Jeremy Clarkson fans queue for hours to see ex-Top Gear host at his Diddly Squat farm in Cotswolds


Jeremy Clarkson fans cause chaos in the Cotswolds with three-hour traffic jams to meet presenter at his Diddly Squat farm shop

  • Fans flocked to Jeremy Clarkson’s Diddly Squat shop at his Oxfordshire farm 
  • Ex-Top Gear host, 61, seeing success with Amazon Prime series Clarkson’s Farm
  • Huge traffic queues disrupted the once sleepy Cotswolds village of Chadlington 
  • Police were called to manage the ensuing car chaos as fans queued for hours 

Police were called out after hundreds of Jeremy Clarkson fans descended on his farm in the off chance of meeting him on the weekend.

The ex-Top Gear host, 61, has apparently settled for a serene farming lifestyle as part of his new hit Amazon Prime show, Clarkson’s Farm.

As part of the series, Clarkson works on his 1,000 acre farm, located between Chipping Norton and Chadlington in the idyllic Cotswolds countryside in Oxfordshire. 

But the show’s roaring success – and the opening of Clarkson’s popular Diddly Squat Farm Shop – has created chaos for villagers who are more accustomed to cows than congestion. 

Locals were left horrified this weekend after pictures emerged of hundreds of cars piling up on nearby roads, causing huge queues for residents. 

Hundreds of Jeremy Clarkson fans descended on his Oxfordshire farm in the hopes of spotting him this weekend

Chadlington residents were left horrified as large queues formed on the usually quiet country roads in the idyllic Cotswolds countryside

Chadlington residents were left horrified as large queues formed on the usually quiet country roads in the idyllic Cotswolds countryside

One wrote on a local Facebook forum: ‘Avoid going anywhere near Diddly Squat farm shop, whole road is blocked again, but worse there are people stopping on the 60mph bend with nowhere to go.’  

Others warned the congestion at the scene was an ‘accident waiting to happen’. 

‘Clarkson will not be remotely bothered. I’m sure he’s laughing at us all from behind the shop till,’ a third person added.

The emergency services were contacted as pictures emerged of hundreds of cars being left at the side of the road.  

Crowds and queues built up at the Diddly Squat Farm Shop the day after the release of the hit Amazon Prime Video series, Clarkson's Farm

Crowds and queues built up at the Diddly Squat Farm Shop the day after the release of the hit Amazon Prime Video series, Clarkson’s Farm

The show's roaring success - and the opening of Clarkson's popular Diddly Squat Farm Shop - has created chaos for villagers who are more accustomed to cows than congestion

The show’s roaring success – and the opening of Clarkson’s popular Diddly Squat Farm Shop – has created chaos for villagers who are more accustomed to cows than congestion

A Thames Valley Police spokesperson said: ‘Officers received reports in relation to congestion on the roads in Chadlington.

‘Officers attended the scene, but no crime had been committed.

‘Our neighbourhood team for the area is aware of the situation.’

Viewers have rated the new show highly as Jeremy realised the harsh realities of working land to produce crops and rear livestock, amid a global pandemic and record-breaking rainfall

Viewers have rated the new show highly as Jeremy realised the harsh realities of working land to produce crops and rear livestock, amid a global pandemic and record-breaking rainfall

Clarkson bought the plot of land in the Cotswolds in 2008 and Clarkson¿s Farm follows the presenter's highs and lows of tackling a 1,000 acre working farm

Clarkson bought the plot of land in the Cotswolds in 2008 and Clarkson’s Farm follows the presenter’s highs and lows of tackling a 1,000 acre working farm

Jeremy Clarkson bought the plot of land in 2008 and Clarkson’s Farm follows the presenter’s highs and lows of tackling a 1,000 acre working farm. 

The presenter recently revealed he was ‘the happiest he has ever been’ and that he ‘loved every second’ of filming the new hit show.

His Diddly Squat shop is described as a ‘small barn full of good, no-nonsense things’ on its official website. 

The Amazon Prime series follows an intense and frequently hilarious year in the life of Britain’s most unlikely farmer and his team, as they contend with the worst farming weather in decades, disobedient animals, unresponsive crops, and an unexpected pandemic.

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