Boy, 4, almost dies in accident where METAL STRAW impaled him, puncturing an artery to his neck


A 4-year-old New York boy is counting his blessings after a freak accident caused a metal straw to pierce an artery inside his neck, leaving his doctor father unsure about where the bleeding was coming from or what caused it. 

Charlie DeFraia was sipping on a yogurt through the straw on the porch at his home in East Moriches, a hamlet on the eastern end of Long Island, back in June when he lost balance and fell off the porch. The fall forced the eco-conscious alternative to go through his tongue and into his throat.

The metal straw punctured DeFraia’s carotid artery, which gets oxygen and blood to the brain, but left no external wound.

Crystal DeFraia, Charlie’s mother, ran to her son when Charlie’s 8-year-old sister Madison screamed. 

She told Today: ‘I just saw blood on his face. I assumed he busted his nose or his lip, or bit his tongue. I never could have imagined that it was as serious as it was.’ 

Charlie DeFraia was given a stent graft to fix the punctured artery, which Stony Brook Cerebrovascular Center director Dr. David Fiorella said will recreate a brand new carotid artery inside the old one. He recovered quickly after coming out of a medically-induced coma

Charlie, pictured here with his family (father left, sister Madison and mother right). His mother, Crystal DeFraia, ran to her son when when Madison screamed. She told Today : 'I just saw blood on his face. I assumed he busted his nose or his lip, or bit his tongue. I never could have imagined that it was as serious as it was'

Charlie, pictured here with his family (father left, sister Madison and mother right). His mother, Crystal DeFraia, ran to her son when when Madison screamed. She told Today : ‘I just saw blood on his face. I assumed he busted his nose or his lip, or bit his tongue. I never could have imagined that it was as serious as it was’

Charlie DeFraia (pictured center) was sipping on a yogurt through the straw when the incident happened. DeFraia is shown surrounded by his family (father far left, sister Madison, and mother crystal) and Dr. David Chesler, middle right, and Dr. Richard Scriven, far right, who were on the medical team that saved his life

Charlie DeFraia (pictured center) was sipping on a yogurt through the straw when the incident happened. DeFraia is shown surrounded by his family (father far left, sister Madison, and mother crystal) and Dr. David Chesler, middle right, and Dr. Richard Scriven, far right, who were on the medical team that saved his life

Luckily, Charlie’s father Charles is an internal medicine doctor who immediately recognized the danger his son was in.   

Charles said: ‘It was evident that he was really losing a serious amount of blood, and he actually stopped breathing on me a couple times. I had to protect his airway, and that’s really all I could do at that point.’

Crystal confessed that she thought she was watching her boy die before her very eyes.  

The DeFraias took their son to Stony Brook University Hospital less than a mile away. 

Unfortunately, DeFraia lost balance and fell off the porch, forcing the metal straw to go through his tongue and throat. The little boy is pictured here with his mother, left, father holding him, and Dr. Richard Scriven, far right, one of the doctors who helped save his life

Unfortunately, DeFraia lost balance and fell off the porch, forcing the metal straw to go through his tongue and throat. The little boy is pictured here with his mother, left, father holding him, and Dr. Richard Scriven, far right, one of the doctors who helped save his life

The straw punctured DeFraia's carotid artery, which gets oxygen and blood to the brain

Doctors suggested another five minutes might've killed Charlie and says that people should get rid of metal straws or keep them from use by children

The straw punctured DeFraia’s carotid artery, which gets oxygen and blood to the brain

Crystal DeFraia (pictured right) confessed that she thought she was watching her boy die before her very eyes

Crystal DeFraia (pictured right) confessed that she thought she was watching her boy die before her very eyes

Dr. Richard Scriven, the chief of pediatric trauma at the hospital’s trauma center, said he’d been a surgeon for over 30 years and even he thought it was a lot of blood, noting that Charlie had ‘no measurable blood pressure’.  

No one could figure out what had caused the bleeding until Charlie’s mother suggested the straw from his drink, with Scriven saying that ‘unfortunately totally makes sense’. 

Crystal, who posts photos of her CrossFit endeavors online, may have truly saved her son’s life when they discovered the cause. 

Charlie was given a stent graft to fix the punctured artery, which Stony Brook Cerebrovascular Center director Dr. David Fiorella said will recreate a brand new carotid artery inside the old one. 

He added: ‘In doing that, it not only stopped the bleeding and sealed off the bleeding, but also restored normal blood flow to the right side of Charlie’s brain.’

Scriven said that Fiorella was key in saving Charlie specifically because he’s a ‘wizard with catheters.’  

Charlie spent a week in a medically-induced coma but was eventually released from the hospital in July and is set to start kindergarten next week. The little boy has recovered remarkably. Seen here far left on the porch where the incident occurred with his dad, center, and 8-year-old sister Madison

Charlie spent a week in a medically-induced coma but was eventually released from the hospital in July and is set to start kindergarten next week. The little boy has recovered remarkably. Seen here far left on the porch where the incident occurred with his dad, center, and 8-year-old sister Madison

Charlie spent a week in a medically-induced coma but was eventually released from the hospital in July and is set to start kindergarten next week. 

Scriven suggested another five minutes might’ve killed Charlie and says that people should get rid of metal straws or keep them from use by children. Many parts of New York have a single-use plastic straw ban.

Director of pediatric neurosurgery Dr. David Chesler said that’s unclear the permanent effect the injury will have on Charlie’s brain.

But Chesler added: ‘Kids his age just have the most unbelievable ability to recover from this damage that (adults) just can’t. It’s unreal what they can sustain and recover from.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk