Dietitian reveals why your ‘healthy’ breakfast choices might be making you put on weight 


Why you SHOULD eat toast for breakfast: Dietitian reveals why your ‘healthy’ choices might be behind your weight gain

  • Savina, or The Savvy Dietitian, from Perth, said we should allow ourselves bread
  • The dietitian said all too often she sees clients ‘demonise’ it in favour of muesli
  • But often, muesli has the same if not more calories than two pieces of toast 
  • Savina’s aim is to bust common nutrition myths and promote balanced diets

A dietitian has revealed why you shouldn’t demonise carbohydrates and particularly bread when you’re on a healthy diet. 

Savina – also known as The Savvy Dietitian – from Perth, said she hears people all too often say they are going to ‘cut or restrict’ bread and swap it out for muesli or granola in the morning.

But often, a ‘healthy’ bowl of muesli ends up having more carbs and calories than a couple of pieces of toast. 

A dietitian has revealed why you shouldn’t demonise carbohydrates and particularly bread when you’re on a healthy diet (Savina pictured)

Savina - also known as The Savvy Dietitian - from Perth, said she hears people all too often say they are going to 'cut or restrict' bread and swap it out for muesli or granola in the morning, but this isn't always healthier (the comparison pictured)

Savina – also known as The Savvy Dietitian – from Perth, said she hears people all too often say they are going to ‘cut or restrict’ bread and swap it out for muesli or granola in the morning, but this isn’t always healthier (the comparison pictured)

‘This is a friendly reminder to STOP demonising and restricting bread, as it can most definitely be incorporated into a heathy balanced diet,’ Savina posted on her Instagram page.  

She said that you are often having the ‘equivalent of what bread provides in terms of calories’, but just in a different form.

The dietitian illustrated her point by way of a comparison picture comparing 130 grams of muesli to five slices of wholegrain bread.

Savina said both contain 70 grams of carbohydrates, but while the muesli has 622 calories, the five pieces of bread has just 490 calories.

She said you shouldn't assume just because you are buying sushi that it is better for you than having a sandwich with a healthy protein and vegetable filling (another comparison pictured)

She said you shouldn’t assume just because you are buying sushi that it is better for you than having a sandwich with a healthy protein and vegetable filling (another comparison pictured)

‘Whether it’s multigrain, sourdough, ezekiel, sandwich thins, low or lower carb, or wholemeal wholegrain, don’t be afraid to add grainy bread into your diet,’ Savina said. 

‘People have such a fear of the carbohydrate content of bread… yet they don’t realise how it compares to other foods that provide carbohydrates.

‘I LOVE showing people bread is in fact okay especially when a sandwich (two slices of preferably wholegrain) with protein and salad is a filling option!’

What is the nutritional breakdown of one slice of wholegrain bread? 

* Calories: 98

* Protein: 5.1 grams

* Fat: 1.7 grams

* Carbs: 14 grams

* Fibre: 2.65 grams

depends on the brand and type of bread 

Source: The Savvy Dietitian 

What is the nutritional breakdown of muesli per 100 grams?

* Calories: 482

* Protein: 10.8 grams

* Fat: 23.4 grams

* Carbs: 54.2 grams

* Fibre: 5.7 grams

depends on the brand and type of muesli 

Source: The Savvy Dietitian 

In the past, the Perth expert shared the difference between serving size (a standard amount of food) and portion size (how much we often give ourselves when dishing out food) - (pictured)

In the past, the Perth expert shared the difference between serving size (a standard amount of food) and portion size (how much we often give ourselves when dishing out food) – (pictured)

Thousands who saw the dietitian’s post were quick to say that their minds had been ‘blown’ by the information.

‘This is a game changer. I can’t believe I’m only learning this now,’ one commenter posted.

Another added: ‘This is so interesting and true, especially when you take into account how much sugar is added into granola and muesli’. 

Savina (pictured) is known for busting common nutrition myths, as well as promoting anti-fad diets and helping people create healthy habits without restrictions

Savina (pictured) is known for busting common nutrition myths, as well as promoting anti-fad diets and helping people create healthy habits without restrictions

Savina is known for busting common nutrition myths, as well as promoting anti-fad diets and helping people create healthy habits without restrictions.

In the past, the Perth expert has shared the difference between serving size (a standardised amount of food) and portion size (how much we often give ourselves when dishing out food).

‘Before cutting out food groups or restricting foods, understand what you are consuming first!’ she said.  



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