Ghislaine Maxwell juror says evidence convinced panel she was a ‘predator’


A juror in the Ghislaine Maxwell trial has revealed how the jury viewed her as a ‘predator’ and claimed that she ‘might have seemed more human’ if she had taken the stand in her own defense.

Scotty David was one of the 12 men and women who convicted Maxwell on five of the six counts of sex-trafficking last week.

Now, speaking to DailyMail.com, he has recalled how he ‘locked eyes’ with Maxwell in court, admitted that he felt sympathy for the woman about whom he knew nothing before the trial and revealed the tensions and frustrations through which the jury worked across five days of intense deliberations.

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Scotty, who spoke on condition that only his first and middle names are used, said he went into the trial firmly believing that Maxwell was ‘innocent until proven guilty’ and viewing the victims with a skeptical eye

During the trial Scotty, who works in finance, was seated in the third row of the jury box, in the back corner. From his vantage point, he said, he had a vista of the entire court and the ¿perfect view¿ of Maxwell herself

During the trial Scotty, who works in finance, was seated in the third row of the jury box, in the back corner. From his vantage point, he said, he had a vista of the entire court and the ‘perfect view’ of Maxwell herself

Scotty David, (pictured) a juror in the Ghislaine Maxwell trial, was one of the 12 men and women who convicted Maxwell on five of the six counts of sex-trafficking last week

Scotty David, (pictured) a juror in the Ghislaine Maxwell trial, was one of the 12 men and women who convicted Maxwell on five of the six counts of sex-trafficking last week

According to Scotty, who spoke on condition that only his first and middle names are used, he went into the trial firmly believing that Maxwell was ‘innocent until proven guilty’ and viewing the victims with a skeptical eye.

But, he said, ‘After all I’ve learned, she’s just as guilty as Epstein. I don’t want to call her a monster, but a predator is the right word.  

‘She knew what was happening. She knew what Epstein was doing and she allowed it to happen. She participated in getting these girls comfortable so that he could have his way with them.

‘And, to me, them returning repeatedly for the money has nothing to do with anything because these girls were minors, and it doesn’t matter what incentivized them. It matters what happened to them.’

During the trial Scotty, who works in finance, was seated in the third row of the jury box, in the back corner. From his vantage point, he said, he had a vista of the entire court and the ‘perfect view’ of Maxwell herself.

He recalled, ‘I could literally see her [all the time]. There were times when it felt like she was staring right at me and we would lock eyes…it didn’t feel real.’

Scotty recalled looking directly at Maxwell, ¿I could literally see her [all the time]. There were times when it felt like she was staring right at me and we would lock eyes¿it didn¿t feel real'

Scotty recalled looking directly at Maxwell, ‘I could literally see her [all the time]. There were times when it felt like she was staring right at me and we would lock eyes…it didn’t feel real’

Scotty is completely satisfied that they reached the right verdict and that, with Maxwell¿s conviction, justice has been done. He says that he believes she will spend the rest of her life in prison unless a deal is done

Scotty is completely satisfied that they reached the right verdict and that, with Maxwell’s conviction, justice has been done. He says that he believes she will spend the rest of her life in prison unless a deal is done

Scotty said that Maxwell¿s manner in court was discussed during deliberations. He said, ¿We did discuss that we thought she was a little standoffish and not necessarily cold, more like she was paying attention'

Scotty said that Maxwell’s manner in court was discussed during deliberations. He said, ‘We did discuss that we thought she was a little standoffish and not necessarily cold, more like she was paying attention’

‘She was constantly taking notes, and constantly passing post-it notes over to her attorneys especially when they were on cross examination.’

At times, he said, ‘I felt like she was watching what we were doing because there were times when some jurors, not during when the victims presented their testimony, but when certain other people presented on things that maybe they didn’t feel mattered…some people would nod off.’

Scotty said that Maxwell’s manner in court was discussed during deliberations. He said, ‘We did discuss that we thought she was a little standoffish and not necessarily cold, more like she was paying attention.’

In an insight that will surely come as a gut blow to Maxwell herself, who reportedly wanted to testify but was advised against it, Scotty revealed that if she had taken the stand, ‘It would have shown maybe that she was a little more human.

‘Maybe if she gave her version of the story, who knows, maybe if she gave us a story of how she was manipulated…I don’t know. But then that would have been an admission I feel like of guilt.’

Jurors were instructed not to draw any inference of guilt or otherwise from Maxwell’s decision not to testify and, Scotty said, it was simply set to one side and not discussed during deliberations.

Asked if, at any stage, he had experienced any sympathy for Maxwell he said, ‘Absolutely. Because this is the rest of her life, right? We were deciding what happens based off the evidence provided.

‘We took that very seriously because we took at as, this could be our sister, our sister could be on trial here. We have to really comb through the evidence and make sure we have enough proof to say that she’s either guilty or not.’

The jury was sent out with a daunting 80 pages of instructions after a trial that was often dizzying in detail with lengthy testimony from the victims alone, and six counts to consider.

At first, Scotty admitted, jurors struggled to know where to start or how to make any progress at all.

He said that they did not take an initial vote of opinions but instead, on the first day they were sent out simply chose a foreperson and began by reading the instructions page by page.

He said, ‘It was overwhelming. I mean 80 pages of how you interpret the law on each count, and it flips back and forth between different pages, and you have to flip 20 pages in order to get a definition of something else that can apply to one specific count.’

Maxwell (pictured with Epstein) faced six counts relating to sex trafficking which centered on the stories of four victims

Maxwell (pictured with Epstein) faced six counts relating to sex trafficking which centered on the stories of four victims

Scotty revealed that he was not the only juror to share a story of sexual abuse and that it did not affect his ability to view Maxwell as innocent until proven guilty

Scotty revealed that he was not the only juror to share a story of sexual abuse and that it did not affect his ability to view Maxwell as innocent until proven guilty

Maxwell faced six counts relating to sex trafficking which centered on the stories of four victims.

A fifth victim, Kate, was called only to show a pattern of grooming behavior and was not directly implicated in any of the counts.

At first jurors struggled to agree, Scotty said, over the legal definitions of terms such as ‘enticing.’

He said, ‘It was super confusing. It didn’t get heated. It was just confusing, and when people are confused, tones can get raised. Nobody ever yelled at other people. People would just speak, sounding frustrated.

‘So, we [realized] we had to come up with a new game plan and that game plan was, we’re going to talk to each other with compassion.’

That sea-change came, Scotty said, when he chose to share his own experience of sexual abuse with the room which, he recalled, ‘went silent’ when he did.

It has since been speculated that the fact that a juror was a victim of sexual abuse could be used by Maxwell as grounds of appeal.

However, the question of whether a potential juror was a victim of sexual abuse or a relative or friend of a victim was asked in the 50-question questionnaire completed by each juror ahead of selection.

Scotty could not remember that question when asked by DailyMail.com but was certain that he had answered all questions honestly.

He also revealed that he was not the only juror to share a story of sexual abuse and that it did not affect his ability to view Maxwell as innocent until proven guilty.

It did, however, he believes give him access to a better understanding of the testimony of victims.

To that end, he said, the defense’s tactic of ‘going hard’ on the victims did not play well with him or other jurors.

Scotty pointed to defense attorney Laura Menninger’s use of air-quotes when questioning Jane about her story of ‘escaping’ Epstein at one point.

He said, ‘Everything, her tone, using air-quotes with escape…I think she was acting in order to convince us that this girl’s lying and lying for money.’

Instead, he said, all it did was convince jurors that the defense team were showing a complete lack of respect for the victims.

He said, ‘I just felt terrible I’m like, “I can’t believe you’re treating this woman like this.” Like even if she’s lying there’s better ways to go about it…I don’t feel attacking them that way or degrading her based on what she said was the way to go.’

According to Scotty once the jurors had found a way to ‘understand’ each other they worked methodically through each count starting with count 2.

This was the only charge on which they did not convict Maxwell and related to the charge of ‘enticing’ Jane to travel for sexual exploitation.

An initial vote saw 7 jurors vote guilty and 5 not guilty. Those ‘not guilty’ votes turned to ‘not sure’ on further discussion. Ultimately, he said, it was not a question of Jane’s credibility but rather the fact that they simply did not feel the evidence was there to meet the necessary bar of beyond reasonable doubt.

Working through each charge jurors wrote out lists of evidence on a white board and attached post-it notes as they built the case for each as they saw it and deliberated towards consensus.

On counts two and four – both relating to Jane – there was a 7/5 split of guilty/not sure. On counts one, three and five – all conspiracy charges – there was a 10/2 guilty/not sure split and on count six, the sex trafficking charge relating to Carolyn, all voted guilty from the start.

Scotty said he never felt pressure from either the judge or the rest of the jurors to reach a verdict. In fact, he said, when the judge sent a note on Wednesday 29 December informing them that if they had not reached a verdict she would recall them the following day, they were about to send her a note saying they had reached consensus on all counts.

Today Scotty is completely satisfied that they reached the right verdict and that, with Maxwell’s conviction, justice has been done.

He says that he believes she will spend the rest of her life in prison unless a deal is done to reduce her sentence. But said that he had no idea of the severity of the potential sentence until after the verdict was reached and that it would not have influenced anything if he had.

He said, ‘It satisfies me to know that we did our due diligence and that we brought justice for these victims, for these girls who are now women.’

He said that, ultimately, he and the rest of the jurors were convinced that Epstein and Maxwell’s lives were so ‘intertwined’ that it was inconceivable that she was not fully aware of his crimes.

She aided and abetted, he said. And with her conviction she wasn’t paying or being held accountable for Epstein’s crimes as her attorneys have argued, Scotty said, instead she was answering to her own guilt because she was ‘every bit as culpable’ as he.

According to Scotty, ‘The prosecution proved their case beyond reasonable doubt.’

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