older, non-smart TVs through the ROXi Console. 

‘TV is the heart of home entertainment and now is the time for music to join film in this Smart TV App revolution,’ said Mr Lewis, who previously launched the mobile music streaming service MusicStation back in 2007

‘We’re bringing music videos, karaoke and games into people’s homes through a TV Music App for free — so millions of households can enjoy music videos together, sing together, dance together and play together.

‘When they create their music, most musicians hope their work is going to be experienced by people together, not just listened to alone on headphones.

‘Yes, it’s great to enjoy music when you’re on the move or commuting, but it’s even better when enjoyed together on a TV as a music video — that way we feed off each other’s emotional reactions to the audio-visual experience.

‘This next revolution in digital entertainment is about shared experiences that unite friends and family.

‘The launch of our new TV Music App is just the beginning. We have a raft of exciting new ROXi innovations and experiences planned for the future.’

Alongside playing regular and singalong tracks, the TV Music App will also have exclusive music video channels, music-based games and be kept up-to-date with all the latest music releases from leading companies like Merlin, Sony Music Entertainment, the Universal Music Group and the Warner Music Group.

Polling of 2,002 respondents commissioned by ROXi and undertaken by Censuswide indicates that some 83 per cent Britons now use smart TVs — with nearly two-thirds of these have increased the use of the sets during lockdown.

In fact, the data shows that the average numbers of hours spend with smart TVs before COVID-19 was 4.5 — but this rose to some 6.5 hours a day during the height of the pandemic. 

When asked about the prospect of having free, unlimited music video streaming on their TV, a total 64 per cent of respondents were keen — with the most enthusiastic demographic being 25–44-year-olds, for whom it appealed to nearly 1-in-5 people. 

Furthermore, just over half of all respondents said that they felt that watching music videos and singing karaoke on the TV at home would bring their friends and family closer together — increasing to 72 per cent among the 16–24-year-olds. 

ROXi — whose music service is said to have boomed during lockdown — is aiming to do for music on TV what apps like Netflix and Disney+ have done for streamed video

ROXi — whose music service is said to have boomed during lockdown — is aiming to do for music on TV what apps like Netflix and Disney+ have done for streamed video

Launched in 2017 by British entrepreneur Rob Lewis, ROXi is backed by a number of high-name musicians, including Sheryl Crow (pictured), Kylie Minogue and Robbie Williams

Launched in 2017 by British entrepreneur Rob Lewis, ROXi is backed by a number of high-name musicians, including Sheryl Crow (pictured), Kylie Minogue and Robbie Williams

To promote the launch — in what one might call a ‘mike drop’ — the firm is giving away more than a million ROXi Karaoke Microphones, each worth £29.99, to new ROXi Premium users

'We’re bringing music videos, karaoke and games into people’s homes through a TV Music App for free — so millions of households can enjoy music videos together, sing together, dance together and play together,' said ROXi founder and CEO, Rob Lewis

‘We’re bringing music videos, karaoke and games into people’s homes through a TV Music App for free — so millions of households can enjoy music videos together, sing together, dance together and play together,’ said ROXi founder and CEO, Rob Lewis

Pictured: ROXi founder and CEO, Rob Lewis

Pictured: ROXi founder and CEO, Rob Lewis

‘We are about to see a seismic shift in the way we consume and interact with music at home. The mass adoption of TV Apps like Netflix and Disney+ is only the beginning,’ Mr Lewis added.

‘ROXi is leading the charge in the second TV App revolution; music videos, games and karaoke,’ he continued.

‘This revolution is accelerating. According to Statista, annual Smart TV sales are now projected to reach 266 million globally by 2025.

‘Watching music videos, singing karaoke and playing games using TV Apps will become as mainstream as watching movies via TV Apps — the opportunity is really substantial.

‘The TV App revolution means something we could only previously deliver through relatively expensive hardware, can now be made available completely free to everyone — our vision is to rapidly bring ROXi to 500 million TVs worldwide.’

More information on the new TV Music App can be found on the ROXi website.

'Watching music videos, singing karaoke and playing games using TV Apps will become as mainstream as watching movies via TV Apps,' said Mr Lewis

‘Watching music videos, singing karaoke and playing games using TV Apps will become as mainstream as watching movies via TV Apps,’ said Mr Lewis

'The TV App revolution means something we could only previously deliver through relatively expensive hardware, can now be made available completely free to everyone — our vision is to rapidly bring ROXi to 500 million TVs worldwide,' Mr Lewis continued

‘The TV App revolution means something we could only previously deliver through relatively expensive hardware, can now be made available completely free to everyone — our vision is to rapidly bring ROXi to 500 million TVs worldwide,’ Mr Lewis continued

MUSIC IS A UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE

A recent study has found global links between musical form and vocals, meaning that a love ballad will sound the same no matter what culture it originates in.

The Harvard-led research asked 750 internet users from 60 different countries to listen to 14-second excerpts from songs.

The songs traversed a variety of places from around the world and included tracks from less commonly heard societies, such as hunter-gatherers or cattle farmers.

Participants were then asked to answer six questions about how they perceived the songs, whether its purpose was for dancing or to express love, for instance.

Songs in the study could have also been linked to soothing a baby, healing an illness, mourning the dead or for telling a story – but only four types of song were actually present, according to researchers.

The data, after more than 26,000 excerpts were listened to, revealed an accurate description of the song’s function cross-culturally.

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