Boris Johnson blames bureaucracy for Northern Ireland food shortages


Boris Johnson was warned today that Brexit trade rules that have left supermarket shelves in Northern Ireland empty of fresh food risk undermining the Good Friday Agreement. 

DUP MP Sir Jeffrey Donaldson urged the Government to intervene to resolve the issues that have hindered the flow of food products from Great Britain to Northern Ireland since the end of the transition period.

Sainsbury’s, Marks & Spencer and Tesco have all faced supply issues after the new customs paperwork came in following the transition period ending on January 1.

Fresh fruit, vegetables and chilled meat are among the products most affected as many food suppliers face delays on getting goods into the country.

The Prime Minister said ‘teething problems’ were to blame for a lack of fresh fruit and vegetables in Ulster in the past weeks – branding the situation as ‘absurd’.

But Unionist Sir Jeffrey today warned that the 1998 Anglo-Irish deal which ended three decades of bitter violence risks being breached as a result of disruption to post-Brexit Irish Sea trade.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘The protocol (which governs the new arrangements) is damaging the Northern Ireland economy and if it damages the Northern Ireland economy it actually undermines the Good Friday agreement.

‘And furthermore, that agreement makes clear that Northern Ireland will remain an integral part of the United Kingdom unless the people of Northern Ireland vote otherwise.

‘Therefore this breaches a fundamental element of the Good Friday agreement by increasingly separating Northern Ireland from Great Britain in trading terms – our biggest trading partner, our biggest trading market, and that simply doesn’t help anyone in Northern Ireland.’ 

Unionist Sir Jeffrey Donaldson (right) today warned that the 1998 Anglo-Irish deal which ended three decades of bitter violence risks being breached as a result of disruption to post-Brexit Irish Sea trade.

The Prime Minister said 'teething problems' were to blame for a lack of fresh fruit and vegetables in Ulster in the past weeks - branding the situation as 'absurd'.

The Prime Minister said ‘teething problems’ were to blame for a lack of fresh fruit and vegetables in Ulster in the past weeks – branding the situation as ‘absurd’.

Sainsbury's (Bangor, Co Down branch pictured), Marks & Spencer and Tesco have all faced supply issues after the new customs paperwork came in following the transition period ending on January 1.

Sainsbury’s (Bangor, Co Down branch pictured), Marks & Spencer and Tesco have all faced supply issues after the new customs paperwork came in following the transition period ending on January 1.

Facing the Commons Liaison Committee Mr Johnson said the Government would invoke Article 16 of the Northern Ireland Protocol - which allows it to unilaterally impose safeguards - if serious issues arise

Facing the Commons Liaison Committee Mr Johnson said the Government would invoke Article 16 of the Northern Ireland Protocol – which allows it to unilaterally impose safeguards – if serious issues arise

Retailers have warned that shops in Northern Ireland could face further problems unless the EU is prepared to extend the 'grace period' in the Brexit agreement

Retailers have warned that shops in Northern Ireland could face further problems unless the EU is prepared to extend the ‘grace period’ in the Brexit agreement

UK fish ‘happier’ after Brexit, says Rees-Mogg 

Fish in British waters are ‘better and happier’ after Brexit, according to Jacob Rees-Mogg.

The Commons Leader, responding to concerns from the SNP in Parliament today about the effect on fishing fleets, told MPs: ‘What is happening is that the Government is tackling this issue, dealing with it as quickly as possible, and the key thing is we’ve got our fish back.

‘They’re now British fish and they’re better and happier fish for it.’

Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle intervened and noted: ‘Obviously there’s no overwhelming evidence for that.’

SNP Commons leader Tommy Sheppard earlier labelled it the ‘Brexit fishing disaster’ and asked for a debate on compensation for the Scottish fishing industry.

He said: ‘Boats confined to harbour, lorry loads of seafood destroyed, the industry losing £1 million a day as firms go bust – all as a result of Brexit red tape imposed by this Government.

