Instagram launches new supervision tools that let UK parents see who their child is following


Instagram has launched a series of new supervision tools to allow parents to keep closer tabs on what their child is looking at, and how long they spend on the app.

Parents or guardians will be able to set daily limits for how long their teen can spend on the photo-sharing app, and schedule breaks for specific times. 

They will also be able to see which account their child follows, and which ones follow them.

Meta, Instagram’s parent company, announced the new tools in the US in March, but will now begin rolling them out globally. 

The company has also applied supervision tools to the Oculus Quest headsets, including giving supervisors the ability to block inappropriate apps.

The tools are designed to support parents, guardians and teens alike to browse their apps safely, and could be provided to UK users as early as this month.

Instagram has launched a series of new supervision tools to allow parents to keep closer tabs on what their child is looking at, and how long they spend on the app

Concerned parents will be able to send an invitation to initiate supervision of their teen's Instagram account after the new tools are rolled out

Parents who have been accepted as a supervisor will be able to view a dashboard showing their child’s daily habits on the platform

Concerned parents will be able to send an invitation to initiate supervision of their teen’s Instagram account after the new tools are rolled out

Parents will be able to view a dashboard showing their child’s daily habits on the platform

Parents will be able to view a dashboard showing their child’s daily habits on the platform

Concerned parents will be able to send an invitation to initiate supervision of their teen’s Instagram account after the new tools are rolled out.

Previously, only the teen was able to send out these invitations. 

Supervisors will be able to set specific times during the day or week when they would like to limit their teen’s use of Instagram.

They can also see more information when their teen reports an account or post, including who was reported, and the type of report.

In addition, parents will be able to view a dashboard showing their child’s daily habits on the platform.

The parental supervision features automatically end when the child turns 18, Instagram confirmed.

Supervisors will be able to set specific times during the day or week when they would like to limit their teen’s use of Instagram

The parental supervision features automatically end when the child turns 18, Instagram confirmed

Supervisors will be able to set specific times when they would like to limit their teen’s use of Instagram. The parental supervision features automatically end when the child turns 18

Teenagers using Instagram will be able to let their parent know if they have reported an account or post

Parents or guardians who have been nominated as the supervisor of their teen's Instagram account can see information when their teen reports an account or post

Instagram has launched a series of new supervision tools to allow parents to keep closer tabs on what their child is looking at, and how long they spend on the app

Starting this month, these tools will begin rolling out in the UK, Japan, Australia, Ireland, Canada, France and Germany, with plans to roll out globally before the end of the year. 

Parents in the US already set up with earlier versions of the supervisor tools will now have the new features available to them. 

Instagram will also be including more articles from experts in its online Family Centre to help teens and their parents navigate the digital world.    

The roll-out will coincide with a new ‘nudges’ feature being tested in the UK and Ireland, designed to help young people become more mindful of the content they are looking at.

This will see a notification that encourages them to switch to a different topic on the platform if they are repeatedly looking at the same type of content on the app’s Explore tab.

It also excludes certain topics that may be associated with appearance comparison. 

Meta said it designed this feature because research has suggested ‘nudges can be effective for helping people – especially teens – be more mindful of how they’re using social media in the moment’.

The nudges will work alongside the ‘Take A Break’ feature that was announced last December, which reminds scrollers to step away from the screen with a notification after a user-defined period of time.

Meta is currently testing a ‘Take A Break’ feature for users scrolling through ‘Reel’ videos, where a video reminder from a popular content creator will appear. 

The company also plans to provide young creators in the US with advice from experts in child psychology and digital literacy on how to create responsible content and look after themselves and others while online. 

WHAT FEATURES DOES INSTAGRAM HAVE TO PROTECT YOUNG PEOPLE ONLINE?

For parents and guardians: 

Parents or guardians can send invitations to their teens asking to set up supervision tools on their account 

Supervisors can set specific times during the day or week when they would like to limit their teen’s use of Instagram

Supervisors can see when their teen reports an account or post, and information about it

Supervisors will have access to a dashboard showing their child’s daily habits on the platform 

 

For teens:

‘Nudge’ notifications that encourages them to switch to a different topic on if they are repeatedly looking at the same type of content on the app

 ‘Take A Break’ notifications that remind a user to step away from their screen after a user-defined period of time

Teens can send invitations to their parents inviting them to set up supervision tools on their account

All the new features have been designed with the input of teens, parents, experts, and policymakers. 

Vicki Shotbolt, CEO of Parent Zone, which will inform articles in the Instagram Family Centre, said: ‘It is really encouraging to know that Meta has been listening to young people and their parents and creating tools that encourage timely conversations. 

‘At Parent Zone, we know how difficult it can be for parents when they feel locked out of their children’s digital worlds. 

‘With these new tools, we are seeing a shift to greater partnership between families and platforms and that is an incredibly positive step.’

Meta has also announce the launch of new supervisor tools for their Oculus Quest VR headset

Meta has also announce the launch of new supervisor tools for their Oculus Quest VR headset 

Meta has also launched new supervisor tools for its Oculus Quest VR headset.

Parents will be able to approve or deny their teen’s downloads or app purchases from the Oculus mobile app, if they come with an age rating.

They will also be able to view all of the apps that their teen owns, and block them from launching apps that may be inappropriate.   

Other features include ‘purchase notifications’, alerting them when their teen makes a purchase in VR, and the ability to view their headset screen time from the Oculus mobile app.

They will also be able to view their Oculus friend list, and prevent them from accessing certain content from their PC on their Quest headset.

Unlike with the Instagram supervision features, the teen must initiate the process, and both the parent and teen have to agree.

These new tools were initially announced in March but will now start rolling out globally.

There will be a guide available on how to use all the new tools and to help parents discuss virtual reality with their teens.

Dr. Sameer Hinduja, Co-Director of the Cyberbullying Research Center, said: ‘With VR technologies increasingly gaining traction, and the Quest becoming a favourite product of many youth, parents and guardians will now have access to a suite of tools to safeguard and stay involved with their teen’s participation and experiences.

‘We’re glad that Meta continues to seek out data-driven insight from scholars and practitioners in various social scientific fields to build solutions that seek to equip youth, families and educators with the tools and resources they need to safely enjoy exploring and interacting on their favourite platforms.’

SCIENTISTS WARN THERE ARE ALMOST 50 HARMFUL EFFECTS LINKED TO THE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA SITES SUCH AS FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM 

There are almost 50 harmful effects linked to the use of social media, a 2021 study reveals – and they’re not just mental health-related.  

Academics at the University of Technology Sydney report a hefty 46 harmful effects linked to the use of sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

For the study, the team reviewed more than 50 research articles published between 2003 and 2018.  

In 2003, social media was still in its infancy and Facebook wouldn’t be established for another year. One of the early social networks, MySpace, was founded in 2003.  

Among the 46 harmful effects of social media were found to be privacy violation, deception, panic, conflict with others and an increased appetite for taking financial risk. 

Overall, issues of social media range from physical and mental health problems to negative impacts on job and academic performance, as well as security and privacy issues, according to the academics. 

Read the 46 harmful effects of social media here

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk