Ex On The Beach star Jess Impiazzi is rushed to hospital with heart palpitations amid ongoing battle with chronic illness

Jess Impiazzi was rushed to hospital on Wednesday as she continues her battle with chronic illness Lupus. 

The star, 34, was diagnosed with the chronic illness after doctors ran tests and she began coughing up blood while fearing she was dying. 

Giving fans an update on her latest plight, the model and actress revealed she had suffered heart palpitations leading to a hospital dash for X-rays and an ECG (electrocardiogram) to assess her heart’s activity. 

Taking to Instagram, she penned: ‘OK little update and thanks for anyone messaging me. I’ve had X-Rays on my lungs and bloods done and had ECG because of my heart palpitations, now waiting in hospital…

‘Thank you to the Lupus community you are amazing.’

Jess Impiazzi was rushed to hospital on Wednesday as she continues her battle with chronic illness Lupus

The star, 34, was diagnosed with the chronic illness after doctors ran tests and she began coughing up blood while fearing she was dying

The star, 34, was diagnosed with the chronic illness after doctors ran tests and she began coughing up blood while fearing she was dying

Earlier this year, Jess explained how she experienced debilitating stomach issues, muscle spasms, swelling joints which left her unable to move, extreme fatigue, worsening eyesight and a rash all over her face, chest and arms. 

After three trips to A&E in July, and ‘many, many’ tests, the actress – who is dating Jermaine Pennant – was finally told by doctors that she suffers with Lupus and is now on steroids ‘to get it under control’.

Jess – who recently endured a failed round of IVF – has explained how she believes the boob job she had in December, to replace a ruptured breast implant, is what has caused the serious decline in her health.

Taking to Instagram on Sunday, Jess shared photographs of her rash-covered face and told fans what she’d been going through.

She penned: ‘A lot has been going on here since the start of the year!… I don’t know where to begin!…

Obviously I was very open with the IVF journey and the process, but during that time and pretty much since early January I had been getting sicker and sicker, this was with inflammation, stomach issues that were debilitating…

‘As the months rolled on I’d have muscle spasms, my joints would swell and I’d be unable to move my entire body, my eyesight got worse, the fatigue was something and is still something I’ve never experienced before….

‘From being in the gym nearly everyday and running 5k’s this has just been horrid. Then I got rashes all over my chest arms and face (I’ve learnt how to cover them well with make up, but without it it’s horrible down my nose and my whole forehead)…

Revealing all: Jess shared the news to Instagram in a lengthy post caption

Revealing all: Jess shared the news to Instagram in a lengthy post caption

‘In July I had three trips to A&E from the pain, I just knew I was getting worse and I was really struggling! Mentally it’s taken a toll, if the IVF and that failing wasn’t hard enough this was topping it off!

‘After many, many tests and lots of blood taken I was diagnosed with a chronic autoimmune disease called Lupus.

‘I am currently on steroids to get this under control and then see what the future holds medication wise but having a diagnosis helps as I can now work with the doctors to get myself living again and do whatever it takes to keep my body in the best working condition!

‘I’ve had amazing friends and family supporting me! (You know who you are!) I’m looking in to something’s as to why it’s happened and what may have caused it although it’s hard for doctors to establish that, however I did have an operation late December last year that I feel may be linked. (I’ll talk about this in detail once I know more)

‘If anyone has autoimmune issues especially lupus please reach out and let me know ways that may have helped you!

Candid: Jess explained how she experienced debilitating stomach issues, muscle spasms, swelling joints which left her unable to move and a rash all over her face, chest and arms

Candid: Jess explained how she experienced debilitating stomach issues, muscle spasms, swelling joints which left her unable to move and a rash all over her face, chest and arms

‘Anyways… that’s what’s been going on lately and have felt a little bit lost but I’m finding my feet again! I’ll bounce back with tweaks and get the show back on the road! peace and love to everyone.’

Speaking to The Sun, Jess explained how her crippling symptoms started in January, one month after she had her breast implants replaced because one ruptured.

She said: ‘One day I started coughing up blood, which was incredibly scary… I know there is a lot of controversy around breast implant illness but I was healthy before this rupture.

‘I had the new ones put in and my health has been dropping until every bodily function has been attacked by my own system. The one thing that’s changed is my breasts.

‘My consultant said that there is a link between silicone and autoimmune diseases. Why else would my body start attacking itself?’

Jess also told the publication that she now set a date to have her breast implants removed, and said: ‘I’m not prepared for any more of my body to go down. Living like this is not a life. It’s hard.’

Jess also told the publication that she now set a date to have her breast implants removed, and said: 'I'm not prepared for any more of my body to go down. Living like this is not a life. It's hard.'

Jess also told the publication that she now set a date to have her breast implants removed, and said: ‘I’m not prepared for any more of my body to go down. Living like this is not a life. It’s hard.’ 

WHAT IS LUPUS?

What is lupus?

It is one of the chronic autoimmune conditions, where the body makes antibodies against itself and starts to attack it. Lupus – Systemic Lupus Erythematotsus (SLE) – has a range of severity. Some sufferers will have only mild problems, others have life-threatening organ damage to the heart and the kidneys.

What are the symptoms?

Tiredness, joint pains and muscle aches. A common first symptom is joint stiffness, particularly in the mornings. Skin and hair problems are a major feature of SLE – a rash in the shape of a butterfly over the cheeks and nose is common, as is hair loss and sensitivity to the sun. Other problems include depression and lung and heart disease, as well as kidney inflammation.

What can it be mistaken for?

It is often mistaken for other joint problems such as rheumatoid arthritis which is also characterised by morning joint stiffness. It can also be misdiagnosed as a skin or blood disease.

How is it diagnosed?

If your GP suspects SLE they will request a blood test. The specific antibodies that attack the body can be measured in the blood. The diagnosis is made when there is the combination of typical symptoms and high antibodies.

Who is at risk?

SLE is ten times more common in women than men and usually develops between the ages 12 and 25.

What is the treatment?

Controlling the symptoms, as there is no cure, using anti-inflammatories and steroid tablets in more severe cases. 

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