‘It’s laughable!’ Nigel Farage brushes off nosedive in Brexit Party support ahead of election

‘It’s laughable!’ Nigel Farage brushes off nosedive in Brexit Party support suggesting it could win ‘a handful’ of seats despite split over its election strategy

  • He claimed that candidates contesting Labour-held seats were in contention
  • It same after four MEPs walked out over fears the party would split Brexiteer vote
  • Farage: ‘There are a handful in which we really have a great chance of winning’

Nigel Farage insisted that the Brexit Party could still get its first MPs in Thursday’s election, brushing off a nosedive in the polls today as ‘laughable’.

He claimed that candidates contesting Labour-held seats were in contention in ‘a handful’ of working class Leave-voting areas.

It comes after four MEPs including Annunziata Rees-Mogg, the sister of Tory Cabinet minister Jacob, walked out over fears the party would split the Brexiteer vote.   

She, John Longworth, the former British Chambers of Commerce chief, Lance Forman and Lucy Harris resigned and appealed for colleagues to follow their example.

Mr Farage announced last month that his party would not stand in Tory-held seats but go after Labour and the Liberal Democrats. 

Some opinion poll this weekend  have support for Mr Farage’s party as low as 2 per cent.

But speaking on Sky’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday today he said: ‘I promise you, when you sit there  and see the results coming through we will be on 13-14 per cent.

‘There are a handful in which we really have a great chance of winning, but our vote could be split by the Conservatives. That’s the battle for the next four days.’

He claimed that candidates contesting Labour-held seats were in contention in ‘a handful’ of working class Leave-voting areas

But opinion polls have support for the Brexit Party as low as 2 per cent this weekend after it agreed not to contest Tory seats

But opinion polls have support for the Brexit Party as low as 2 per cent this weekend after it agreed not to contest Tory seats

Mr Farage announced last month that his party would not stand in seats held by Boris Johnson (pictured today) but go after Labour and the Liberal Democrats.

Mr Farage announced last month that his party would not stand in seats held by Boris Johnson (pictured today) but go after Labour and the Liberal Democrats.

He added: ‘I wanted to stop a second referendum and I think the effect of us standing in the South and the South East would have been two dozen plus Liberal Democrat gains. We’ve stopped that.’ 

Mr Farage insisted his party would continue even after Brexit, but with a change in emphasis and name to the Reform Party, a title he claimed to have already registered.

‘It will have to reform into the Reform Party, it’ll have to campaign to change politics for good, get rid of the House of Lords, change the voting system, so much to do,’ he said.

‘Again, you’ll see on Thursday the turnout much lower than the pundits expect because people have lost faith in politics.’ 

Mr Farage also tore into the Prime Minister over his immigration policy plans.

Annunziata Rees-Mogg, sister of Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, shakes hands with Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage at the launch of the Brexit Party in April

Annunziata Rees-Mogg, sister of Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, shakes hands with Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage at the launch of the Brexit Party in April

Boris Johnson insisted he would cut immigration into the UK as he unveiled plans to clampdown on low-skilled migrants moving to the UK.

The Prime Minister lashed out at EU citizens who ‘treat the UK as though it’s basically part of their own country’ as he talked up Tory plans for a migration system based on that of Australia. 

The Conservatives have announced that they would allocate points on a range of different criteria which effectively put people into three categories under a system Home Secretary Priti Patel said would bring ‘overall immigration down’. 

But the party has refused to put a figure on post-Brexit immigration. 

Mr Farage claimed that the PM ‘has always been very soft on the immigration issue, but you know what, there’s an election on so tell people what they want to hear’.

He said: ‘They’re (Tories) beginning to say the same things, the problem is they’ll make no real commitment to cut the numbers coming in and this is the fourth Conservative manifesto in a row promising to reduce numbers.’ 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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