Grimes admits she has a number of fake Twitter accounts she uses to ‘get into fights’ 


Singer Grimes said Twitter is responsible for a lot of issues in ‘public mental health’ in an interview days after her ex-partner and ‘best friend’ Elon Musk bought the social media site for $44 billion.

The ‘We Appreciate Power’ singer added that despite the platform’s problems, she still has various ‘fake Twitter accounts’ that she uses to argue with people with different opinions.  

‘I, like, go into different algorithmic bubbles to try to, like, understand,’ she told MIT artificial intelligence researcher Lex Fridman. ‘I’ll keep getting in fights with people and realize we’re not actually fighting.’

The Canadian artist, born Claire Boucher, mostly kept quiet about her thoughts on Musk’s recent purchase. 

Grimes and Musk began dating in 2018 and have two children, son X Æ A-Xii and daughter Y, who was born via surrogate in December. 

Some Twitter employees and users are worried that the billionaire may simultaneously stifle free speech and give voice to dangerous ideas.

‘Due to my proximity to the current dramas, I honestly feel that I should not have opinions about this because, if Elon ends up getting Twitter, that is being the arbiter of truth or public discussion. That is a responsibility – I am not qualified to be responsible for that, and I do not want to say something that might, like, dismantle democracy.’

Singer and producer Grimes, 34, said Twitter is responsible for problems in ‘public mental health’ days after her ex-partner Elon Musk bought the site for $44 billion

Despite this, the 'We Appreciate Power' singer said she keeps multiple Twitter accounts to argue through various issues from different perspectives

Despite this, the ‘We Appreciate Power’ singer said she keeps multiple Twitter accounts to argue through various issues from different perspectives

Grimes and Musk share son X Æ A-Xii (pictured) and daughter Y, who was born via surrogate in December

Grimes and Musk share son X Æ A-Xii (pictured) and daughter Y, who was born via surrogate in December

Some Twitter employees and users argue that Musk, worth a reported $246.2 billion, may simultaneously stifle free speech from critics and give voice to dangerous ideas

Some Twitter employees and users argue that Musk, worth a reported $246.2 billion, may simultaneously stifle free speech from critics and give voice to dangerous ideas

In March, Grimes, 34, tweeted that she and Musk, 50, had broken up, but that he remains her ‘best friend and the love of my life.’

She appeared on the ‘Lex Fridman Podcast’ in an interview published Friday.

The podcast hosts ‘conversations about the nature of intelligence, consciousness, love, and power,’ according to its website.

Fridman, 35, has been a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 2015, focusing on ‘human-centered AI, especially in the context of autonomous vehicles.’

Over the course of two hours, he and the ‘Kill V. Maim’ singer touched on everything from fame to technology to the future of the human species, with Grimes saying that she believes humans have entered a new phase of existence properly labeled ‘homo techno.’

She said it was important to focus on ‘undoing the bad energy surrounding the emergence of Silicon Valley.’

But too much of a negative focus on the ‘technocracy boom’ could have consequences, she added.

Grimes, born Claire Boucher, and Musk began dating in 2018. In March, the singer said they are no longer together but called him her 'best friend and the love of my life'

Grimes, born Claire Boucher, and Musk began dating in 2018. In March, the singer said they are no longer together but called him her ‘best friend and the love of my life’

The pair's high profile relationship thrust her into the spotlight in unwanted ways, she said on Lex Fridman's podcast. 'I'm just a random indie musician, but I just got dragged into geopolitical matters and financial - like the stock market and s***'

The pair’s high profile relationship thrust her into the spotlight in unwanted ways, she said on Lex Fridman’s podcast. ‘I’m just a random indie musician, but I just got dragged into geopolitical matters and financial – like the stock market and s***’

‘One of the things that’s happening is that, like, it’s alienating people from wanting to care about technology,’ she said. ‘I think we can fix a lot of our problems more easily with technology than with, you know, fighting the powers that be.’

She briefly slammed Twitter for its effect on ‘public mental health,’ but stopped short of criticizing her ex-beau’s purchase of the platform.

‘I do have a lot of thoughts on the matter. If my thoughts are wrong, this is one situation where the stakes are high,’ she said.

She did, however, describe having multiple burner Twitter accounts to try out different viewpoints.

‘I think we used to exist in a mono-culture, like before social media and stuff, like we kind of all got fed the same thing, so we were all speaking the same cultural language, but I think recently, one of the things that we aren’t diagnosing properly enough with social media is that there’s different dialects,’ she said. 

‘There’s so many different dialects of Chinese, there are now becoming different dialects of English, like I am realizing, like, there are people who are saying the exact same things but they’re using completely different verbiage and we’re, like, punishing each other for not using the correct verbiage. 

‘People are just, like, misunderstanding what the other people are saying.’

In a different segment, the singer-songwriter and producer suggested that her fame has gotten out of control.   

She stopped short of criticizing her ex-beau's purchase of the platform. 'I do have a lot of thoughts on the matter. If my thoughts are wrong, this is one situation where the stakes are high,' she said

She stopped short of criticizing her ex-beau’s purchase of the platform. ‘I do have a lot of thoughts on the matter. If my thoughts are wrong, this is one situation where the stakes are high,’ she said

‘I feel like the public perception of me has gotten so distorted that I find it kind of disturbing. It’s one of the things that’s disincentivizing me from, like, wanting to keep making art because i’m just like, I’ve completely lost control of the narrative.’

She hinted that some of the change may have come about during her high-profile relationship with Musk, who is worth a reported $246.2 billion.

‘I know I kind of got in over my head in things. I’m just a random indie musician, but I just got dragged into geopolitical matters and financial –  like the stock market and s***. 

‘There are very powerful people who have at various points in time had a very vested interest in making me seem insane, and i can’t f****** fight that.

‘I’m like, artificially more famous than I should be.’

She added: ‘I cannot be media trained. They have put me through so many hours of media training.’ 

Twitter announced that it had finalized a deal to let itself be bought by Musk for $44 billion last week.

Musk, founder of SpaceX and Tesla, called for his 'worst critics' to remain on the platform because 'that is what free speech means.' But within the company, there was turmoil after the announcement

Musk, founder of SpaceX and Tesla, called for his ‘worst critics’ to remain on the platform because ‘that is what free speech means.’ But within the company, there was turmoil after the announcement

The 50-year-old founder of SpaceX and Tesla called for his ‘worst critics’ to remain on the platform because ‘that is what free speech means’. 

He said : ‘Free speech is the bedrock of a functioning democracy, and Twitter is the digital town square where matters vital to the future of humanity are debated.

‘I also want to make Twitter better than ever by enhancing the product with new features, making the algorithms open source to increase trust, defeating the spam bots, and authenticating all humans.’Twitter has tremendous potential – I look forward to working with the company and the community of users to unlock it.’

But within the company, there was turmoil after the announcement.

Musk is known for using Twitter to clap back at those who criticize him with juvenile humor and insults. 

Additionally, the entrepreneur has allegedly fired staff who have brought up safety issues at Tesla or tried to jumpstart unionization efforts. 

‘I feel like he’s this petulant little boy and that he’s doing this to troll…he doesn’t know anything about our policies and what we do…his statement about our algo was f****** insane… 

‘Were just gonna let everyone run amok?…nobody knows,’ one employee said, according to the New York Times.

Some Twitter staff were ‘openly rebelling’ against Musk, one observer noted, posting a screen shot of Twitter’s official Github site and posting a public response entitled ‘The Algorithm’, with zero code. 

On Friday, comedian Bill Maher slammed Twitter for flagging a tweet by satire site Babylon Bee, which posted a skit about the social media network’s workers needing therapy after Musk’s takeover. 

‘You do need a new sheriff,’ the Real Time host said on his show. 

Maher backed Elon Musk to turn Twitter into a 'town square' of thoughts and opinions rather than a 'left wing place.' The comedian said that Twitter was a place for people who want their news to reflect their politics

Maher backed Elon Musk to turn Twitter into a ‘town square’ of thoughts and opinions rather than a ‘left wing place.’ The comedian said that Twitter was a place for people who want their news to reflect their politics

‘This is well within what satire has always been.’ 

Maher backed Musk to turn Twitter into a ‘town square’ of thoughts and opinions rather than a ‘left wing place.’ The comedian said that Twitter was a place for people who want their news to reflect their politics. 

Maher then took aim at President Barack Obama’s opinion that Generation Z would figure out how to combat misinformation was way wrong.   

 ‘I’d much rather have Elon Musk making the rules that a 23-year-old who can’t take the joke on Babylon Beeswax, or whatever the f*** that is,’ he said.

‘I mean, this is a generation that doesn’t know what the word ‘violence’ means. They think ‘violence’ means ‘anything I don’t like.’ Their standard of free speech is ‘I’m uncomfortable.’ That’s not where the standard is, right?’ 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk