Gold Coast mother forces eshay son on flight to New Zealand to escape juvenile crime


Desperate mother ‘KIDNAPS’ her son and flies him out of Australia to save him from deadly culture sweeping the country

  • Mother forced to put her son on a flight to New Zealand to escape eshay gangs
  • Laura said her son, 13, had joined an eshay gang on Gold Coast six weeks ago
  • He had already stolen a car, sped down a highway and been caught with drugs 

A mother has been forced to fly her son to New Zealand to escape the growing eshay culture in Australia.

Laura* was left fearing for her son’s life after he joined an eshay gang on the Gold Coast six weeks ago.

He has stolen cars, sped down the M1 Pacific Motorway at 200km/h and, worst of all, posted the incriminating footage to social media to brag to his friends.

‘He’d gone missing three times, had stolen countless times, was in a car crash with three other teens wrapped around a tree, has had drugs on him … it’s a relief to finally do something,’ Laura told Gold Coast Bulletin. 

A mother has been forced to fly her son to New Zealand to escape the growing eshay culture in Australia (pictured, an eshay takes a hit from an improvised bong)

Laura* was left fearing for her son's life after he joined an eshay gang on the Gold Coast six weeks ago

Laura* was left fearing for her son’s life after he joined an eshay gang on the Gold Coast six weeks ago

The mother said she was left with no choice but to pack his suitcase and put him on a flight out of the country.

Laura and her partner have used the equity in their house to fund the abrupt move. 

‘Any mother would do anything to save her kids, but I knew I couldn’t stop him,’ she said.

‘So last week we got him on a plane to New Zealand, it’s the only way to break this cycle.’

Laura said her son was reluctant to go and that three family members had to force him onto a connecting flight to Melbourne.

He was then forced to stay with family at an AirbnB until his passport was processed by authorities and he was allowed to fly to New Zealand.

Laura said her son comes from a stable home with no bullying or trauma in the family.

She doesn’t understand how her son has been pulled into the dark underbelly of juvenile crime and deliquency.

Laura said she would have relocated her son to a different city, but feared he would be dragged into another eshay gang.

The rise of the eshay is striking fear into middle-class parents worried their children want to emulate a dangerous subculture and fall into a life of crime

The rise of the eshay is striking fear into middle-class parents worried their children want to emulate a dangerous subculture and fall into a life of crime

Eshay or lad culture is said to have spread from Sydney's inner-city graffiti scene in the 1980s through Housing Commission estates and out into the suburbs

Eshay or lad culture is said to have spread from Sydney’s inner-city graffiti scene in the 1980s through Housing Commission estates and out into the suburbs

She said police could only do so much and that she had sent her son to see a psychiatrist, but had no luck. 

The rise of the eshay is striking fear into middle-class parents worried their children want to emulate a dangerous subculture and fall into a life of crime.

Eshay or lad culture is said to have spread from Sydney’s inner-city graffiti scene in the 1980s through Housing Commission estates and out into the suburbs.

Hard-core eshays engage in assaults, robberies and threatening behaviour against other youths but many seem to wander the streets and hang around train stations aimlessly.

Where eshays – also known as lads – once predominantly came from disadvantaged backgrounds their ethos and pig latin slang is now more mainstream and widely promoted on social media, and are found even in the wealthiest suburbs. 

*name changed for privacy  

Hard-core eshays engage in assaults, robberies and threatening behaviour against other youths but many seem to wander the streets and hang around train stations aimlessly

Hard-core eshays engage in assaults, robberies and threatening behaviour against other youths but many seem to wander the streets and hang around train stations aimlessly

Where eshays - also known as lads - once predominantly came from disadvantaged backgrounds their ethos and pig latin slang is now more mainstream and widely promoted on social media, and are found even in the wealthiest suburbs (pictured, a popular meme about the trend)

Where eshays – also known as lads – once predominantly came from disadvantaged backgrounds their ethos and pig latin slang is now more mainstream and widely promoted on social media, and are found even in the wealthiest suburbs (pictured, a popular meme about the trend)

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