Coronavirus device Nanowave kills virus by zapping it with UV light 


Dynamics, an electronics firm, unveiled a coronavirus killing machine that sucks up germs and blasts them with high-intensity ultraviolet light.

Called Nanowave, the technology is capable of eliminating 99 percent of the virus in less than two thousandths of a second.

The device consists of four motors that pulls air in at up to 300 liters and is capable of pushing the coronavirus free air more than 10 feet away from the system.

Dynamics also designed the ‘world’s first’ fully flexible UV-C lamp that is physically contorted in the device to provide ultra-high intensity UV-C radiation.

Nanowave is available for purchase in the US for $3,450 per unit.

Dynamics, an electronics firm, unveiled a coronavirus killing machine that sucks up germs and blasts them with high-intensity ultraviolet light. The firm says its device, called Nanowave, could be uses in office spaces

The team conducted lab testing with the University of Texas, Medical Branch and Colorado State University where it achieved inactivation of 99.99907 percent.

Elias Towe, a Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, said: ‘Dynamics has created one of the first viable tools for inactivating the COVID-19 virus.’

‘The performance of the device, as measured at major US laboratories, is impressive.’

‘What is remarkable is that Dynamics modified some of their unique know-how in flexible microelectronic techniques and merged these with emerging UV-C light technologies to produce intensities sufficient to inactivate the virus.’

Once the air is zapped, the device pushes out inactivated air at different speeds based on the number of devices that are in a single space. The technology is capable of eliminating 99 percent of the virus in less than two thousandths of a second

Once the air is zapped, the device pushes out inactivated air at different speeds based on the number of devices that are in a single space. The technology is capable of eliminating 99 percent of the virus in less than two thousandths of a second

The device consists of four motors that pulls air in at up to 300 liters and is capable of pushing the coronavirus free air more than 10 feet away from the system

The device consists of four motors that pulls air in at up to 300 liters and is capable of pushing the coronavirus free air more than 10 feet away from the system

The coronavirus began in Wuhan, China last year and quickly spread to nearly every country in the world.

Scientists and companies have since been working around the clock to uncover ways at keeping the virus at bay.

When the outbreak first started, reports surfaced saying ultraviolet light could eliminate the coronavirus, but, without the proper testing, many experts were hesitant to adopt it as an effective method.

Jeff Mullen, Dynamics founder and CEO, said: ‘When we started on this journey, people didn’t even believe UV-C would inactivate the COVID-19 virus as it had never been done before.’

‘We had to perform numerous experiments with top US labs with the COVID-19 virus to find the best operating methodologies to inactivate the virus for different types of applications. And, even after we inactivated the COVID-19 virus, experts didn’t believe the amount and type of UV radiation needed for fast air applications was even plausible.’

Nanowave Air may also provide inactivated air continuously to a single person, as the device may be pointed directly at a person in order to provide them with a constant stream of inactivated air

Nanowave Air may also provide inactivated air continuously to a single person, as the device may be pointed directly at a person in order to provide them with a constant stream of inactivated air

Once the air is zapped, the device pushes out inactivated air at different speeds based on the number of devices that are in a single space.

‘This may be particular useful for certain reception areas, office spaces, retail spaces, bathrooms, elevators, meeting rooms, and even vehicles, Dynamics shared in a statement. 

‘For large spaces, or faster processing times, additional units may need to be deployed.’

Nanowave Air may also provide inactivated air continuously to a single person, as the device may be pointed directly at a person in order to provide them with a constant stream of inactivated air.

The firm sees this method being used in dental offices, doctor offices, aesthetic salons, check-out lines and cubicles.

Dynamics has conducted over 80 experiments with its device against the coronavirus in liquid, on surfaces and in the air.

In May, it achieved what is said to be the first documented inactivation of the virus with ultraviolet type C radiation.

Dynamics has conducted over 80 experiments with its device against the coronavirus in liquid, on surfaces and in the air. In May, it achieved what is said to be the first documented inactivation of the virus with ultraviolet type C radiation

Dynamics has conducted over 80 experiments with its device against the coronavirus in liquid, on surfaces and in the air. In May, it achieved what is said to be the first documented inactivation of the virus with ultraviolet type C radiation

The firm has since received certification from the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) certification, Edison Testing Laboratories (ETL), and Conformite Europeene (CE). As certified by ETL, all UV-C is contained in the device. 

With these certifications, Nanowave Air meets the electrical and safety criteria needed to launch in numerous countries, the company said.

‘We have this unique vantage point because of technologies we’re comfortable with and we use every day,’ Mullen said. 

‘It has the opportunity to be really meaningful. Of all of the ideas, this was the application that we could get to the market first and make a difference.’

HOW LONG ARE COVID-19 PATIENTS CONTAGIOUS AND WHAT MAKES THEM INFECTIOUS?

By Natalie Rahhal, US Health Editor  

It may take anywhere from three to 14 days after someone is exposed to coronavirus for symptoms to show up. 

The average person will develop symptoms within four to five days. 

It’s now clear that a person can spread coronavirus before they actually show any signs of having the illness. 

Most research now suggests that can start happening between 48 and 72 hours before their symptoms begin. 

A COVID-19 patient becomes infectious to others once the virus has made enough copies to give them a higher viral load, meaning there is a sufficiently significant concentration of virus genome in their mucus and saliva to potentially spread it. 

When an infected person coughs or sneezes, they spray droplets into the air, and these droplets can be be inhaled by others. 

Pinning down exactly how early someone becomes contagious, when they are at their peak infectiousness, and when they are no longer contagious is extremely difficult. 

Many studies suggest that people most infectious right around the time their symptoms start. A handful have found people were actually most infectious in the 48 hours before they become contagious, according to Harvard University.  

That early infectious period is part of why coronavirus is so hard to control: People cna spread the disease before they know they have it. 

And the infectious period lasts a long time. Most scientists think that viral shedding continues for about 10 days after symptoms start in mild to moderate cases, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

But some more severely ill people stay infectious for up to 20 days. 

Large virus-containing droplets expelled when coronavirus patients cough or sneeze are still thought to be the primary mode of transmission. 

That means that being symptomatic makes someone more likely to spread the disease. 

CDC officials have now confirmed the virus can spread in fine particles, too, acknowledging how it is transmitted even by people with no symptoms.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk