Cat born with four ears and has finally found a home 


I can hear you purrrfectly! Meet one-year-old rescue cat Aslan who was born with four ears and has finally found a home

  • Aslan the cat was born with four ears, a rare recessive gene found in felines
  • Owner Sawti Komanduri, 41, helped rescue him and 14 siblings last year
  •  ‘I am so happy to have the privilege to care for him,’ Komanduri said
  •  Despite anomaly, Aslan enjoys everyday life with doting owner and fellow pets

An adorable rescue cat who was born with four ears was finally adopted by a Pennsylvania woman. 

Aslan, the one-year-old domestic shorthair mix, sports an extra pair of ears on his head, which sit just behind his first pair. 

His new owner, Swati Komanduri, 41, a financial analyst, adopted Aslan after the group she volunteers for, Animal Safe Haven and Adoptions, rescued the kitten and his siblings from a car repair shop last year. 

Aslan the cat was born with four-ears. He and 14 siblings were rescued last year

The four-eared gene is rare among cat. It is a recessive trait, and two four-eared cats only have a 50% chance of passing it down to their kittens

The four-eared gene is rare among cat. It is a recessive trait, and two four-eared cats only have a 50% chance of passing it down to their kittens

Swati Komanduri, of Pennsylvania, adopted the kitten after rescuing him

Swati Komanduri, of Pennsylvania, adopted the kitten after rescuing him 

She says she feels privileged to be able to take care of and raise the rare feline

She says she feels privileged to be able to take care of and raise the rare feline

Despite his anomaly, Komanduri says the kitten is very playful and enjoys his time around the house

Despite his anomaly, Komanduri says the kitten is very playful and enjoys his time around the house

‘I got a call that 14 kittens were rescued from a colony, Komanduri said. ‘When I went to pick up the new kittens I was told there was a tiny kitten with four ears. 

‘I have never seen a four-eared cat. I didn’t even know about this mutation.’

 The mutation is a rare one. 

According to a 1957 study in the Journal of Heredity, researchers found that the four-eared gene is a rare, recessive gene. A  pair of four-eared cats have about a 50% chance of passing down the trait to their offspring. 

Aslan’s special features have earned him thousands of followers on social media. 

Despite his physical anomaly and mild issues with eating, Aslan has no other issues and lives a very normal life. 

Aslan is a one-year-old domestic shorthair mix

Aslan is a one-year-old domestic shorthair mix

Komanduri noted that the cat loves to eat any and all meals

Komanduri noted that the cat loves to eat any and all meals

His extra eyes are located just behind the first pair

His extra eyes are located just behind the first pair 

Komanduri said Aslan is trained to wear a leash and enjoys walks outside

 Komanduri said Aslan is trained to wear a leash and enjoys walks outside

‘He is a very talkative and social cat,’ Komanduri said. ‘He loves and demands to go for walks. He insists on tasting everything and if isn’t given what he wants for food or treats, he steals it and runs away.’

The doting owner added that the cat enjoys playing with the other pets in the house. 

‘I am so happy to have the privilege to care for him,’ Komanduri said. ‘He is mine forever.’ 

Aslan is very playful and enjoys taking photos for social media

Aslan is very playful and enjoys taking photos for social media

Komanduri said the kitten is in good health following his rescue last year

Komanduri said the kitten is in good health following his rescue last year

 

Aslan also enjoys being carried

Aslan also enjoys being carried 

The doting owner said she would take care of Aslan 'forever'

The doting owner said she would take care of Aslan ‘forever’

Why are some cats born with four ears? 

  • Scientist say the traits is a genetic anomaly tied to smaller eyes and a smaller underbite 
  • It is believed that the mutation is caused when the brain is affected in utero
  • Researchers in 1957 found that the gene is a recessive trait
  • A pair of four-eared cats had only a 50% chance of passing down the trait, making it very rare 
  • While data in the early 20th century indicated that the mutation was lethal in a kitten’s development in the womb, modern four-eared cats have lived relatively healthy lives 

Source: Journal of Heredity and PetMD 

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