How many times should you have sex per week? Jake Maddock on TikTok


A controversial relationship expert has revealed how often couples should have sex – and says his stats are proven by ‘science’.  

Jake Maddock, from Brisbane, says you should be intimate with your partner two to three times a week because it provides ‘mental and physical health benefits’ and ‘hormonal regulation’.  

‘There’s a whole bunch of science behind this. It’s been shown with studies that it’s very good for females to orgasm three times a week. It’s good for their mental health, their physical health, it’s good for their bodies, Jake said in a TikTok video.

Controversial relationship coach Jake Maddock (pictured), from Brisbane says couples should get intimate two to three times a week because it provides mental and physical health benefits

The popular Aussie TikTok and Instagram love coach shared a video explaining how having sex more frequently helps couples strengthen their bond

He said it's also good for the mental and physical health of both men and women

The popular Aussie TikTok and Instagram love coach shared a video explaining how having sex more frequently helps couples strengthen their bond. He said it’s also good for the mental and physical health of both men and women

Poll

How many times do you have sex per week?

  • Once 573 votes
  • Two – three 414 votes
  • Four – five 210 votes
  • Daily 173 votes
  • Never 901 votes

‘Good for men’s hormonal regulation, mental health, physical health. There’s lots of good things that happen.

‘[Having sex] two to three times a week is also going to help you guys bond together really well.’ 

He said over time as couples become comfortable with each other they start to get into ‘lazy’ habits by not having sex as often. 

‘People in long-term relationships seem to get lazy and they go “once a week is fine”, “once a month is fine”, they just get lazier and lazier, and you drift apart,’ he said. 

 ‘So two to three times a week really keeps people on track.’

A study published in Archives of Sexual Behaviour revealed married couples have sex 51 times a year – about once a week.  

But others argue there’s no ‘magic number’ when it comes to how often you and your partner are intimate. 

Couples therapist and sexologist Isiah McKimmie told House of Wellness the number varies and is based on life and circumstances. 

‘There isn’t a set amount of sex that makes for a great relationship, and it’s normal for two partners to have different ideas of how much sex they want,’ Isiah said.

‘What’s important is that couples work together to find sexual enjoyment that works for both of them.’ 

Jake said over time couples start to get 'lazy' by not having sex as often. 'People in long-term relationships seem to get lazy and they go "once a week is fine", "once a month is fine", they just get lazier and lazier, and you drift apart. So two to three times a week really keeps people on track,' he said (stock image)

Jake said over time couples start to get ‘lazy’ by not having sex as often. ‘People in long-term relationships seem to get lazy and they go “once a week is fine”, “once a month is fine”, they just get lazier and lazier, and you drift apart. So two to three times a week really keeps people on track,’ he said (stock image) 

Previously Jake shared how fighting over text message, also known as fexting, is a guaranteed way to ruin your love life.

Jake wants people to have adult conversations face-to-face instead of slinging insults, passive aggressive lines and demands on their partners over text.

Speaking to FEMAIL the popular TikTok and Instagram love coach said ‘fexting’ is this year’s ‘biggest new trend’ but it’s lethal for relationships.

‘Rage texting rarely filters. That makes it more dangerous than having an affair,’ he said.

‘Texting is impulsive and it creates false bravado. We’re more likely to blurt out something we wouldn’t be brave, or stupid, enough to say face to face.’ 

He admits writing can be a useful tool for arguments as it gives people a chance to think about what they want to say – but this doesn’t work for texting. 

‘Communication relies on a lot of cues – facial expression, body language and tone of voice as well as the words used. Fexting denies you access to three of these. Meaning and emotions in texts can be vastly misinterpreted,’ he said.

Previously Jake shared how fighting over text message, also known as fexting, is a guaranteed way to ruin your love life. 'Fexting ends when you stop fexting. Often that doesn't mean the argument is resolved and even if it does, resentments, hurt and anger tend to linger,' he said (stock image)

Previously Jake shared how fighting over text message, also known as fexting, is a guaranteed way to ruin your love life. ‘Fexting ends when you stop fexting. Often that doesn’t mean the argument is resolved and even if it does, resentments, hurt and anger tend to linger,’ he said (stock image)

He wants people to remember that arguments that don’t cause damage are ones that are solved quickly.

When people argue over text they can delay their replies – leaving their partner’s anger to fester, he explained.

Poll

Do you argue with your partner over text?

  • Yes 230 votes
  • No 683 votes
  • We don’t argue 201 votes

On the other hand people can barrage each other with a string of angry messages which will annoy and infuriate their other half.

He said that too many third-wheels can find themselves involved in arguments done over texts which just makes things worse.

‘Fexting lets you argue at times when you shouldn’t – when you’re working and only half-focused on what the other person is telling you, when you’re out with friends and feeling reckless, when you’re with someone who may interfere and inflame the argument,’ he said.

In a face-to-face argument you are forced to listen to what the other person is saying, he explained, which means you take in their point of view.

‘You’re much more likely to skim over a fext and just smash back your own argument,’ he said.

Jake believes a ‘good argument’ ends in a hug, or more.

‘Physical contact revives the intimacy between you, not to mention the sexual desire that glues you together and dissolves bad feelings between you,’ he said.

‘Fexting ends when you stop fexting. Often that doesn’t mean the argument is resolved and even if it does, resentments, hurt and anger tend to linger.’



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