Inside the Okura Tokyo where Barack Obama and John Lennon have stayed after its £800million revamp 

Supersonic £320 Dyson hairdryers and Japan’s biggest suite: Inside the iconic Tokyo hotel John Lennon and Barack Obama have stayed in after its £800million revamp

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One of Japan’s most renowned hotels – Hotel Okura Tokyo – has reopened after an £800million ($1billion) revamp that took four years to complete.

And it’s back with £320 ($400) Dyson hairdryers and the largest hotel suite in the country.

The original Okura Tokyo opened in 1962 and welcomed all manner of famous faces over the years, including John Lennon, Steve Jobs, Barack Obama and Margaret Thatcher.

Hotel Okura Tokyo has reopened after an £800million ($1billion) revamp that took four years to complete. Pictured are officials cutting the tape to mark the opening

The original Okura Tokyo opened in 1962 and welcomed all manner of famous faces over the years, including John Lennon, Steve Jobs, Barack Obama and Margaret Thatcher

The original Okura Tokyo opened in 1962 and welcomed all manner of famous faces over the years, including John Lennon, Steve Jobs, Barack Obama and Margaret Thatcher

Famous types will no doubt carry on checking in to the refreshed version, which reopened as The Okura Tokyo.

The new hotel comprises two brand new buildings – a 17-storey structure called the Okura Heritage Wing and the larger Okura Prestige Tower, which has 41-storeys and reaches a height of 188-metres (616ft).

A total of 508 luxury rooms, many of which have stunning city views, are available altogether.

The Heritage Wing has its own reception with, the hotel said in a statement, ‘refreshing views of gardens and greenery on three sides’.

It continued: ‘The Okura Heritage Wing is a top-end luxury hotel with a tasteful, classically Japanese atmosphere. The beloved Yamazato Japanese restaurant is making its much-awaited return here, as is the renowned Chosho-an tea ceremony room, making the Okura Heritage Wing the perfect choice for special gatherings in elegant Japanese settings.’

The new hotel comprises two brand new buildings – a 17-storey structure called the Okura Heritage Wing and the larger Okura Prestige Tower (pictured), which has 41-storeys and reaches a height of 188-metres (616ft)

The new hotel comprises two brand new buildings – a 17-storey structure called the Okura Heritage Wing and the larger Okura Prestige Tower (pictured), which has 41-storeys and reaches a height of 188-metres (616ft)

In the Heritage Wing bedrooms, guests will discover granite bathrooms, Bamford toiletries and Dyson Supersonic hair dryers with a dark grey look that’s exclusive to the Okura.

The Prestige Tower houses the aforementioned super-sized suite, which is spread over the top two floors and comprises a 730-square-meter living space (7,857-square-feet) with three bedrooms.

The hotel said: ‘With its two-storey-ceiling living room and event-ready theater, the luxurious suite will also be an exceptional venue for one-of-a-kind meetings. Additionally, the bathroom of the master bedroom will feature a Ne-Yu bed bath and Utase-Yu waterfall bath for supreme relaxation.’

The top floor is also home to Sazanka, the hotel’s reborn teppanyaki restaurant.

The lobby of The Okura Prestige Tower has been designed by Yoshio Taniguchi, celebrated architect of the redesigned Museum of Modern Art in New York and son of Yoshiro Taniguchi, designer of the Hotel Okura Tokyo’s famous lobby, in a nod to the Okura legacy.

Legacy decorations from the original hotel grace the new lobby, including distinctive hexagonal Okura Lantern ceiling lights, lacquered tables and chairs arranged like plum flowers, and the world map and clock displaying global time zones.

Mr Taniguchi said: ‘The original lobby designed by my father, Yoshiro Taniguchi, was extremely popular, so I was honored to have been asked to redesign the new main lobby of the Okura Tokyo, at the same time feeling a sense of destiny and responsibility. 

‘It was a challenge to not only re-create the old main lobby but to turn it into something even more wonderful, and I hope that the new main lobby will be beloved by all guests and visitors to the Okura Tokyo for many years to come.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk