Inside the ‘lucky girl syndrome’ that has taken over TikTok


The new year has ushered in a new trend of women convincing themselves they are the ‘luckiest people’ in the world in an effort to enhance their lives and call on good fortune. 

Laura Galebe, an influencer in New York City, introduced the concept of ‘lucky girl syndrome’ on TikTok in mid-December, claiming the key to her success is ‘being delusional’ and thinking ‘great things are always happening’ to her. 

‘I genuinely consider myself one of the luckiest people I know,’ she explained in the video, which has been viewed more than 2.7 million times. ‘I get some of the most insane opportunities thrown at me out of know where.’

Laura Galebe, an influencer in New York City, has gone viral after introducing the concept of ‘lucky girl syndrome’ on TikTok in mid-December 

Galebe credited her success to 'being delusional' and thinking 'great things are always happening' to her. 'I genuinely consider myself one of the luckiest people I know,' she said

Galebe credited her success to 'being delusional' and thinking 'great things are always happening' to her. 'I genuinely consider myself one of the luckiest people I know,' she said

Galebe credited her success to ‘being delusional’ and thinking ‘great things are always happening’ to her. ‘I genuinely consider myself one of the luckiest people I know,’ she said 

Galebe isn’t sure of the exact point that she started thinking this way, but she firmly believes that the odds are always in her favor.  

‘Ever since I can remember, I’ve always made it a point to tell everyone, “I am so lucky.” I just always expect great things to happen to me, and so they do,’ she insisted. ‘Nothing ever doesn’t go my way, and if it doesn’t go the exact way that I want it to go, then something better comes up after it.’ 

Galebe regularly tells herself that ‘great things are always happening to me unexpectedly,’ but she noted that her luck didn’t change until she ‘genuinely believed’ what she was saying.  

‘The secret is to assume and believe it before the concrete proof shows up. BE DELUSIONAL,’ she added in the caption. 

The hashtag #luckygirlsyndrome has more than 42 million views on TikTok, where a number of users have posted videos about their own experiences with the concept.

TikTok user @skzzolno and her friend opened up about how utilizing the theory changed their lives in a video posted the day before New Year’s Eve. 

TikTok user @skzzolno and her friend insisted the concept changed their lives, saying it helped them get the bedrooms they wanted in their new apartment

TikTok user @skzzolno and her friend insisted the concept changed their lives, saying it helped them get the bedrooms they wanted in their new apartment 

They explained that they were moving into a new apartment with two other roommates and wanted the bedrooms on the bottom floor. Instead of asking for the rooms, they started telling themselves, ‘Everything just works out for us.’ 

A day or two later, one of their roommates came up to them and said they should take the bottom rooms just like they wanted.  

‘It was literally just an experiment. We’re like, “Let’s see if it works,” and it literally works,’ they agreed. ‘Just try it and see.’ 

Megan, who uses the handle @meganguilbeax, detailed how she saw their video and decided to try it out for herself in the new year. 

She claimed that within a day of telling herself she was lucky and everything works out for her, she went viral on TikTok, manifested a trip to Las Vegas with her friends, and had someone pay for her manicure. 

Megan’s video about her manifestation success has also gone viral and has been viewed more than 10 million times. 

Megan (@meganguilbeax) said the day after she told herself she was lucky and everything works out for her, she went viral, manifested a trip to Las Vegas, and had someone pay for her manicure

Megan (@meganguilbeax) said the day after she told herself she was lucky and everything works out for her, she went viral, manifested a trip to Las Vegas, and had someone pay for her manicure

Kris (@krrenee) claimed within an hour of waking up and saying her lucky girl affirmations, she got a message from a company she was just saying she wanted to work for

Kris (@krrenee) claimed within an hour of waking up and saying her lucky girl affirmations, she got a message from a company she was just saying she wanted to work for 

Meanwhile, Kris (@krrenee) shared how another person advised saying your affirmations right when you start to wake up and your brain is still deeply relaxed in the theta state. 

Theta brain waves are believed to be important for processing information and making memories, according to Healthline. 

Kris claimed that ‘within an hour’ of saying her affirmations in the morning, she got a message from a company she was just saying she wanted to work for. She also had someone offer to buy her snacks at a concession stand on New Year’s Day. 

TikTok user Katelyn (@abelina_shop) admitted that she was skeptical while researching the concept, but she still woke up saying, ‘I’m the luckiest girl in the world and everything always works out for me.’ 

She said a barista gave her a coffee for free that morning, and while it’s ‘not a big deal,’ she became convinced that the universe is trying to tell her ‘this is real.’  

Alicia Maclaren, who is known as @aliciaamaclaren on the platform, insisted that she has lucky girl syndrome and anyone else can have it too. 

TikTok user Katelyn (@abelina_shop) admitted that she was skeptical while researching the concept, but became a believer after a barista gave her a free coffee

TikTok user Katelyn (@abelina_shop) admitted that she was skeptical while researching the concept, but became a believer after a barista gave her a free coffee 

Alicia Maclaren, who is known as @aliciaamaclaren on the platform, insisted that she has lucky girl syndrome and anyone else can have it too

Alicia Maclaren, who is known as @aliciaamaclaren on the platform, insisted that she has lucky girl syndrome and anyone else can have it too

Alicia Maclaren, who is known as @aliciaamaclaren on the platform, insisted that she has lucky girl syndrome and anyone else can have it too

Cyn (@cynharlow) contributed to the conversation by sharing a video dedicated to her favorite lucky girl syndrome affirmations

Cyn (@cynharlow) contributed to the conversation by sharing a video dedicated to her favorite lucky girl syndrome affirmations

‘You’re going to need to be delusional, and you’re going to need to convince yourself over and over again that you are the luckiest girl in the world,’ she explained. ‘I am not joking when I say you will create your dream life doing this.’

And Cyn (@cynharlow) contributed to the conversation by sharing a video dedicated to her favorite lucky girl syndrome affirmations.

‘I am so lucky. Everything is always working out for me. Miracles happen to me daily’ she wrote in the on-screen text. 

Lucky girl syndrome is essentially an old manifestation concept with a new name. Many have compared it to the law of assumption, a theory that states whatever you assume to be true will become your reality. 

Author and mystic Neville Goddard, a pioneer in the law of assumption, believed that people could change their lives by changing their feelings. 

The stories of lucky girl syndrome’s success on TikTok are merely anecdotal, but some experts say there are benefits to adding an extra dose of positivity to your day. 

Hypnotherapist Laurnie Wilson (@laurnie.wilson) noted in her video that lucky girl syndrome and the law of assumption is ‘self-hypnosis.’ 

Hypnotherapist Laurnie Wilson explained that if you repeatedly tell yourself something and have a feeling attached to it, you can create new neural pathways in your brain

Hypnotherapist Laurnie Wilson explained that if you repeatedly tell yourself something and have a feeling attached to it, you can create new neural pathways in your brain

Clinical psychology researcher Katina Bajaj cited psychologist Dr. Barbara Fredrickson's 'broaden-and-build' theory that positive emotions can broaden one's attention

Clinical psychology researcher Katina Bajaj cited psychologist Dr. Barbara Fredrickson's 'broaden-and-build' theory that positive emotions can broaden one's attention

Clinical psychology researcher Katina Bajaj cited psychologist Dr. Barbara Fredrickson’s ‘broaden-and-build’ theory that positive emotions can broaden one’s attention

'Experiencing a positive emotion literally broadens our perspective and changes the way we see the world,' she said

‘Experiencing a positive emotion literally broadens our perspective and changes the way we see the world,’ she said 

She explained that if you repeatedly tell yourself something and have a feeling attached to it, you can create new neural pathways in your brain that will then change your behavior.  

Clinical psychology researcher Katina Bajaj (@katina.bajaj) also shared the scientific reason why she is on board with the trending concept.

‘There’s a difference between how positive and negative emotions are coded in our brain, and even more importantly, there’s a major difference in how it impacts our emotions for long afterward,’ she said.

She cited psychologist Dr. Barbara Fredrickson’s ‘broaden-and-build’ theory that positive emotions can broaden one’s attention. 

‘[It] suggests that when we experience a positive emotion like joy, gratitude, [or] love, it sends our brain on a positive upward spiral,’ she explained. ‘We search for or seek out resources that allow us to feel more positive and notice other good things happening in our life.

‘That is the foundation of the lucky girl syndrome. Experiencing a positive emotion literally broadens our perspective and changes the way we see the world.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk