Ferrari patent reveals its supercars will growl when it goes electric


Ferraris will still growl even when they run on batteries: Supercar legend files patent to boom electric drivetrain sounds out via external speakers

  • Italian car brand’s patent for enhancing performance EV sounds revealed
  • It will record genuine sounds from the electric motors and other components
  • These are pumped out from a ‘sound reproduction device’ at the back of cars

Even when they switch to battery power, Ferrari supercars would continue to make a booming sound if a patent filed by the Italian firm is used in its electric vehicles of the future.

The Maranello-based car maker’s plans have been exposed by design drawings filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office, which were first spotted by CarBuzz.

They suggest the iconic brand wants to take the authentic sounds created by the powerful electric motors driving its plug-in models, then enhance them and pump the noise out via external speakers.

Ferraris to rumble on into electric future: The Italian supercar brand appears to be developing a system than enhances the soundtrack of its battery-powered models 

The Maranello-based car maker's plans have been exposed by design drawings filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office, which were first spotted by CarBuzz

The Maranello-based car maker’s plans have been exposed by design drawings filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office, which were first spotted by CarBuzz

Ferrari has teased that it will release its first fully electric car as early as 2025, and by the end of the decade it foresees 40 per cent of its vehicle sales being entirely battery powered. 

For many enthusiasts and supercar collectors, the transition away from the thunderous symphony of the company’s V8 and V12 powerplants will be a sad moment indeed.

However, Ferraris of the future could still create a stirring soundtrack, if the Italian firm is to go ahead with these patent plans.

The drawings show that the brand will not try to replicate the engine noises we’ve come to know and love but enhance the genuine tone created by its battery-powered drivetrains.

CarBuzz says the system filed would extrapolate the hum generated by the electric motors and other components, record this and then amplify the notes via a ‘sound reproduction device’ – or external speaker – mounted on the rear axle so it pumps out like it would an exhaust on a combustion engine car.

By creating a 'genuine' sound, electric Ferraris will continue to adhere to the brand's strict ethos of authenticity

By creating a ‘genuine’ sound, electric Ferraris will continue to adhere to the brand’s strict ethos of authenticity

It means the sound an electric Ferrari makes when passing people in the street will directly correlate with the speed of which the drivetrain is operating and how vigorously the owner is stamping on the throttle.

This will create a ‘genuine powertrain’ noise, rather than a synthesised soundtrack that almost all EVs have today.

The system will therefore meet Ferrari’s strict ethos of authenticity and continue to provide customers with luxury vehicles that sound as exciting as they look and perform. 

It’s a completely different take on what Ferrari’s smaller Italian sibling is doing with its first electric performance model.

The electric Abarth 500e has a powerful 42 kWh battery. But to make it sound more exciting, the car uses speakers to reproduce the rumble of a high-performance petrol engine

The electric Abarth 500e has a powerful 42 kWh battery. But to make it sound more exciting, the car uses speakers to reproduce the rumble of a high-performance petrol engine

Abarth – the sporty arm of Fiat – has recently unveiled its hot 500e, which is powered by a 42kWh battery. But to make it more enticing to sportscar customers, it develops an artificial ‘roar’ using a sound generator feature which reproduces the rumble of its traditional combustion engines.

The company said: ‘The new Abarth 500e is the first and only city car that can be equipped with the Sound Generator, for those who don’t want to give up on Abarth’s signature – the unmistakable Abarth ‘roar’.

‘The Sound Generator accompanies the engine performance, faithfully reproducing the sound of an Abarth petrol engine.’

Other brands have taken a slightly different approach to the sounds their EVs produce.

BMW, for example, has employed famed composer Hans Zimmer to formulate a soundtracks for its EVs.

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