‘Yet when asked about this yesterday, the Prime Minister refused to answer.’ 

Mr Johnson last night sent a clear warning to the EU that he would bypass Brexit trade rules between Britain and Northern Ireland as he blamed ‘bureaucracy’ for empty supermarket shelves.

Facing the Commons Liaison Committee Mr Johnson said the Government would invoke Article 16 of the Northern Ireland Protocol – which allows it to unilaterally impose safeguards – if serious issues arise.

‘What I can certainly guarantee is that if there are serious problems in… supplying supermarkets in Northern Ireland because of some piece of bureaucracy that’s misapplied, then we will simply exercise Article 16 of the protocol,’ he said.

‘It is absurd that there should be such difficulties.’

Retailers have warned that shops in Northern Ireland could face further problems unless the EU is prepared to extend the ‘grace period’ in the Brexit agreement.

British Retail Consortium director Andrew Opie said problems which had resulted in a shortage of some food products following the end of the Brexit transition period on December 31 had ‘just about’ been overcome.

But he told MPs there could be fresh difficulties in April when a series of exemptions on goods being moved to Northern Ireland from Great Britain comes to an end.

Mr Johnson told MPs on the Commons Liaison Committee: ‘The situation in Northern Ireland is that trade is flowing smoothly, as I understand it.

‘And exporters are benefiting from the unfettered access between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

‘Yes, I am not going to deny down that there are teething problems, and there are issues that we need to sort out… but the deal has been of great, great assistance to our businesses in smoothing this.’

Earlier Mr Opie warned MPs that ‘if we do not find a workable solution for retailers in the next couple of months we do face significant disruption in Northern Ireland’.

He told the Commons Brexit Committee that supermarkets which exported to the Republic of Ireland had found the system was ‘unworkable’ as far as their supply chains were concerned.

‘That is why we need to think about Northern Ireland. We should not just be trying to apply the same processes that apply to the EU into Great Britain-Northern Ireland,’ he said.

‘Sending a lasagne from Great Britain to the Republic of Ireland is so complicated. You have to have authorisation going up through the chain, the vet at the end has to sign it off and he has to see all the authorisations.’

Controls on goods moving to Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK are required under the terms of the Brexit settlement agreed by Mr Johnson, to ensure there is no return to a hard border with the Republic.

Food and Drink Federation chief executive Ian Wright warned that without changes to the deals, the industry would have to rethink all its supply routes, leading to increased costs and delays.

British Retail Consortium director Andrew Opie said problems which had resulted in a shortage of some food products following the end of the Brexit transition period on December 31 had 'just about' been overcome. But he told MPs there could be fresh difficulties in April.

British Retail Consortium director Andrew Opie said problems which had resulted in a shortage of some food products following the end of the Brexit transition period on December 31 had ‘just about’ been overcome. But he told MPs there could be fresh difficulties in April.

‘Unless the deal changes in some material way we are going to see the re-engineering of almost all the EU-UK and GB-NI supply chains over the next six months,’ he said.

He said that one international supplier had found that the paperwork for a consignment moving from the UK to the EU which would normally have taken three hours to complete had so far taken five days – and they were still working on it.

Mr Wright also expressed concern about the potential for delays at the Channel ports as the numbers of lorries making the crossing picked up over the coming months.

‘It will get worse. Currently volumes across the short straits are at about 2,000 lorries. They should be around 10,000. So the opportunity for the scale of concerns to rise is huge,’ he said.

Mr Opie also issued a warning over disruption to goods crossing the Channel, saying ‘it will get worse before it gets better’.

He said he is on watch for any impact this week and onwards, with British businesses ‘still not 100% prepared’ for the changes as the French step up customs checks.

‘So we are anticipating problems. We’re hoping that they will be relatively minor and consumers don’t notice a difference,’ Mr Opie told the MPs.

‘This is our peak import season and I couldn’t stress this is probably the worst time of the year to try and manage disruption on the short straits.’

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